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The Criminal Justice Centre, located within the School of Law at Warwick, is devoted to the development of research scholarship, training and wider public engagement in criminal justice.

The Criminal Justice Centre

in the School of Law at Warwick is a research centre, comprising one of the strongest groups of criminal justice scholars in the UK, devoted to the development of research scholarship, training and wider public engagement in criminal justice.

It provides the focus for a range of research activities including conferences, collaborative and interdisciplinary projects, workshops and other events, as well as hosting leading scholars and young researchers through its visitors programme.

We have particular research strength in:
  • Comparative criminal justice
  • Criminal offences and criminalization
  • Human rights & criminal justice
  • Ethnographic research
  • Criminal trials
  • The philosophy of punishment
  • International criminal law
We are currently engaged in large-scale European funded projects, a range of collaborative projects with scholars across the globe and research funded through major prestigious fellowships.

The criminal justice system in comparative and EU context

Comparative research is one of the hallmarks of research at Warwick Law School. It is conducted in a variety of ways, including large scale empirical projects and European collaborations, all adopting a contextual socio-legal approach. At the heart of this research is an interrogation of the effectiveness of procedural safeguards of accused persons across a range of criminal procedural traditions. There are many instances of Warwick's comparative research informing policy and the expertise of Hodgson in particular has been relied on directly by the courts. The Criminal Justice Centre has a growing cohort of doctoral students undertaking empirical and comparative criminal justice research.

From legal rules to legal practices

Criminal Justice at Warwick has a strong tradition of empirical research. Using qualitative methodologies, research has examined not just how law operates in practice, but why it operates as it does. How do legal and occupational cultures affect the daily practices of law? How do resources, or the value systems of legal actors influence the effectiveness of legal rules? Empirical legal research helps us understand how the law works – the impact that law, legal institutions, legal personnel and associated phenomena have on people, communities and societies, as well as the influence that various social, economic and political factors have on law, legal phenomena and institutions.

International Criminal Law

The exploration by Warwick Law School of international criminal law, albeit a fairly fledgling field is rapidly establishing itself as a strong area of research. Warwick staff takes a critical approach to a variety of theoretical, legal and practical issues, including the responsibility for war crimes, the philosophical underpinnings of international criminal law, justice and international crimes and the understanding of the concept of gender within international criminal law.

A Long Tradition of Theoretical and Philosophical Scholarship

Staff at Warwick have engaged in philosophical reflection on a broad range of issues in criminal justice, including criminal responsibility, the justification of punishment, the proper scope and content of the criminal law, as well as philosophical issues concerning criminal trials, evidence and procedure. Scholarship on the philosophical foundations of the criminal law at Warwick is also notable for its engagement with a broader range of questions in moral, social, legal and political theory. In keeping with the interdisciplinary approach to law that has been fostered at Warwick, several members of the Criminal Justice Centre are also closely engaged with the Centre for Ethics, Law and Public Affairs, which discuss a broader range of questions of moral and legal philosophy and the role of central social institutions.

The Criminal Justice Centre

in the School of Law at Warwick is a research centre, comprising one of the strongest groups of criminal justice scholars in the UK, devoted to the development of research scholarship, training and wider public engagement in criminal justice.

It provides the focus for a range of research activities including conferences, collaborative and interdisciplinary projects, workshops and other events, as well as hosting leading scholars and young researchers through its visitors programme.

We have particular research strength in:
  • Comparative criminal justice
  • Criminal offences and criminalization
  • Human rights & criminal justice
  • Ethnographic research
  • Criminal trials
  • The philosophy of punishment
  • International criminal law
We are currently engaged in large-scale European funded projects, a range of collaborative projects with scholars across the globe and research funded through major prestigious fellowships.

Events

This calendar's schedule is empty.
  • Comparative Research
  • Empirical Research
  • International Criminal Law
  • Theoretical Research
The criminal justice system in comparative and EU context


Comparative research is one of the hallmarks of research at Warwick Law School. It is conducted in a variety of ways, including large scale empirical projects and European collaborations, all adopting a contextual socio-legal approach. At the heart of this research is an interrogation of the effectiveness of procedural safeguards of accused persons across a range of criminal procedural traditions. There are many instances of Warwick's comparative research informing policy and the expertise of Hodgson in particular has been relied on directly by the courts. The Criminal Justice Centre has a growing cohort of doctoral students undertaking empirical and comparative criminal justice research.

From legal rules to legal practices


Criminal Justice at Warwick has a strong tradition of empirical research. Using qualitative methodologies, research has examined not just how law operates in practice, but why it operates as it does. How do legal and occupational cultures affect the daily practices of law? How do resources, or the value systems of legal actors influence the effectiveness of legal rules? Empirical legal research helps us understand how the law works – the impact that law, legal institutions, legal personnel and associated phenomena have on people, communities and societies, as well as the influence that various social, economic and political factors have on law, legal phenomena and institutions.

International Criminal Law


The exploration by Warwick Law School of international criminal law, albeit a fairly fledgling field is rapidly establishing itself as a strong area of research. Warwick staff takes a critical approach to a variety of theoretical, legal and practical issues, including the responsibility for war crimes, the philosophical underpinnings of international criminal law, justice and international crimes and the understanding of the concept of gender within international criminal law.

A Long Tradition of Theoretical and Philosophical Scholarship


Staff at Warwick have engaged in philosophical reflection on a broad range of issues in criminal justice, including criminal responsibility, the justification of punishment, the proper scope and content of the criminal law, as well as philosophical issues concerning criminal trials, evidence and procedure. Scholarship on the philosophical foundations of the criminal law at Warwick is also notable for its engagement with a broader range of questions in moral, social, legal and political theory. In keeping with the interdisciplinary approach to law that has been fostered at Warwick, several members of the Criminal Justice Centre are also closely engaged with the Centre for Ethics, Law and Public Affairs, which discuss a broader range of questions of moral and legal philosophy and the role of central social institutions.