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Ash dieback: Insect threat to fungus-resistant trees

Ash trees which can resist the killer dieback fungus may be more vulnerable to attacks by insects, says University of Warwick researcher.


Deadly sleeping sickness set to be eliminated in six years

Gambian sleeping sickness – a deadly parasitic disease spread by tsetse flies - could be eliminated in six years in key regions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), according to new research by the University of Warwick.


Christmas dinner saved! Sprouts gain natural disease defence

Brussels sprouts will remain safely in our Christmas dinners, thanks to University of Warwick research giving them natural defences against devastating crop diseases.


Warwick and Waitrose tackle global food security together

Food security is at the heart of a new doctoral training collaboration between the University of Warwick and Waitrose, thanks to an award from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).


Nobel Prize Winner opens Warwick Medical School building

Nobel Prize winner Dr Randy Schekman has given the keynote speech at the opening of the latest addition to Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick.


Next steps towards preventing cancer and Alzheimer’s

A new generation of drugs that prevent cancer and Alzheimer’s could be developed, thanks to research from the University of Warwick.


Plants remember stress to help protect themselves

A new generation of plants better adapted to mitigate the effects of environmental change could be created following a fundamental step towards understanding how plants are able to retain a memory of stress exposure.

Tue 31 May 2016, 16:10 | Tags: Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Science, Environment

Fruit discovery could provide new treatments for obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease

A combination of two compounds found in red grapes and oranges could be used to improve the health of people with diabetes, and reduce cases of obesity and heart disease.

The find has been made by University of Warwick researchers who now hope that their discovery will be developed to provide a treatment for patients.


Plants use a molecular clock to predict when they’ll be infected

Plants are able to predict when infections are more likely to occur and regulate their immune response accordingly, new research has found.

Led by the University of Warwick, the researchers discovered that a plants’ molecular clock is connected to their immune system to increase levels of resistance to infection at dawn – the time at which fungal infections appear most likely to occur, with plants unable to maintain the highest level of resistance at all times of day.

Wed 16 December 2015, 14:44 | Tags: Sciences, University of Warwick, School of Life Sciences

Bacteria cells group together in communities and use electrical signalling to survive

Groups of bacteria use electrical signalling to communicate, new research published in the journal Nature has found.

The electro-communication mechanism was found to be surprisingly similar to action potential mechanism in neurons found in animal brains and central nervous systems.

Tue 24 November 2015, 14:00 | Tags: Sciences, University of Warwick, School of Life Sciences, Research