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Books by University Authors

Emma Mason (ed.): 'The Collected Poems' by Elizabeth Jennings

Dr Emma Mason, Reader in English at the University of Warwick's Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies, presents a new and definitive edition of the poetry of one of the best-loved and most enduringly popular modern poets: Elizabeth Jennings.

Tue 10 April 2012, 13:35 | Tags: Arts

A Venetian Miscellany

A collection of essays which celebrate Warwick's long connection with the city of Venice - not least its occupation of the Palazzo Pesaro Papafava, which has become the University's permanent Italian base.

Mon 07 November 2011, 16:30 | Tags: Language Studies, Arts

Keith Grint's 'Leadership - A Very Short Introduction'.

The subject of leadership raises many questions: What is it? How does it differ from management and command? Are leaders born or bred? Who are the leaders? Do we actually need leaders? Professor Keith Grint, Director of the Institute of Governance and Public Management at Warwick Business School, prompts the reader to rethink their understanding of what leadership is. He examines the way leadership has evolved from its earliest manifestations in ancient societies, highlighting the beginnings of leadership writings through Plato, Sun Tzu, Machiavelli and others, to consider the role of the social, economic, and political context undermining particular modes of leadership. Prof Grint spent ten years in industry before switching to an academic career. He has previously taught at Brunel University and Oxford University and held Chairs at Lancaster, and Cranfield Universities. He is a member of the Sunningdale Institute, National School of Government.

Mon 22 August 2011, 15:50

Susan Beckerleg's 'Ethnic Identity and Development - Social Change and Khat in Africa'.

In 1980, the World Health Organisation identified khat as an abusive drug. However, khat could have been easily taken up by Europeans to be a globally popular beverage, as coffee is now. Both coffee and khat trees originate in the same place, and contain chemicals that have similar effects - however, khat cannot be successfully imported. By telling of the story of khat, Suan Beckerleg also explores social change, development priorities and shifting ethnic identities in Uganda over the last 80 years. Susan Beckerleg Senior Research Fellow at the University of Warwick's Institute of Health. She is a Social Anthropologist who has published widely on Africa and Arabia. For the past 25 years she has applied her training to health and development issues, both as an academic and as a freelance consultant in Africa and Asia. Her current interests include: psychotropic drugs in Africa; ethnicity and identity in East African and the Middle East.

Mon 22 August 2011, 15:49

Karen O'Brien's 'Women and the Enlightenment in the Eighteenth Century'.

This book is about the relationship between the Enlightenment and women in the eighteenth century. What did the Enlightenment do for women and how did they participate in the Enlightenment? This extract is from a chapter about the historian Catharine Macaulay. In her day she was an extraordinarily popular and successful historian, and one of the very few women to make a reputation in this kind of writing. Her eight volume History of England (1763-83) gave a scholarly but lively and radical assessment of seventeenth-century English history, including the Civil War and the Glorious Revolution. Notorious for defending the execution of Charles I, Macaulay's history later became more suspect and less popular, particularly after she publicly supported the American revolutionaries, and visited the newly independent America after the war was over.

Mon 22 August 2011, 15:48

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