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In Other Words: Translating Philosophy in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries

This conference (10-12 May 2017) relates specifically to the theory and practice of philosophical translation in the Renaissance. The first day will treat the broader issues and authors; the second and third will especially focus on Aristotle. The conference takes place at the University of Warwick, with participation of the ERC team in Venice as well as selected others.

Thu 16 February 2017, 08:31 | Tags: translation, Renaissance philosophy, Aristotelianism

New Publication: Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy

Fresh off the press is Vernacular Aristotelianism in Italy from the Fourteenth to the Seventeenth Century, ed. by Luca Bianchi, Simon Gilson and Jill Kraye (London: The Warburg Institute, 2016; Warburg Institute Colloquia 29), ISBN 978-1-908590-52-7. This publication is tied to a past AHRC research project shared between Warwick and the Warburg Institute.

 


Please click on the article heading above to see the table of contents.
Thu 02 February 2017, 15:28

Venice and Aristotle (c. 1450–c. 1600): From Greek and Latin to the Vernacular

Exhibition in the Sala Sansoviniana

Sale monumentali della Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana

Venice (21 April–19 May 2016)

This exhibition (along with its accompanying catalogue) aims to offer a broad representation of Renaissance Aristotelianism, paying particular attention to the role Venice played in the dissemination of this powerful current of thought. Chronologically it starts with the rich collection of manuscripts of the humanist and Greek émigré Basilios Bessarion (†1472), which formed the first nucleus of the Marciana Library in Venice. It then takes into consideration the diffusion of Aristotle’s works through the art of print until the end of the sixteenth century. As one of the great capitals of the European printing industry, Venice played a preeminent role in this phenomenon.

Wed 04 November 2015, 21:33


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