Skip to main content

Emeritus Professor Carolyn Steedman FBA

 

History Department
University of Warwick
Coventry CV4 7AL
Email: c.k.steedman@warwick.ac.uk 

I am now Emeritus Professor in the University of Warwick History Department. My most recent book, An Everyday Life of the English Working Class was published in December 2013 (www.cambridge.org/9781107670297 ). Having spent two years doggedly pursuing things left over from An Everyday Life (lawyers letters, threatening letters, everyday uses of the law) I have finally finished the book Poetry for Historians. It is about the practice, writing and meaning of history in the modern world, and has a lot to do with the history-poetry of W. H. Auden. It will be published by Manchester University Press in the autumn of 2017.

Academic Profile
  • BA Sussex
  • PhD Cambridge
Publications: Books
  • The Tidy House (1982)
  • Policing the Victorian Community (1984)
  • Language, Gender and Childhood (edited with Cathy Urwin and Valerie Walkerdine, 1985)
  • Landscape for a Good Woman (1986)
  • The Radical Soldier's Tale: John Pearman, 1819-1908 (1988)
  • Margaret McMillan. Childhood, Culture and Class in Britain (1990)
  • Past Tenses. Essays on Writing, Autobiography and History (1992)
  • Strange Dislocations. Childhood and the Idea of Human Interiority, 1780-1930 (1995)
  • Dust (2001)
  • Master and Servant. Love and Labour in the English Industrial Age (2007)
  • Labours Lost. Domestic Service and the Making of Modern England (2009)
  • An Everyday Life of the English Working Class. Work, Self, and Sociability in the Early Ninteenth Century (2013)
  • The Radical Soldier's Tale. John Pearman, 1819-1908 (2016). This has been reissued as a Routledge Library Edition in the The Victorian World series.
  • Language, Gender and Childhood (1985) has been resissued apart of Routledge Revivals:History Workshop Series (2016)
Publications: Some Recent Articles, Chapters and Reviews
  • 'Living with the Dead’, The Craft of Knowledge. Experiences of Living with Data, Carol Smart and Jennifer Hockley (eds), Palgrave, 2014, pp.162-175.
  • `Mayhew: On Reading, About Writing', Journal of Victorian Culture, 19:4 (2014), pp. 550-561. http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/TEY4aEsU62usRPqU4g2i/full
  • `Review of Hanne Østhus, Contested Authority. Master and Servant in Copenhagen and Christian, 1750-1850', Sjuttonhundratal. Nordic Yearbook for Eighteenth-Century Studies, 2014, pp.132-4.
  • `On a Bridge', Changing English. Studies in Culture and Education, 22:3 (2015), pp. 245-259.
  • `The Poetry of It (Writing History)', Angelika Bammer and Ruth-Ellen Joeres (eds), The Future of Scholarly Writing: Critical Interventions, Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2015, pp. 215-226.
  • `A Lawyer's Letter. Everyday Uses of the Law in Early Nineteenth-Century England', History Workshop Journal, 80:1 (2016), pp. 62-83.
  • Review of Fatherhood and the British Working Class, 1865-1914, by Julie-Marie Strange, The English Historical Review, 131 (2016), pp. 693-695

  • 'Wall in the Head’, Review of Respectable: The Experience of Class by Lynsey Hanley, London Review of Books, 38:15 (28 July 2016), pp. 29-30

  • 'Being There: Living the Industrial Revolution’, Industrialisation and Society in Britain. Cromford and Beyond in the Era of the Industrial Revolution, Chris Wrigley (ed.), The Arkwright Society, Cromford, 2016, pp.39-55

  • `Threatening Letters. E. E. Dodd, E. P. Thompson and the Making of "The Crime of Anonymity", History Workshop Journal, 80:2 (2016), pp. 50-82.
  • `Sluzba I Milczenie', Praktyka Teoretyczna, 1:23 (2017), pp. 64-83.
Recent Talks, Papers, Conference Presentations and Broadcasts
  • `Beginning Archive Fever', 20 Years of Archive Fever, The Freud Museum, London (held at the Anna Freud Centre), July 2014.
  • `"Nothing to Say But Itself". Writing at the End of the Early Modern Era in England', Newberry Library, Chicago, October 2014
  • `A Lawyer's Letter. Everyday Uses of the Law at the Beginning of the Nineteenth Century in England', Nicholson Center for British Studies, University of Chicago, October 2014.
  • `Writing Everyday. A Framework Knitter's Diaries c.1800-1815', Diaries Symposium, Manchester Centre for Regional History at Manchester Metropolitan University, November 2014.
  • `Writing Up the Writer. Joseph Woolley, Sir Gervase Clifton, and the Law', The Local History Seminar, University of Nottingham, November 2014.
  • `Gendered Subjectivity, A Conversation with Catherine Hall', Gender Institute, London School of Economics, November 2014.
  • Roundtable Discussion (with Ruth Percy) of Selina Todd's The People, Institute of Historical Research, November 2014.
  • `Writing a Writer (Autour d'un écrivain): Joseph Woolley, Sir Gervase Clifton and the Law', Séminaire franco-brittannique d'histoire, Université Paris IV-Sorbonne, February 2015.
  • `A Lawyer's Letter. Everyday Uses of the Law at the Turn of the English Nineteenth Century', Contemporary British History Seminar, History Department, University of Birmingham, February 2015
  • `A Lawyer's Letter. Everyday Uses of the Law at the Turn of the English Nineteenth Century', Modern British History Seminar, University of Cambridge, March 2015.
  • `Text or Document? The Diaries (1800-1815) of Joseph Woolley', Archives and Texts Seminar, University of Reading, April 2015.
  • `Law in the Archive', Archives and Forms of Knowledge Seminar, University of Oxford, May 2015.
  • `What Remains', Plenary Lecture, Performance and Politics in the 1970s Conference (QML & Live Art Development Agency), Whitechapel Gallery, London, May 2015.
  • `Being There. Living the Industrial Revolution', Industrialisation and Society in Britain Conference, Arkwright Society, Cromford Mill, Cromford, September 2015.
  • `Law and the Making of Community in early Nineteenth-century England', The Long Ninteenth-century Graduate Seminar: Reshaping Communities in the Long Nineteenth Century, University of Oxford, October 2015.
  • `Young Women at University in the 1960s and 1970s: A Conversation with Margaret Drabble', Warwick History's Anniversary Event, University of Warwick, October 2015.
  • `Threatening Letters. E. P. Thompson, E. E. Dodd, and the Service Relationship in Historical Research', Reconfiguring Britain Seminar, Institute of Historical Research, University of London, November 2015
  • `Poetry for Historians', School of History Seminar, University of Bristol, November 2015.
  • `Lord Mansfield's Voices. In the Archive, Hearing Things', Plenary Lecture, Gerald Aylmer Seminar on `The Experience of the Archive', Institute of Historical Research, London, April 2016.
  • `Fleeting and Fragmentary. Things Fall Apart', Im/material: Encounters within the Creative Arts Archive Conference, Chelsea College of Art, University of the Arts, London, May 2016.
  • `Poetry for Historians', History Seminar, Manchester University, October 2016.
  • `Where Have You Been?', Keynote Lecture, Creating the City Conference, University of Malmo, February 2017.
  • `Restoring Lost Voices of History', Medea Vox #15, Malmo University, Sweden, March 2017, media.mah.se/2017/02/vox-lost-voices-of-history/
  • `Poetry for Historians', Philosophy of History Seminar, Institute of Historical Research, London, March 2017.
  • Interviewed for `Archive Fever', BBC Radio 4, Archive on 4, Saturday 15th April 2017–but you can't Listen Again: `Matthew Sweet attempts to live in the moment and evade posterity as he pieces together an edition of Archive on 4 without the use of any archive whatsoever–and in a valiant attempt at autodestructive radio, ties to remove all trace of this very programme from the world ...'.
  • `Never Married', Keynote Lecture, Women's History Association of Ireland Annual Conference, University of Galway, April 2017.
  • `Remembering: Jeremiah Brandreth, E. P. Thompson, Arnold Wesker', Plenary Lecture, Radicalism and Popular Protest in Britain 1790-1820, Derby University and Derby City Museum, June 2017.