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Panels and Abstracts

 

The ‘Usefulness’ of History for the Practice of Medicine, 1750-today

Panel organisers: Dr Rina Knoeff, University of Groningen, and Dr Claudia Stein, University of Warwick

Claudia Stein, University of Warwick: Exploring medical history’s ‘usefulness’ – Introductory Remarks

Thomas Broman, University of Wisconsin, Madison: 'What’s Pragmatic about a ‘pragmatische Geschichte’? Kurt Polykarp Sprengel’s Versuch einer pragmatischen Geschichte der Arzneykunde’

Professor Dr Volker Roelcke, University of Giessen: Why medical history? Reflections on the ‘usefulness’ of history for the medical profession (and beyond)

Professor Frank Huismann, University of Maastricht: Inconvenient Questions: Medical Humanities for Medical Students

Rina Knoeff, University of Groningen: final discussion

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Invisible Technicians, Medical Expertise and Practice

Dr Catherine Cox, School of History and Archives, University College Dublin: ‘J. Connolly, Taken from Nature’?: Patient Portraiture and the Pathological Society of Dublin, c.1830-1870

Tania Anne Woloshyn, Centre for the History of Medicine, University of Warwick: Women with ‘Flare’: Snapshots of Light Therapy’s Invisible Operators, c.1895-1945

Claire Jones, University of Leeds: Over the Counter and On the High Street: Commerce and Condoms in Britain, c. 1920-1960

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The Place of the Patient in Post-war Britain

Dr Alex Mold, the Centre for History in Public Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: 'The Place of the Patient in Post-war Britain'

Discussion with contributions from postgraduates at the Centre for the History of Medicine, University of Warwick

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Indigenous Knowledge, Power and the Everyday

Emeritus Professor David Hardiman, University of Warwick: Miracle Cures for a Suffering Nation: Sai Baba of Shirdi

Emeritus Professor David Arnold, University of Warwick: ‘How to Murder a Resident: Poison, Politics and India’s Toxic Transition, 1870-1914’

Professor Projit Bihari Mukharji, University of Pennsylvania: Whence Came the Devi? The Story of Mrs Duncan, the Bengali Goddess of Cholera

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History of Medicine in the Twentieth Century

Dr Vicky Long, Glasgow Caledonian University: Conceptualising Work-Related Mental Distress in the British Coalfields, c.1900-1950

Dr Roberta Bivins, University of Warwick: Assimilation, Integration, Exclusion: Interpreting Medical Responses to Migration in Post-War Britain

Dr Jonathan Toms, University of East Anglia: Self-Government and Mental Health: Re-Appraising Foucauldian Interpretations of the History of Psychiatry in the Twentieth Century