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Ash dieback: Insect threat to fungus-resistant trees

Ash trees which can resist the killer dieback fungus may be more vulnerable to attacks by insects, says University of Warwick researcher.


‘Glue’ that makes plant cell walls strong could hold the key to wooden skyscrapers

Molecules 10,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair could hold the key to making possible wooden skyscrapers and more energy-efficient paper production, according to research led by a father and son team at the Universities of Warwick and Cambridge.


Christmas dinner saved! Sprouts gain natural disease defence

Brussels sprouts will remain safely in our Christmas dinners, thanks to University of Warwick research giving them natural defences against devastating crop diseases.


UK steel production to benefit from efficiency innovation

Steel production in the UK could be cheaper and more energy-efficient in the future, thanks to research at WMG, University of Warwick.


Warwick and Waitrose tackle global food security together

Food security is at the heart of a new doctoral training collaboration between the University of Warwick and Waitrose, thanks to an award from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).


Construction greener and more efficient with intelligent software

Construction vehicles could become more efficient and environmentally-friendly, thanks to new technology developed by WMG at the University of Warwick.


Solar power could become cheaper and more widespread

A breakthrough in solar power could make it cheaper and more commercially viable, thanks to research at the University of Warwick.


Student satellite set for space to help global conservation

A fully-orbiting satellite, set to be launched to the International Space Station to help global conservation projects, is being designed and built by engineering students at the University of Warwick.


Green monkeys acquired Staphylococcus aureus from humans

Already it’s known that many deadly diseases that afflict humans were originally acquired through contact with animals. However new research from the University of Warwick shows that pathogens can also jump the species barrier to move from humans to animals.


Plants remember stress to help protect themselves

A new generation of plants better adapted to mitigate the effects of environmental change could be created following a fundamental step towards understanding how plants are able to retain a memory of stress exposure.

Tue 31 May 2016, 16:10 | Tags: Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Science, Environment

New book by Friends of the Earth to spark debate and action on women's empowerment to protect our natural environment

‘Why women will save the planet’ released today features 25 articles and interviews from leading lights in the environmental and feminist movements including Dr Sarah Richardson of the University of Warwick’s History department.

Wed 25 November 2015, 15:20 | Tags: Book, Environment, History

University of Warwick introduces pioneering new campus cycle scheme UniCycles at Warwick

On Saturday 3 October the University of Warwick introduced a new cycle scheme on campus, UniCycles at Warwick, in partnership with German company nextbike. It is hoped that the UniCycles at Warwick will help to create an even greener more accessible campus at the University of Warwick.


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