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Cultural Connections, Digital Histories: Britain and the 19th-century Hispanic World

Module Code: HP313
Module Name: Cultural Connections, Digital Histories: Britain and the 19th-century Hispanic World
Module Credits: 15
What can a deeper understanding of cultural connections in the past tell us about the way we see other cultures today? How did people, objects and ideas travel between Britain and the Hispanic world during the nineteenth century, and what is the legacy of those connections? How can digital resources help us to communicate these connections and their legacy to a wider public?

This module will equip you to think critically about the dense web of cultural connections between Britain and the Hispanic world during the long nineteenth century (c. 1800-1914) and to communicate your learning to the public. You will gain experience in engaging in independent research with a range of primary sources; you will learn to critically evaluate existing digital resources, and you will gain experience in producing carefully-planned, open-access digital resources to communicate your research to the public through our own class Wiki.

The course is taught through two weekly hours: an hour of lecture and seminar discussion, and an hour of hands-on work in the computer lab. You will prepare for each session with guided research, reflection and close-reading of set texts or extracts, combined with guided exploration of digital examples. We will cover a range of topics, including the Peninsular Wars and their legacy; Orientalism and the Exotic; the Hispanic world in British museums and galleries; Spain as an early tourist destination, and the Hispanic world in the British streetscape. Lab sessions will explore topics such as forms of digital communication; digital biographies; using historic newspapers; and finding and using images within copyright. This is an exciting but demanding course with real public outcomes, and you will need to be prepared to read, think, experiment and try new things!


Assessment Method:

1000-1250-word commentary on an existing digital resource (20%)
2000-2500-word Wiki entry based on primary research into a person, artefact, event or concept (65%)
1000-1250-word reflection/commentary on Wiki process and outcome (15%)