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Expert Panel


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There was an expert panel discussion after the Thursday evening performances in each venue, providing opportunities for audience members to discuss the making of the piece with researchers and the theatre company, and to engage in debate on issues raised by the performances.

The panel in Coventry was chaired by Professor Hilary Marland.

The panel in Dublin was chaired by Dr Laura Kelly, Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland, University College Dublin.

 

EXPERT PANEL MEMBERS

Peter Cann is a writer and director whose work ranges across performance forms from opera to small scale rural touring theatre. He has worked as a professional actor, director and playwright since 1980. He has written plays for small scale touring companies, plays for community tours to non theatre venues and large scale site specific events in Britain, Europe and Jamaica. He has written librettos for cantata and operas, and screenplays for television and video. His work as a director includes 3 years as artistic director of Pentabus Theatre. He leads workshops in all aspects of theatre and drama and lectures at FE and HE level.

Dr Catherine Cox is Director of the Centre for the History of Medicine at University College Dublin and co-convener of ‘A Malady of Migration’. She is author of Negotiating Insanity in the Southeast of Ireland, 1830-1900 (2012), co-editor with Hilary Marland of Migration, Health and Ethnicity in the Modern World (2013), and with Maria Luddy of Cultures of Care in Irish Medical History (2010). She is co-editor of the Journal of Irish Economic and Social History, and joint Principal Investigator on the Wellcome Trust-funded project, ‘Madness, Migration and the Irish in Lancashire, c.1850-1921’.

Dr Liz Hardwick is a Consultant Psychiatrist for the Avon and Wiltshire Partnership Trust, and previously worked in prison psychiatry. She is currently completing a Masters degree in the history of medicine at the University of Warwick and is writing a dissertation on bloodletting in nineteenth-century psychiatric practice.

Vivan Joseph is in the final year of a PhD in philosophy at the University of Warwick, researching the relationship between attention and awareness in visual experience. Before starting his PhD, he worked in a community setting for a local mental health charity for several years. Alongside his PhD, he manages an interdisciplinary undergraduate module on mental health, ‘Navigating Psychopathology’.

Professor Brendan Kelly is Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at University College Dublin, consultant psychiatrist at the Mater Misericordiae University Hospital and editor of the Irish Journal of Psychological Medicine. In addition to his medical degree, he holds doctorates in medicine (MD), history (PhD), governance (DGov) and law (PhD). He has researched and written on various aspects of psychiatric history, and is author of "Ada English: Patriot and Psychiatrist" (Irish Academic Press, September 2014).

Dr Laura Kelly is an Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland, University College Dublin. Her current research project focuses on the history of medical education and student culture, c.1830-1950 and she has published on the history of women in medicine in Ireland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and is author of Irish Women in Medicine, c1880-1920s. Origins, Education and Careers (Manchester University Press, 2012).

Maria Luddy is Professor of Modern Irish History at the University of Warwick and Head of Department. She has published extensively on the history of women in Ireland and on Irish social history of the 19th and 20th centuries. Recent publications include a short book on breach of promise to marry cases in county Limerick in the nineteenth century and an article on the abduction of women in early nineteenth-century Ireland. An edited collection on Children and Childhood in Ireland, 1700-2010, will be published later this year. A book on the history of marriage in Ireland, 1660-1925 (jointly written with Professor Mary O’Dowd, Queen’s University Belfast, will be published in 2015.

Professor Hilary Marland is Founding Director of the Centre for the History of Medicine at the University of Warwick and co-convener of ‘A Malady of Migration’. She is author of Dangerous Motherhood: Insanity and Childbirth in Victorian Britain (2004) and Health and Girlhood in Britain, 1874-1920 (2013), and co-editor with Catherine Cox of Migration, Health and Ethnicity in the Modern World (2013). She is joint Principal Investigator on the Wellcome Trust-funded project, ‘Madness, Migration and the Irish in Lancashire, c.1850-1921’.