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Ecopoetics

Warwick Writing Programme is home to Ecopoetics@Warwick. Beyond nature writing, ecopoetics ranges from the making and study of pastoral and wilderness poetry to the intersection of poetry and animal studies, or from the poetics of urban environments to poets' responses to disasters and matters of environmental justice. It might mean the study and deployment of formal strategies modeling ecological processes like complexity, nonlinearity, feedback loops, and recycling, or even a “slow poetry” that joins in a push for sustainable, regional economies. It might explore how the body, differently abled, becomes a site for creatively engaging the ecopolitical as personal, or entail situationist interventions in physical and social environments. Diversifying the “monocrop” of a dominant language like English through translation practices also contributes to ecopoetics.

It may be that ecopoetics locates “sites” rather than “kinds” of writing. We might compare ecopoetics with the site-specificity that has evolved in art criticism, to address practices that take the work of art beyond the gallery. Ecopoetics takes the writing out of the classroom, the bookstore and library, even out of the book itself, shifting the focus from themes and styles to institutional critique of green discourse itself and to an array of practices converging on the oikos, the planet earth that is the only home our species currently knows.

The core of ecopoetics@Warwick includes the ecopoetics workshops, EN355 and EN991 (undergraduate and MA) taught by Jonathan Skinner, founder and editor of the journal ecopoetics. David Morley includes a "slow poetry" component, and many field-based writing exercises, in his Practice of Poetry workshop. George Ttoouli, PhD candidate actively researching ecopoetics, also teaches in this area. Sarah Moss teaches field-based, site-specific units in her workshops.

Ecopoetics@Warwick also overlaps with seminars and events sponsored by Critical Environments, a research collective in the Warwick Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies.

Events (2014)

LUNCH POETRY

All events held 1-2 pm in H545 (Fifth floor Humanities Building, University of Warwick) and are free and open to the public.

January 14th COLE SWENSEN / PETER LARKIN

Cole Swensen has published more than ten poetry collections and as many translations of works from the French. Swensen’s books include Ours: poems on the gardens of Andre Le Notre (2008) and Gravesend (2012). With David St. John, she edited American Hybrid: A Norton Anthology of New Poetry (2009).

Peter Larkin’s three collections of poetry are Terrain Seed Scarcity, (2001), Leaves of Field (2006) and Lessways Least Scarce Among (2012). Give Forest its Next Portent is due in 2014. Larkin’s essay collection, Wordsworth and Coleridge: Promising Losses, appeared with Palgrave MacMillan in 2012.

February 18th MAGGIE O’SULLIVAN / DAVID DUNN

Maggie O' Sullivan is an internationally renowned poet, performer and visual artist, whose books include In the House of the Shaman (1996), red shifts (2001), Palace of Reptiles (2003), all origins are lonely (2003) and Body of Work (2006). The Salt Companion to Maggie O’Sullivan (2011) collects essays by contemporaries on her work.

David Dunn, a pioneer in the fields of acoustic ecology, bioacoustics, interspecies communication, and scientific sonification, has composed a body of experimental musical work that investigates the ultrasonic world beyond human hearing: The Sound of Light in Trees (2006), The Lion in Which the Spirits of the Royal Ancestors Make Their Home (1995), Angels and Insects (1992).

March 11th TOM PICKARD

Tom Pickard’s first book of poems, High on The Walls, appeared in 1968. Hoyoot: Collected Poems and Songs is due out in June of 2014 from Carcanet. He is currently collaborating with the singer-songwriter Ben Murray on his interpretation of Ballad of Jamie Allan (Flood, 2008) with song, field recordings, and poems.

INTERMITTENT LISTENING

All events begin at 8 pm at LAMP (Leamington Live Art & Music Project), in Leamington Spa Riverside, Adelaide Road, Leamington Spa CV32 5AH / tel. 01926 886699 http://leamingtonlamp.co.uk/ Admission £4 [£3 NUS]

January 14th COLE SWENSEN / JONATHAN SKINNER

Cole Swensen has published more than ten poetry collections and as many translations of works from the French. Swensen’s books include Ours: poems on the gardens of Andre Le Notre (2008) and Gravesend (2012). With David St. John, she edited American Hybrid: A Norton Anthology of New Poetry (2009).

Jonathan Skinner founded and edits the journal ecopoetics, which features creative-critical intersections between writing and ecology. His poetry collections include Birds of Tifft (BlazeVOX, 2011) and Political Cactus Poems (Palm Press, 2005). A former Professor of Environmental Studies at Bates College, Skinner teaches in the Writing Program at the University of Warwick.

February 18th MAGGIE O’SULLIVAN / DAVID DUNN

Maggie O' Sullivan is an internationally renowned poet, performer and visual artist, whose books include In the House of the Shaman (1996), red shifts (2001), Palace of Reptiles (2003), all origins are lonely (2003) and Body of Work (2006). The Salt Companion to Maggie O’Sullivan (2011) collects essays by contemporaries on her work.

David Dunn, a pioneer in the fields of acoustic ecology, bioacoustics, interspecies communication, and scientific sonification, has composed a body of experimental musical work that investigates the ultrasonic world beyond human hearing: The Sound of Light in Trees (2006), The Lion in Which the Spirits of the Royal Ancestors Make Their Home (1995), Angels and Insects (1992).

March 11th

TOM PICKARD / TREVOR JOYCE
plus special screening of Birmingham's What I Think With (feat. ROY FISHER)

Tom Pickard’s first book of poems, High on The Walls, appeared in 1968. Hoyoot: Collected Poems and Songs is due out in June of 2014 from Carcanet. He is currently collaborating with the singer-songwriter Ben Murray on his interpretation of Ballad of Jamie Allan (Flood, 2008) with song, field recordings, and poems.

Trevor Joyce co-founded New Writers’ Press in Dublin in 1967, and the SoundEye Festival in Cork, Ireland, in 1997. A collected poems appeared in 2001 as with the first dream of fire they hunt the cold (Shearsman/NWP), and more recent work was collected in What’s in Store (The Gig/NWP) in 2007.

(at 9 pm) Birmingham's What I Think With (1991, directed Tom Pickard). Roy Fisher, poet and jazz pianist, finds his language in the foundries, industrial canals and back streets of Birmingham. The film is a personal account, with specially commissioned new poems and music. Featured jazz musicians include Roy Williams, John Barnes, Len Skeat and Peter Cotterill.

Events sponsored by the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies and the Warwick Writing Program at the University of Warwick, through a Warwick Impact grant from the HRC, and in partnership with LAMP. For further information, contact Jonathan Skinner: J.E.Skinner@warwick.ac.uk

Resources

Ecopoetics@Warwick

ecopoetics

Conference on Ecopoetics 

Field Notes from the 2013 Conference on Ecopoetics

Women and Ecopoetics

Skinner: Ecopoetics