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Information for offer holders

We offer flexible degree programmes which enable you to study a range of topics or specialise in particular areas. Jump to a summary of each course structure by clicking the links below:

English Literature (Q300)

Year one

Module Description
The Epic Tradition Includes study of Homer and Virgil in translation, Milton and Walcott.
Modes of Reading Introduction to the practices of criticism including form, genre and literary inheritance.
Medieval to Renaissance English Literature Middle English and 16th-century literature focusing on Chaucer's contemporaries and Elizabethan poetry.
Modern World Literatures An introduction to anglophone and non-anglophone literatures from the French Revolution (1789) to the present, with a primary focus on the question of literary and cultural modernity. (There is an option to study a modern language instead of Modern World Literatures.)


Years two and three

You'll choose one of the following four pathways, each with a wide variety of modules to choose from:



English Literature and Creative Writing (QP36)

Year one

Module Description
Modes of Reading Introduction to the practices of criticism including form, genre and literary inheritance.
Modes of Writing An introduction complementing Modes of Reading that prepares you more the more specialist writing options in years two and three.
Medieval to Renaissance English Literature Middle English and 16th-century literature focusing on Chaucer's contemporaries and Elizabethan poetry.
Modern World Literatures An introduction to anglophone and non-anglophone literatures from the French Revolution (1789) to the present, with a primary focus on the question of literary and cultural modernity. (There is an option to study a modern language instead of Modern World Literatures.)


Year two

Composition and Creative Writing
The Practice of Poetry or another approved module which must be at least 50% examined
Shakespeare and Selected Dramatists of His Time or a module in English with a pre-1900 element that must be at least 50% examined
Any module from the English department or another University department that is at least 50% examined


Year three

Two of the following three optional core modules: The Practice of Fiction, The Practice of Poetry or Personal Writing Project
Shakespeare and Selected Dramatists of His Time or a module in English with a pre-1900 element that must be at least 50% examined
Any module from the English department or another University department that is at least 50% examined



English and Theatre Studies (QW34)

Year one

British Theatre since 1939
Medieval to Renaissance English Literature
Choose one of: The Epic Tradition, Modern World Literatures or a language module
Introduction to Theatre and Performance Studies


Year two

Drama and Democracy
Aspects of Theatre and Performance
Seventeenth-Century Literature and Culture or Romantic and Victorian Poetry
Choose from a range of approved modules in English, Theatre Studies or any other University department


Year three

Shakespeare and Selected Dramatists of His Time
Choose one of the approved modules in Theatre Studies
Choose two modules from the approved modules in the English department


Can I study modules from other departments?

Yes, you'll be able to take modules from departments other than English. In the first year, for example, you may choose to drop one of the core English modules and study a foreign language instead.

In years two and three, you may take modules from other departments with the guidance and support of your Personal Tutor and within the limits set by the University's regulations. Popular options outside English are from the Film & TV Studies, Classics and Philosophy departments. However, provided your Personal Tutor and the outside department agrees, you may choose from any of the undergraduate modules offered across the University.

Student societies form the backbone of the social community on campus. With over 250 opportunities, the University of Warwick has more societies than any other university in the UK (and this is independent of our 73 sports clubs!).

Here are three of the societies popular with students in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies:

Warwick Literature Society

'Lit.Soc' is open to any Warwick student from any degree programme and exists to organise events and opportunities for people to make friends and have fun. The focus is on relaxed socials, theatre trips, cinema trips and other gatherings where students meet like-minded literature enthusiasts.

On the academic side, the society runs discussion groups, drop-in sessions and more with student mentors to help first-year students settle in. The society is run by a student committee elected by its members and is always open to suggestions for events and activities.

Writing Society

The Writing Society provides a forum for writers of all genres – poetry, prose, screenwriting, scriptwriting, improvisational stand-up and more – and is focused on helping students put ideas on paper.

Informal meetings enable members to talk about books, authors and ideas with anyone able to bring in their writing and talk about their work.

Shakespeare Society

Given our close proximity to Shakepeare's birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon, there are frequent trips for Shakespeare enthusiasts to see Royal Shakespeare Company productions. This society provides students with an opportunity to discuss, learn, perform and enthuse about the works of the Bard.

With a range of societies dedicated to theatre, performance, media and more, there is something for everyone here at Warwick. Take a look at the full list of societies on the Students' Union website.

 

“I find my course incredibly fulfilling and spend every day doing what I enjoy most. English Literature at Warwick is a multi-faceted and interdisciplinary course and one of the greatest things about it is the lack of limitations: I spend time reading up on history, politics, philosophy, archaeology, psychology, theology and so many other subjects.

I'm only a first year but I'm constantly trying out new things: learning French, getting an enjoyable part-time job as a Student Caller, being involved with student politics, staging a zombie apocalypse with Warwick TV, struggling to use kitchen appliances and shocking all my friends by committing myself to a sport! I've found campus to be a bit like a student utopia and I'll always remember my third and second year friends for the way that they have helped me through the first few disorientating weeks.”

— Maahwish Mirza


“What I love about my course is that it is very flexible. I am doing Renaissance modules in the Italian part of my degree, as well as a North American Women Writers module in English. I also just got back from my year abroad in Italy, which really helped me improve my Italian and gave me the opportunity to work on a research project with two other students. I also got my first real job as a research assistant over the summer thanks to the project. I think Warwick is great because, besides doing an amazing degree, I also have the time to pursue many other interests, as the campus offers so many possibilities. In addition to my course, I'm studying Mandarin Chinese at the Language Centre. I also decided to pick up the clarinet again this year and I signed up for lessons at the Music Centre.”

— Marta Segit