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Handbook

School of Theatre, Performance & Cultural Policy Studies

Undergraduate Handbook 2014-5


BA in Theatre and Performance Studies

BA in English and Theatre Studies

BA in French with Theatre Studies

BA in German with Theatre Studies

BA in Italian with Theatre Studies

Departmental information

Welcome

Hello to all incoming and returning students!

Introduction
This handbook contains key information that will assist you in completing your degree at the University of Warwick. It is intended for all undergraduates who take a single or joint honours degree in the department as well as containing much that will assist those wishing to study in the department from other disciplines. There is a separate Postgraduate handbook for those taking further degrees. During the year we will update this handbook to reflect any changes to department policy as necessary.

Departmental contact details

Name

RM

Tel (int)

email

Prof. Jim Davis

G27

74842

jim.davis@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Milija Gluhovic

F04a

74773

m.gluhovic@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Susan Haedecke

F05

50611

S.Haedicke@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Anna Harpin

F04b

tbc

tbc

Prof. Nadine Holdsworth

G25

22878

n.holdsworth@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Yvette Hutchison

G23

74278

y.a.hutchison@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Silvija Jestrovic

F04

73100

s.jestrovic@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Wallace McDowell

G44

74272

Wallace.B.McDowell@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Michael Pigott

A0.21

74318

m.pigott@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Margaret Shewring

F02

23022

m.e.shewring@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Tim White

G24

72534

t.white@warwick.ac.uk

Dr Nicolas Whybrow

G26

24925

n.whybrow@warwick.ac.uk

Kate Brennan
(Secretary)

G29

23020

C.Brennan@warwick.ac.uk

Ian O'Donoghue
(Technician)

F01

50377

07824541001 (mob)

i.f.c.o-donoghue@warwick.ac.uk

Sarah Shute
(Administrator)

G28

73449

sarah.shute@warwick.ac.uk

To contact the department in an emergency please email t.white@warwick.ac.uk or phone 07764759562

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Maps

Campus
Downloadable pdf - http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/campusmap/144013_campusmapcomms-0912-web.pdf
interactive web map - http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/about/visiting/maps/interactive


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Communication

Email

The primary means by which the department communicates with students is by email.

It is vital that you regularly check you university email address.

Your university address is used to

  • Send feedback
  • Alert you to changes to classes
  • Inform you of library fines
  • Inform you of departmental events and opportunities

If you cannot remember your email address you can look it up here
https://web.warwick.ac.uk/cgi-bin/secure/email.pl


If you need to setup your email for different devices please see here
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/its/servicessupport/email


Course Webpages

Information on all modules is maintained on the course webpages. We are currently reworking the site but the landing page is

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/theatre_s

Undergraduates can navigate to modules by selecting

Current Students  Undergraduate

And then choosing from Year 1, 2 or 3 modules in the right hand menu you can click on the relevant module.

Module pages usually comprise

  • A front page – brief outline, class hours, assessment pattern, contact for convenor
  • Schedule – week by week breakdown of the module (locked for non-Warwick viewers)
  • Reading List – supplementary texts in addition to those found on the schedule
  • Assessement Guidelines – specific information including titles for assessment
  • Assessment Deadlines – link to when assignments are due
  • Generic Assessment Criteria for Practice – standard grade descriptors for practical work
  • Attendance List – staff only page on which attendance is recorded


Library

The Theatre Studies Support Librarian is Richard Perkins

Contact Richard:
r.perkins@warwick.ac.uk 
Telephone: 024 765 22331


Tabula

Tabula is the name for the Student Management and Administration System run by Warwick. We use it to

  • collect assessment submissions
  • monitor attendance
  • schedule tutorials
  • distribute assessment feedback
  • check for plagiarism (through Turnitin)

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Student-Staff learning agreement

This agreement is intended to give students a clear idea of the fundamental elements of what they can expect from the department and of what is expected from them

As a student you will be expected to:

  • Check your Warwick email account on a daily basis, reading emails and responding to them appropriately.

  • Make yourself familiar with the advice for students available online – particularly the student handbook and module outlines which can be found on the department website.

  • Attend all scheduled meetings and classes related to your studies, except in extraordinary circumstances. Should such circumstances arise, you must email the relevant staff member in advance to explain your absence.

  • Arrive fully prepared for all classes having completed any set reading and/or other tasks

  • Participate actively in all learning environments – lectures, seminars and workshops

  • Support the learning of your peers by sharing ideas and engaging constructively in group work

  • Meet all deadlines for assessments except in extraordinary circumstances. Should such circumstances arise you will need to fill in an extension application form asap.

  • Ensure that, should the need arise, you complete and submit all paperwork – requests for extensions, extenuating circumstances forms etc – in full and at the earliest opportunity

  • Raise with your personal tutor AT THE EARLIEST POSSIBLE STAGE any circumstances likely to affect academic work, this includes any special needs or particular religious observances

  • Take full advantage of as many as possible of the many extra-curricular opportunities offered by the department such as practitioner workshops, career events and student research opportunities

  • Remain aware that while you may have outside commitments, your academic work must come first at all times

The Theatre and Performance Studies Department will provide:

  • A personal tutor who will offer guidance on academic progression, pastoral care and career guidance in association with services offered by the university as a whole.

  • A range of academic modules that will focus on your conceptual and critical development.

  • All relevant information regarding both curricular and extra-curricular opportunities offered by the department in particular and the university more widely

  • Clear criteria for assessment along with full and constructive feedback for all assessed work.

  • Notification of staff office hours for student-booked consultations

  • Responses to communications from students will normally happen within two working days. Assessed work will be returned according to the stipulations on Tabula.

The Department regards this teaching and learning agreement as being instrumental in you successfully completing your degree. It should be understood within the context of a fundamental obligation to view your learning in the Department over the course of three years as a shared experience in which you participate in the general exchange of ideas and have a responsibility to engage with and support the learning of your peers


Modules

Undergraduate Programme 2014/15

Year 1 - 120 CATS

Single Honours Students take four 30 CAT modules (all core)
Joint Honours (English and Theatre) take Introduction to Theatre and Performance studies and and can optionally take From Text to Performance (both 30 CAT)
Joint Honours students (French and Theatre, Italian and Theatre) take Introduction to Theatre and Performance Studies (30 CAT)
Those taking German and Theatre Studies take Introduction to Theatre and Performance studies and From Text to Performance (both 30 CAT)

SINGLE HONOURS CORE

CATS

CODE

TITLE

DAY-TIME-LOCATION

CONVENOR

30

TH113-30

Contemporary Performance Practices

Thu 0900-1800 (G53/G55)

Susan Haedicke

30

TH114-30

Introduction to Theatre & Performance Studies

Lecture: Mon 1500-1700 (SO.21)
Seminar A: Wed 0930-1100 (G52)
Seminar B: Wed 1130-1300 (G52)
Seminar C: Fri 1130-1300 (G52)
Seminar D: Fri 1400-1530 (G52)

Wallace McDowell

30

TH115-30

From Text to Performance

Tue 1230-1600 (G51/G52/G53)


Silvija Jestrovic

30

TH116-30

Performance Analysis

Lecture: Fri 0930-1100 (S0.13)
Seminar A: Mon 1000-1130 (G52)
Seminar B: Mon 1145-1315 (G52)

Yvette Hutchison

Students are required to pass all modules in order to proceed to the second year of the course

Year 2 - 120 CATS

Single Honours Students take modules totalling 120 CATS (which may include 30 CATS from other departments - external modules)
Joint Students take modules totalling 30 CATS (and may opt to take a further 30 CATS in the department as external module(s))
External Students may take some modules subject to approval and availability - please contact Tim White in the Summer Term

Students may elect to take one or more IATL interdisciplinary modules as an option, or options, subject to the approval of their Chair of the Department. These modules address topics that are amenable to cross-faculty study, and are designed to enrich single disciplinary approaches.

OPTIONS

CATS

CODE

TITLE

DAY-TIME-LOCATION

CONVENOR

30

TH219

Writing for Performance

Tue 1000-1300 (G55)

Silvija Jestrovic

30

TH205

Theatre in the Community

Fri 0900-1300 (G53)

Saul Hewish

30

TH237

Audio-Visual Avant-Gardes

Mon 0900-1300 (G53)

Michael Pigott

30

TH210

Marketing

Wed 1100-1300 (G56)

Caroline Griffin

30

TH326

Dramaturgy

Tue 1400-1700 (G55)

Susan Haedicke

30

TH241

Medieval & Elizabethan Playing Places & Performances

Mon 1400-1700 (G52)

Margaret Shewring

15

TH229

Pantomime, Culture & Ideology

AUT Fri 1330-1530 (G55)

Jim Davis

15

TH222

Theatre in the African Context

AUT Thu 0930-1130 (G56)

Yvette Hutchison

15

TH240

Religion, Secularity, and Affect in the Modern World

AUT Thu 1200-1400 (G56)

Milija Gluhovic

15

TH235

Wired

AUT Thu 1430-1630 (Edit)

Tim White

15

TH230

Performing Online

SPR Thu 1200-1400(Edit)

Tim White

15

TH226

20th Century Irish Theatre

SPR Fri 1530-1730 (G56)

Wallace McDowell

15

TH234

South African Theatre

SPR Thu 0930-1130 (G56)

Yvette Hutchison

15

TH228

Nineteenth Century Melodrama

SPR 1430-1630 (G52)

Jim Davis

15

TH236

Independent Project

AUT OR SPR - supervised

Tim White


Year 3 - 120 CATS

Single Honours Students take modules totalling 120 CATS (which may include 30 CATS from other departments - external modules) including a core 30 CAT Independent Research Option (written or practice-based) Joint Students take modules totalling 30 CATS (and may opt to take a further 30 CATS in the department as external module(s))
External Students may take some modules subject to approval and availability - please contact Tim White in the Summer Term. Students may elect to take one or more IATL interdisciplinary modules as an option, or options, subject to the approval of their Chair of the Department. These modules address topics that are amenable to cross-faculty study, and are designed to enrich single disciplinary approaches.

OPTIONS

CATS

CODE

TITLE

DAY-TIME-LOCATION

CONVENOR

30

TH329

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH OPTION (IRO)
(CORE FOR SINGLE HONOURS)

Tue 0900-1030 (G53)

Margaret Shewring (Written)
Susan Haedicke (Practice)

30

TH330

Adaptation for Performance

Mon 1400-1700 (G55)

Susan Haedicke

30

TH210

Marketing

Wed 1100-1300 (G56)

Caroline Griffin

30

TH320

Intercultural Theatre Practices

Fri 1330-1530 (G56)

Yvette Hutchison

30

TH319

Interpreting the Theatrical Past: Approaches to Theatre Historiography

Tue 1400-1600 (G56)

Jim Davis

30

TH327

Food and Performance

Tue 1130-1330 (G53)

Tim White

30

TH332

Performing Gender and Sexuality

Thu 1430-1730 (G56)

Wallace McDowell

30

TH331

Design for Shakespeare

Thu 0930-1230 (G52)

Margaret Shewring

15

TH230

Performing Online

SPRING Thu 1200-1400 (Edit)

Tim White


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Staff Research interests

To see research and publication information on staff please refer to the staff pages

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/theatre_s/staff/


School Officers

Head of Department – Prof. Jim Davis (Autumn) / Dr Nicolas Whybrow (Spring-)

MAIPR Director – Dr Milija Gluhovic

MA Theatre Consultancy Director - Dr Margaret Shewring

Director of Undergraduate Studies – Dr Tim White

Director of Graduate Studies – Dr Yvette Hutchison

Director of Research - Prof. Jim Davis (autumn)/

Director of Practice - Dr Susan Haedecke

UG Admissions – Dr Silvija Jestrovic (with support from colleagues)

Exams Officer – Dr Silvija Jestrovic (with support from colleagues)

SSLC – Dr Wallace McDowell

Joint degree co-ordinator - Dr Tim White

International Exchange Officer – Dr Milija Gluhovic

Health and Safety Officer – Ian O'Donoghue

Library Rep – Dr Margaret Shewring

Widening Participation Officer – Dr Wallace McDowell

Careers and Alumni Officer – Dr Nicolas Whybrow

Humanities Research Centre – Dr Margaret Shewring

Research Topic Co-ordinator – Practice - Dr Susan Haedicke / Written - Prof. Jim Davis

Research seminar series co-ordinator – ​ Prof. Jim Davis

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Students' Union

The Students' Union (SU) represents the student body as a unified group. Warwick Students' Union is one of the largest and most active in the country. Respected for its first class facilities, fair trade policy, entertainment programme and 'safe space' environment – the stereotypical boozy Union social scene is only a fraction of what goes on at the SU. The Union is run by students, for students, and takes into account every aspect of being a student.

Renovation
A few years ago, the Union underwent an £11 million renovation; a rebuild project to modernise the Union and make it a vibrant, cosmopolitan and contemporary hub of activity in keeping with the University's proud vision of the future. The brand new Union now consists of new retail outlets, including a deli making fresh baguettes (The Bread Oven), a new cafe (Curiositea) and a new bar, the Terrace Bar, which overlooks the piazza. As well as this, there is still the Student Union pub, The Dirty Duck, attached to the Union building, alongside a large pool room. However, the biggest developments of the refurb were the Copper Rooms: the new venue for SU nights. Popular nights at the SU such as Pop! and Skool Dayz now take place within these two, low-ceilinged large club-like rooms, which also host DJs and bands from all over the country.

Sabbatical Officers
The Union's seven full-time sabbatical officers represent the concerns of the student body on a broad spectrum of issues. They provide a strong independent voice through which to communicate with the University and outside bodies. The Union seeks to provide for a full range of campaigning, academic, cultural, sporting, social, and welfare needs on behalf of the student body at large.

The Student Council
Involvement with the Students' Union is an integral part of the experience of being at Warwick. Members have opportunities to develop a wide range of skills that complement degrees and put them in good stead when seeking employment, with yearly elections for all the Sabbs officers, and most importantly, the SU president. A chance to get students interested in politics at an early age, election week is an exciting time on campus full of campaign posters and emotive pitches for office – the student council elections simply cannot be ignored!

Societies and Sports Federations
Students are often most active within the Union via membership of the Societies and Sports Federations. Warwick Students' Union is able to boast over 250 societies and 75 active sports clubs. This is an impressive number and one that Warwick SU should be proud of. The number of options grows year on year. If there isn't already something you fancy there's the opportunity to set up your own society, along with assistance and encouragement from finance and society officers.

Student Media
Union NorthWarwick also has its own independent student newspaper, 'The Boar', as well as its own radio (Radio Warwick RAW) and TV (Warwick TV ) stations. Both RAW and WTV win awards at national ceremonies on a yearly basis and are both societies that really give your CV a boost if you get involved in them. With over 250 societies to choose from, there is simply no excuse to not get involved in one of them – so take the plunge and take part in anything you want, whether you’re into fine dining or free hugs, there is a Warwick society for you!

Many students surprise themselves by quickly getting very involved in the running of the society, and standing for roles such as Treasurer, Secretary or President of their favourite society. This is a great way to encourage students to take on responsibility and teaches them important organisational and management skills, appropriately contributing to their CV, too.

Involvement within the Union at large can be at any level. Students are automatic members, so you can choose just to play the odd game of Ultimate Frisbee or to go as far as organising the hugely popular Warwick Student Arts Festival, or One World Week, 'the world's largest student run international event'.

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The Data Protection Act

This Act, which came into effect in 2000, stipulates that no personal information can be passed on to others without your permission. It is important that, if you are ill or have serious personal problems, you both provide medical notes (which will be used, if necessary, to excuse late work or other problems) and that you inform your personal tutor, or another member of staff, in writing, if you wish these circumstances to be taken into account in the event of your academic work suffering. Without your permission in each instance, your tutor (or another member of staff) cannot by law use such personal information in your best interests. To let us know about such situations you need to submit a Mitigating Circumstances Form (see below)

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Mobile phone policy

It is generally accepted that mobile phones are to be switched to silent or off during classes.

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Recording Lectures

If you have medical circumstances that require you to record lectures please speak to the person convening the course to explain the situation in advance so that they are aware that they are being recorded.

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Authorised absence

You are required to inform ALL of your tutors, including personal and external tutors, of your absence, the nature of the placement or activity, the duration, and the fact that you have been granted permission by the School to be absent. It is your responsibility to ensure that you catch up with all work missed. Being granted absence is in no way an extenuating circumstance for unsatisfactory performance on the course. If you are absent without informing the staff concerned or, are absent having made a request to be absent and not been granted permission you will be marked as absent and be deemed to have failed to meet monitoring points .The maximum permissible period of authorised absence is two weeks.

Reporting Absence

If you are not present in class you are regarded as absent. In all circumstances you should, out of courtesy to staff and fellow students inform the class convenor as far in advance as possible. The types of absence are
Medical – you obtain medical proof of your unsuitability to attend class and inform the tutor in advance. No monitoring point is awarded

Authorised – you have requested to be absent from class either because of personal circumstances such as attending a funeral or because of an opportunity that the department considers to be beneficial for your career (though the frequency and length of such absences are extremely limited and are determined on a case by case basis – please speak to your personal tutor in advance about this). No monitoring point is awarded

Unauthorised – no prior agreement has been made about your absence and/or the department have not considered it appropriate. A monitoring point is awarded

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Attendance & Monitoring

Attendance at all lecture, seminar, practical and tutorial classes in Theatre Studies is obligatory. Any theatre visits related to your modules are also obligatory. If you are unable to attend because of illness, you should inform the module tutor as soon as possible. Attendance at all classes is deemed to constitute a necessary part of the completion of each module. We are required to report to the Teaching Quality section of the Academic Office annually setting out how we monitor student attendance and progression.

Departments are required to report to the Teaching Quality section of the Academic Office annually setting out how they monitor student attendance and progression. A summary report will be considered by the Academic Quality and Standards Committee. Departments are therefore being asked to identify a ‘monitoring structure’ showing how we will monitor student attendance and progression.

Departments are advised to offer support to students whenever it becomes apparent that they may be experiencing problems. Additionally (as a minimum),

► Where a student has missed three formal “ monitoring points” in one academic year the student’s personal tutor/supervisor should meet with the student to discuss progress and consider referring the student where appropriate to the relevant University Support Service(s).

► Where a student has missed six formal “monitoring points” in one academic year the Director of Graduate/Undergraduate Studies should consider referring the student to the Continuation of Registration as set out in The Regulation on Student registration attendance and progress 13. The department may wish to seek advice on this from their Faculty Secretary or the Academic Office.

► Where a student has missed eight formal “ monitoring points” in one academic year the Department or the Academic Registrar will need to invoke the process outlined in the Regulation on Student Registration, Attendance and Progress.


Departmental contact responsible for submission of monitoring reports:

Dr Tim White

This monitoring structure applies to the following courses:

  • BA in Theatre and Performance Studies (Director of Undergraduate Studies: Tim White)

1st Years

Term 1

1. Attendance at all induction events in Week 1

2. Initial meeting with personal Tutor in Week 2

3. Attendance at designated classes in week 4

4. Attendance at designated classes in week 8

5. Submission of all required work

Term 2

1. Attendance at designated classes in week 4

2. Attendance at designated classes in week 8

3. Submission of all required work

4. Attendance at Personal Tutor meetings

Term 3

1. Submission of options form for 2014/5

2. Submission of all required work

3. Attendance at all exams

2nd & 3rd Years

Term 1

1. Attendance at Personal Tutor meeting in Week 5

2. Attendance at designated classes in week 4

3. Attendance at designated classes in week 8

4. Submission of all required work

Term 2

1. Attendance at Personal Tutor meeting in Week 5

2. Attendance at designated classes in week 4

3. Attendance at designated classes in week 8

4. Submission of all required work

Term 3

1. Completion of Options Form (Yr 2) / Participation in IRO Festival (Yr3)

2. Attendance at designated classes in week 3

3. Submission of all required work

4. Attendance at all exams

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Progress/Attendance/Withdrawal

University guidelines on progress, attendance and withdrawal mechanisms can be found here

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/reg36registrationattendanceprogress

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Options

In years 2 and 3 you will be required to select optional modules (only the Independent Research Option worth 30 CATS in Year 3 is a core or required module). The department organises this process as follows:
1. Annoucement of Options Meetings
2. Publication of modules available for the following year including timetable
3. Options meeting in which students can seek clarification on modules

4. Submission of options online by agreed deadline

5. Publication of class lists for following year

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TIMETABLES

1st_year_2014-15-octv1.png

2nd_year_2014-aut_octv1.png

2nd_year_2015-spr_octv1.png


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Term Dates

2014/2015

Autumn Term Monday 29 September 2014 – Saturday 6 December 2014

Spring Term Monday 5 January 2015 – Saturday 14 March 2015

Summer Term Monday 20 April 2015 – Saturday 27 June 2015

2015/2016

Autumn Term Monday 5 October 2015 – Saturday 12 December 2015

Spring Term Monday 11 January 2016 – Saturday 19 March 2016

Summer Term Monday 25 April 2016 – Saturday 2 July 2016

2016/2017

Autumn Term Monday 3 October 2016 – Saturday 10 December 2016

Spring Term Monday 9 January 2017 – Saturday 18 March 2017

Summer Term Monday 24 April 2017 – Saturday 1 July 2017

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READING WEEKS

The department has ‘reading weeks’ in week 6 of both Autumn and Spring terms. No classes are held during these weeks

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ASSESSMENT SUBMISSION DEADLINES

The list of assessment deadlines can be found here

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/theatre_s/current/ug/intro/assessment_deadlines


RETURN OF FEEDBACK DEADLINES

1. The University is committed to providing the appropriate support for students to fulfill their potential while at Warwick, as this forms an essential component of the learning experience. The University is also committed to offering a range of mechanisms to support its students in developing the skills they will require both for success in academia and beyond.

2. Assessment is a critical feature of the student’s educational experience. The University aims to ensure that assessment mechanisms used allow students to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have acquired and that these mechanisms are applied fairly and consistently.

3. Two key principles govern the way in which the University issues feedback on assessed work:

Turnaround time for all assessed work

20 University working days maximum turnaround is a universal requirement. If feedback from submitted work is designed to be formative towards performance in a subsequent assessment (including an examination), then the calendar of submission/return of coursework should be such as to ensure that the student has a realistic opportunity to reflect on their learning from that feedback in the subsequent assessment.

Communication

In order to ensure that both staff and students have clear expectations, academic departments will communicate to students the structure of assessments, specific deadlines for individual pieces of work and, crucially, the dates on which assessed work will be returned to students with feedback, which should be no later than 20 University working days after the date of submission in line with this policy. All dates associated with assessment will be communicated to students via departmental handbooks at the start of each academic year.

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Assessment Methods

MODES OF ASSESSMENT

1. Dissertation

A written piece of work that distinguishes itself from an essay by virtue of the fact that

  1. the topic is determined by the student and agreed by a supervisor

  2. the student works with a supervisor and is expected to submit a draft version for comment by the supervisor by an agreed date prior to final submission

  3. the submission has certain presentational requirements that require it to be presented in hard copy (though it may additionally be submissted electronically)

Presently only the written pathway of the IRO uses a dissertation. The word length of this is in accordance with the rationalisation of CATS to words (see table 1) ie 10,000 words for 100% of a 30 CAT module

All dissertations are second-marked

Hand in and efeedback

2. Essay

A written piece of work, most usually from 1500 to 5000 words in length (and weighted according to table 1 below) that responds to questions set by the module convenor. Structure, referencing and bibliographic competencies are assessed as part of the submission.

Ebsubmission & Efeedback

3. Written Portfolio

A written piece of work consisting of two or more elements, typically short précis of 500-1000 words per element. The portfolio is intended to assess the ability of students to provide summaries or encapsulate ideas and practices (and has a briefing or position paper as its real-world equivalent). Usually, an initial element or elements of the portfolio are submitted for feedback (not a mark). The final submission consists of all elements and receives one mark.

Ebsubmission & Efeedback

4.Written Exam

A written test held under the auspices of the University and usually scheduled in May/June. The length of the exam in relation to percentage and CATS is shown in Table 2. Exams may be ‘ seen’ (questions circulated some time in advance), ‘takeaway (questions provided a few days before the exam) or unseen (the student has no idea what the questions will be.

Submitted at the end of the exam. Feedback on request

5.Seminar Contributions

This is a portmanteau mode, embracing both online responses to seminars (on a blog or forum, for example) as well as written accounts of seminar presentations (eg as used in Melodrama). The reason this is distinct from Assessed Seminar Presentations is that it is primarily a written exercise (and therefore can be moderated outside of the classroom).

Esubmission (posting of url as cover sheet if required) and efeedback

6.Research Poster

There is only one instance of this currently in use (ITTPS – Year 1) yet it is sufficiently distinct that it has not been subsumed in other modes. Students are required to utilise design skills to create a poster of uniform size that conveys an idea or practice.

No submission (though posters should be photographed for reference). Efeedback.

7.Critical review

Though assigned a separate mark, the critical review compliments another assessment point, whether practice or presentation. The review does adhere to word count guidelines (see Table 1) though does not have to be in essay form and can be three-dimensional or mixed-media. Consequently esubmission should be at the very least a cover sheet (acknowledging that the non-digital artefact has been submitted) but may be online if the review is an electronic document.

Though the prior work on which the critical review is based may be a group project, critical reviews are individual submissions.

Esubmission (various) and efeedback

8.Assessed Seminar Presentation

Working individually or in groups students present a topic to the class and the convenor and moderator. The presentations are allotted times based on the size of the group and specific criteria (on the module’s webpage) will identify any further considerations to be taken into account (eg discussion time, accompanying handouts etc). Presentations are recorded on video (both for the external examiner and to document the equal apportioning of time to groups)

No submission. Efeedback

9.Practice-based project

This somewhat ungainly formulation is the consequence of conflating hybrid and practical pathways of the IRO and wishing to allow for works that might be performances or equally exhibitions, websites or other curatorial projects that distinguish them from written dissertations.

No submission. Efeedback

10.Project-based assessment

This allows for submissions that may be three-dimensional, virtual, performed or written ie a response to an open brief. In order for this to be coherent there has to be some standardisation of the assessment even if the submission could be anything therefore the work needs to be able to be viewed / read / browsed at a later date that does not require the presence of a marker and moderator at a specific time.

Cover sheet submission. Efeedback

11.Practice-based portfolio

This is the practical equivalent of the written portfolio. There is only one mark awarded for two or more practical elements that constitute the portfolio. Interim feedback (verbal or written) may be given. The final mark and feedback aggregates the work of all elements.

No submission. Efeedback

12.Practical Exam

All Practical Exams will be recorded on video (excluding Community) and have a second marker. Where possible moderation of the work should occur on the day of the performance.

Table 1 – Word length calculator

Assessment Parity 2014

Word length

15 CAT

30 CAT

500

10.00%

5.00%

1000

20.00%

10.00%

1500

30.00%

15.00%

2000

40.00%

20.00%

2500

50.00%

25.00%

3000

60.00%

30.00%

3500

70.00%

35.00%

4000

80.00%

40.00%

4500

90.00%

45.00%

5000

100.00%

50.00%

5500

 

55.00%

6000

 

60.00%

6500

 

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7000

 

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Table 2 exam length calculator

Exam length

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30 CAT

1.5

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3

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17 point scale

The 17 Grade Point Marking Scale: Table with marking scale and descriptors.

With the exception of the top and bottom marks the descriptors cover a range of marks, with the location within each group dependent on the extent to which the elements in the descriptor are met.


Marking

to be


Out of 17

Class

scale

converted to this mark

descriptor










Exceptional command of the subject, including

17




material which ranges well beyond that covered



Excellent

96

in lectures/classes. Work of exceptional insight,



1st


bringing new perspectives to bear on the





material, or developing new knowledge or





techniques. Achieves or is close to publishable





standard.





Very high quality work, with full understanding of

16

First

High 1st

89

the subject matter.





Work that demonstrates intellectual maturity,





and is perceptive with highly developed

15


Mid 1st

81

organisation.





An ambitious project carried out successfully,





with sophisticated handling of primary and

14




secondary material, reasoned, analytic



Low 1st

74

argument.





Some degree of originality, independent





research and thought.



High 2.1

68

Highly competent in organisation and

13




presentation, evidence of individual research;


Upper




12

Second

Mid 2.1

65

appropriate and intelligent use of primary and





secondary material, good understanding of



Low 2.1

62

subject matter allied with perceptive analysis.

11


High 2.2

58

Conscientious work, attentive to subject matter

10




and title/task set; a focused response to the task


Lower

Mid 2.2

55

demonstrating good knowledge, balanced more

9

Second



towards the descriptive than the analytical.





Good knowledge, reasonable understanding of

8


Low 2.2

52

material and task. Descriptive rather than





analytical.



High 3rd

48

Some relevant knowledge, some accurate

7

Third

Mid 3rd

45

repetition of lecture/class notes/work. Partial or

6


Low 3rd

42

pedestrian description.

5




Work does not meet standards required for the

4


High Fail


appropriate stage of an Honours degree, albeit



(near miss)

38

with some basic understanding of relevant





concepts an techniques.


Fail



Ineptitude in knowledge, structure,

3


Fail

25

academic/professional practice





Failure or inability to answer the





question/respond to the task.

2


Low Fail

12

No evidence of basic understanding of relevant





concepts/techniques





Work of no merit

1

Zero

Zero

0

OR Absent, work not submitted, penalty in some misconduct cases







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Generic Assessment Criteria for Practice within Theatre/Performance Studies

Practice is assessed in an evaluation of processes and projects. The underlying principle, as with all assessment of theatre practice within the School, is that you are assessed on the demonstration of your understanding through practice. Key criteria of assessment are:

  • Good practice. Your response to the basic disciplines and demands of project-based, group work: attendance, punctuality, a commitment and willingness to share responsibility with other members of the group.

  • The initiation, negotiation and realisation of ideas in a collaborative group process. In this context there may also be an assessment of the execution of specific responsibilities allocated by the tutor or agreed between the tutor and the group.

  • Your demonstration, through your practice, of an understanding of the specific concepts, issues and/or practices towards which the module directs and focuses your attention.

Practical Grade Descriptors

Whilst practical work takes many forms its general grading subscribes to the following criteria. These are divided into two basic categories whose functioning interlocks in practice.

1. Initiation, negotiation and realisation of performance material

Practice will be evaluated on the basis of:

the understanding shown of performance convention and form
the appropriate and imaginative use of performance techniques as a means by which to explore source material
the ability to select and synthesise material arising out of a practical working process
the ability to select appropriate means of communicating performance material to specified audiences
the ability to produce a performance ‘text’ suitable for its context
evidence of an engagement with relevant theoretical concepts and issues
2. Engagement with process and performance

Participants in practical work will be assessed on the basis of:

individual initiative and contribution within a group process
commitment to the development and articulation of ideas offered by other group members
the ability, within a group situation, to offer and respond to constructive criticism and analysis of the work in progress
the ability to contribute to the development of the overall discipline of the work, in particular to allocate appropriate time and resources
the ability to review practice critically and to provide appropriate documentation where required
Classification of practice is premised on the greater or lesser qualitative fulfilment of the listed criteria. Individual modules (or, indeed, practical tasks set within modules) may also have their own specific criteria, to which participants will be alerted by tutors as required. The grade descriptors should be read, then, as variables of the criteria outlined.

96 (excellent 1st)
Exceptional command of subject-matter, concepts and techniques, including material which ranges well beyond that covered in practical sessions. Work of exceptional insight, bringing new perspectives to bear on the material in question, or developing new knowledge or techniques. A very high level of achievement commensurate with the given practical brief will be evident. The work will also reveal a highly effective interaction of practice and theory.

74, 81, 89 (low, mid, high 1st)
Very high quality work, with full understanding of subject-matter, concepts and techniques. Work that demonstrates high practical intelligence and maturity, and is perceptive with highly developed organisation. An ambitious project carried out successfully, with sophisticated handling of primary and secondary material. Some degree of originality, independent research, thought and practical ability.

62, 65, 68 (low, mid, high 2.1)
Highly competent in organisation and presentation, evidence of originality and independence of thought and practice may be in evidence, as well as a sound interaction of theory and practice. Appropriate and intelligent practical use of primary and secondary material, good understanding of subject-matter allied with perceptive practical analysis and highly adept application of concepts and techniques.

52, 55, 58 (low, mid, high 2.2)
Conscientious work, attentive to subject-matter and practical tasks set; a focused response to tasks, demonstrating good levels of knowledge, balanced more towards the application of predictable rather than innovative and practically astute concepts and techniques. Some indication of theory and practice interacting successfully will be evident.

42, 45, 48 (low, mid, high 3rd)
Some relevant knowledge, some accurate re-presentation of work undertaken in practical classes. Competence in the fulfilment of key criteria will reveal significant inadequacies. Understanding of the practical brief is likely to be misconceived in some way, leading to an unsatisfactory outcome. Levels of engagement and commitment to the work will be low.

38 (high fail)
Work does not meet standards required for the appropriate stage of an honours degree, albeit with some basic understanding of relevant concepts and techniques.

12, 25 (fail, low fail)
The work fails to address and fulfil the criteria outlined. Little or no sign of understanding, engagement or commitment to the task in hand. Ineptitude in knowledge, structure, academic/professional practice. No evidence of basic understanding of relevant concepts and techniques.

0 (zero)
Work of no merit. OR Absent, work not submitted, penalty in some misconduct cases.

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Extension Requests

All requests for an extension are to be submitted via this form

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/theatre_s/current/ug/assignment_extension_form/

Assignment Extension Form

You should use this form to request additional time to complete a particular assignment. If you wish to have your circumstances considered for mitigation by the Exam Board and/or the Student Progress Committee you need to submit a Mitigating Circumstances Form.

Top of Form

Request for an assignment extension

All requests for an assignment extension must be made via this form at least 24 hours before the due date unless there are exceptional circumstances. Essay extensions may be requested:

1 On grounds of ill health. Whenever possible, a doctor’s note should be supplied.
2. On compassionate grounds.
3. For other exceptional circumstances.

In making a request for an assignment extension, please state under which of the three above headings the request is being made. In addition, please provide written details giving the background to the request. Students who do not wish to give written details on grounds of confidentiality must first discuss their request for an essay extension with their personal tutor and indicate this on the form

If a written request for an assignment extension is refused, students may approach their personal tutor to ascertain whether he or she would support an appeal against the decision.

We aim to notify you of the outcome of your request within 24 hours (though if the request is made over a weekend the response may not be until the next working day).

Bottom of Form

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Late submission Policy

All work handed in late without an agreed extension will incur a 5% per working day penalty

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Return of marks

All feedback (and marks where given) will be returned within 20 working days. In the case of third year work in the summer term the marks and feedback may be returned after the exam board has met as all marks are not final until agreed by the external examiner.

The standard feedback form for the department is shown below:

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Word Count

The department adheres to a 10% +/- policy with regard to word count. The total length of the submission excluding footnotes and bibliography should be within 10% of the specified length eg a 2,000 word essay should be between 1,800 and 2,200 words. Submissions outside of this range are liable to be penalised.

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Progressing from the first year

Progression into the second year of the degree is determined at the First Year Board of Examiners Meetings

See First Year Boards of Examiners’ Conventions

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/aro/dar/quality/categories/examinations/conventions/fyboe

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Pastoral Care and Support

STUDENT SUPPORT & DEVELOPMENT

Introduction

Whilst we hope that your time at Warwick will be positive and successful, we recognise that at different stages you may need some support to enable you to take full advantage of what being a student at Warwick can bring.

Listed below are details regarding some of the student support and development services that are available at Warwick. If you don’t find what you are looking for, feel free to contact the Student Support and Development Reception which is located on the Ground Floor of University House.

Student Support Services website

Student Support and Residential Life

Location: Ground Floor, University House

Email: seniorwarden@warwick.ac.uk

Telephone: +44 (0) 24 765 23465

Student Support and Residential Life brings together Residential Life, Mental Health, links with Campus Health Services, the Nursery and first-point student support. Urgent queries and cases that require a rapid response should now be sent to the Student Support and Residential Life Office in the first instance. This team works closely with the student support team within the International Office and Advice &Welfare Services in the Students’ Union.

The different parts of this division are shown below:

Residential Life

Location: Ground Floor, University House

Email: seniorwarden@warwick.ac.uk

Telephone: +44 (0) 24 765 23465

Every campus residence has residential staff within it who are there to provide support to and development opportunities for students in their areas. In addition they are there to ensure that residences provide a safe and comfortable place to live and study and have responsibility for enforcing discipline on the rare occasions it is required. Students living off campus will be told if they have any residential staff living in their area. If not, they can contact Warwick Accommodation if they have issues regarding their accommodation, and the Student Support and Residential Life Office or any service listed below for other issues.

Mental Health

Location: Ground Floor, University House

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/student-support-services/mental_health

The Student Mental Health Co-ordinators provide information, support and, if needed, access to other services for students who have mental health problems. They work closely with other Student Support Services and in liaison with Health Professionals to ensure students receive the support needed to help them to manage their studies and life at university.

Students are encouraged to disclose their mental health issues either at enrolment or at any time afterwards so that they can actively take part in how best to manage any difficulties that may arise.

Nursery

Location: Westwood Campus

Telephone: 024 765 23389

Email: nurseryenquiries@warwick.ac.uk

Web: go.warwick.ac.uk/nursery

The Nursery sits within the division of Student Support and Residential Life to enable better integration of approaches to services for children and families. The Nursery operates as a separate unit and we are looking forward to the development of the new expanded nursery as it takes shape over the coming year. Registered for 47 children aged between 3 months and 4 years, the University Nursery is based on Westwood campus with a dedicated baby unit for 15 under twos and a larger “pre-school” unit for 2, 3 and 4 year olds. Registered with OFSTED, we accept 3 and 4 year olds eligible for LEA funding, as well as employer-based childcare vouchers.

The Nursery provides a welcoming, safe, stimulating and challenging environment, providing for children’s social, emotional, physical and moral development to enable them to grow and develop to their full potential. We strive to create an atmosphere of working in partnership with parents and carers so that the children are happy to attend Nursery and you feel confident about leaving your child in our care.

We believe that children learn best through play. In a Nursery as unique as ours, where children can experience as many as 20 different languages and cultures in the course of a normal day, we feel that by allowing the children to express themselves through their play and some carefully structured activities we are allowing them to develop at a pace that makes sense to them.

The Health Centre

Location: Health Centre Road, Main Campus

Telephone: 024 76 524 888

Web: http://www.uwhc.org.uk/

There are two medical practices based at the University Health Centre providing a full range of general practitioner services for registered patients. The Health Centre has both male and female doctors (although a doctor will not be at the centre throughout the opening times), Nurse Practitioners and Practice Nurses. Both practices run an appointments system for consultations with the doctors and the nurses.

The Health Centre offers sexual health and contraceptive clinics, travel clinics and immunisation facilities. There are also physiotherapy sessions at the health centre to which doctors can refer patients.

If ill, registered patients will be given an appointment at the Health Centre as soon as possible. If the Health Centre is closed, arrangements can be made for an emergency consultation. Full information is provided when students register with one of the GP practices.

International Students resident here on courses lasting more than three months are entitled to full NHS (National Health Service) facilities. The NHS does not cover students on courses of less than three months, unless they come from a country, which has a reciprocal arrangement with the UK, or from the EEA and have an European Health Card, and then only if the need for treatment arises while the student is resident in the UK.

Students on courses of study of less than three months in duration are advised to take out private medical insurance before they arrive in the UK where possible.

Registering with the Health Centre

To use the Health Centre, you must register with them as soon as you arrive at University. In an emergency, the Health Centre may be able assist non-registered students. Students who are resident on campus or within the catchment area of south-west Coventry are strongly advised to register with the Health Centre on campus (Please note, Leamington Spa does not fall within the catchment area). Students resident outside this area are advised to register with a practice close to where they are living (www.nhs.uk/englandcan help find a local doctor, dentist, optician, pharmacist etc).

Non-registration with a doctor may cause problems if you are ill or you need a doctor in an emergency.

New students living on campus or within the South West area of Coventry should register with the Health Centre during enrolment week in the Students’ Union Building North. You will need to provide the following information to register:

  • · your NHS number(bring your NHS Medical Card) if you have lived in this country before (essential).

  • · the name and address of your present (most recent) GP in this country

  • · Details of any immunisations you have had and any past medical history

  • Many students from overseas have been to British Boarding Schools or lived in this country before and would have been registered with a GP then – you must ensure that you bring with you your NHS number and name of the GP practice you were registered with.

Senior Tutor

Location: Ground Floor, University House

Email: seniortutor@warwick.ac.uk

Web: go.warwick.ac.uk/seniortutor

For guidance and advice on academic matters which you have not been able to resolve with either your personal tutor or your departmental Senior Tutor, you may contact the University’s Senior Tutor who offers an important service to students. See:go.warwick.ac.uk/seniortutor 

The Senior Tutor liaises with closely with both the Personal Tutor system and student support and development services on campus.

University Counselling Service

Location: Westwood House, Westwood Campus

Email:Counselling@warwick.ac.uk

Web: go.warwick.ac.uk/counselling

The University Counselling Service has a number of professionally trained counsellors who offer a confidential service to students who feel that emotional or psychological problems are affecting their ability to study or function properly whilst at the university. Students may be seen individually or in groups. The service also organises single session groups on study skills, time management and stress management throughout the academic year.

For more information on the service and resources such as self help material and email counselling see our website

at:go.warwick.ac.uk/counselling

University Disability Services

Location: Ground Floor, University House

Email: disability@warwick.ac.uk

Telephone: 024 765 73734

Web: go.warwick.ac.uk/disability

Disability Services is part of the Student Development and Diversity Division. We advise and provide services for students who can define as 'disabled' under the Disability Discrimination Act. This includes physical and sensory impairments, learning differences (e.g. dyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia), autistic spectrum conditions, mental health difficulties, 'unseen' conditions (e.g.asthma, epilepsy, diabetes, heart conditions), and other conditions (e.g. CFS, ME) for example.

We encourage applicants and students to notify us on application, enrolment or at any time later of a disability, learning difference or other condition in order that we can provide advice and services to facilitate study at the University. We can also advise on whether individual circumstances are definable as a 'disability' under the law and thus whether students are entitled to have reasonable adjustments made for their studies. Information provided to Disability Services is held in confidence and is only shared with written agreement. We do encourage information sharing to enable the university to make any reasonable adjustments required.

For further information or advice, including advice on Disabled Students Allowances, please contact disability@warwick.ac.uk, telephone the Disability Co-ordinator on 02476 573734 or visit the website:

go.warwick.ac.uk/disability.

The International Office

Location: First Floor, University House

Telephone: +44 (0)24 765 23706

Web: go.warwick.ac.uk/international

The International Office warmly welcomes all new international students to the University of Warwick.

We are a friendly team of experienced staff, here to support all EU and overseas students during your studies at the University of Warwick. We would like you to come and see us if you have queries or difficulties about anything during your stay. We run the annual Orientation induction programme for new international students, and throughout the year we help with queries about police registration, banking and student status letters. We also work pro-actively to give you opportunities to improve your student experience at Warwick by organising a programme of cultural days out and social events for students and families and administering the HOST programme (a national programme enabling overseas students to stay with families across the UK). We have a team of qualified advisers who provide free, confidential immigration advice and assistance. We provide advice on matters such as extending your visa, travelling abroad and working visas and regulations.

We also support foundation, visiting and exchange students who are here under Erasmus partnerships or any other of the wide range of exchange agreements and visiting programmes (including JYA).

As well as dedicated student support staff, we have regional teams who are responsible for students from particular areas of the world. You may have met some of these staff before at exhibitions or at pre-departure receptions or school visits, and you are very welcome to refer to your individual contact after you arrive.

Our office is situated on the first floor of University House and is open from 9am to 5pm Monday to Thursday and 9am to 4pm on Fridays (tel: +44 (0)24 765 23706).

The Chaplaincy

Location: Main Campus (near Arts Centre)

Web: go.warwick.ac.uk/chaplaincy

At the heart of central campus, the Chaplaincy is a vibrant space open to all members of the University community. You can come here for meetings, to relax or study together, enjoy light refreshments, or spend time in public worship or quiet thought. It’s a popular gathering place that welcomes students of any or no faith.

The Chaplaincy is home to the Anglican, Roman Catholic, Free Church and Jewish chaplains, who are always glad to meet students socially and pastorally. As a valued part of the University’s Welfare network, the chaplains offer everyone a sympathetic ear in total confidence. The University also has a dedicated Islamic Prayer Hall immediately adjacent to the Chaplaincy building.

Students’ Union Advice and Welfare Services

Location: Students’ Union North

Web: http://www.sunion.warwick.ac.uk/portal/advice/

Advice and Welfare Services is a confidential Students’ Union service and is independent of the University. We can give information and advice on many areas of University life including:

  • · Accommodation and housing

  • · Problems with your course, lecturer, supervisor or department

  • · Money and debt problems

  • · Support and representation with complaints, appeals, and disciplinary matters

  • · Legal and police problems

  • · Consumer problems

  • · Immigration advice

  • I If you are not sure who to talk to or where to get advice try Advice and Welfare Services first. If it is not us we probably know who the right person is and can help put you in touch.

 http://www.sunion.warwick.ac.uk/portal/advice/

The University and Students' Union also takes its responsibilities for Equality and Diversity and the eradication of Bullying and Harassment very seriously. The relevant web pages are listed below: 

Equality and Diversity:

go.warwick.ac.uk/equalops

Bullying and Harassment:

go.warwick.ac.uk/harrassmentguidelines

Sexual, Racial and Personal Harassment

The University and the Students’ Union regard all forms of harassment as unacceptable and are prepared to take disciplinary action against offenders. Both the University and the Students’ Union are committed to creating a community that is free from harassment and discrimination. Sexual, racial and personal harassment can seriously worsen conditions for staff and students at the University and may also, in certain cases, be unlawful.

The Sexual, Racial and Personal Harassment: Guidelines for Students website, go.warwick.ac.uk/harassmentguidelines, has the University’s statement of equal opportunities and full contact detail s for advice and assistance including:

University Senior Tutor and Counselling Service, telephone 024 7652 3761 or extension 23761

Students’ Union Advice and Welfare Services, telephone 024 7657 2824 or extension 72824

Welfare and Equal Opportunities Officer (Students’ Union sabbatical officer), telephone 024 7657 2778 or extension 72778

Nightline (please note that Nightline is a listening service and will not offer advice), 9pm-9am, telephone 024 7641 7668 or extension 22199

Chaplaincy, telephone 024 7652 3519 or extension 23519

Online Social Networking Sites

The use of online social networking sites (e.g. Facebook, Myspace, Beebo etc) has become a very significant part of the lives for many people. They provide a very positive way to keep in touch with people in different places, share common interests, exchange ideas, thoughts and content on academic matters, and to have fun.

There have been a number of examples where these services have been used for less positive reasons and it is because of this we offer these words of guidance:

  • Ensure that you avoid using language which would be deemed to be offensive to others in a face-to-face setting as the impact on individuals is just the same.

  • Avoid allowing the formation of an online group from isolating or victimising your fellow students or academic colleagues. That may not be your intention but if used carelessly it could be the impact that is achieved.

  • Avoid using such services in classes unless your tutor has given the group express permission to do so.

  • Please ensure that you never use such sites for accessing or sharing illegal content.

We encourage students to make use of such services. However, students should also be aware that the University will take seriously any occasions where the services are used inappropriately. If occasions of what might be read to be online bullying or harassment to students or staff are reported they will be dealt with in the same way as if it took place in a face-to-face setting. Information on the University’s acceptable use policy for IT and its disciplinary regulations can be found at the following sites:

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ACADEMIC ADVICE & SUPPORT

Plagiarism

When you present the words or ideas of another as if they were your own you are plagiarising. Plagiarism is cheating. When you quote directly or summarise in your own words the ideas of someone else, you must acknowledge this. You do so by making a citation or reference within your text to your source materials.

What do I do if I’m writing about something that is common sense or I think everybody/my readers will know?

Statements of fact fall into this category and therefore may not need to be acknowledged, unless there is a controversy to report about the date or location of a particular occurrence in which case you are dealing with interpretations of fact or arguments which must always be acknowledged.

Remember the ‘GOLDEN RULE’ of Plagiarism: IF IN DOUBT, ERR ON THE SIDE OF CAUTION BY ACKNOWLEDGING THE SOURCE.

The writing of essays is an important part of the work of Theatre Studies students. It is one way, along with invigilated examinations and practical assessment, by which Theatre Studies tests its students. However it would be a very restricted view which conceived of the testing of students as the only or main purpose of writing essays. The essay provides a disciplined framework through which students can develop their critical faculties and can learn to marshal evidence to support an argument, and present new thoughts or points of view.

During your time in Theatre Studies you will be asked to write essays on a range of subjects. The nature of these subjects will develop over three years. You will be set essays which ask for your response to a play-text, or a performance, or some aspect of theatre history, theory or practice; you will also at times be asked to view the work of a given playwright or theatre practitioner within its social or historical context. In developing your own assessment of plays and productions, you will be expected to research the knowledge that exists and to grapple with the range of critical opinions that have been based on it. Opportunities will also be given for you to define the field of your enquiry, direct the process of your research and to present work that will contain your own original and advanced thought.

The writing of essays is a process of learning. At the outset you are bound to encounter some difficulties, since the essays required by Theatre Studies may be different from the pieces you have written in school. It is important that you discuss your essays with the module tutors and take notice of their comments. Personal tutors will also advise on how to develop this area of your work. Tutors are always ready to set additional non-assessed extra work for students who feel they need more practice, and will advise students who have problems with structure and expression. The content of an essay must find an articulate means of expression. Later on in this document you will find Criteria for Assessment of Essays, plus a guide to levels attained (Grade Descriptors) and a copy of the 17 point marking scheme.

The advance of scholarship is a continuous process which builds on research, ideas and insights from the past and provides material for future scholars. In your essays no one expects you to be definitive. Nor are you expected to be entirely original on subjects such as the Greek theatre, where you have no access to original source material. Much of your work, particularly at the outset, will therefore be derived from secondary sources, i.e. what other people have previously said on the subject. This is a process which is a common part of the work of the greenest novice and the most eminent authority.

In all cases, however, the use of sources must be acknowledged. General reading must be listed at the end of an essay in a BIBLIOGRAPHY. This is an alphabetical list, by author, of everything you have consulted in the course of your preparation. When you list your reading in this way, you have the benefit of demonstrating the range and quality of the work you have done and your tutors will be able to gauge the range of sources you have used, whether you are using them well, and to what extent you are thinking originally. It also serves as a basis on which your tutors can advise on further reading and help you extend the scope of your studies.

Where you have a specific debt to a piece of work, you must acknowledge this either in your main text, or in a footnote/endnote. It is a matter of critical honesty that you acknowledge the source of your information or ideas and this should be done fully so that your tutor can check back on your quotations and citations in their original context.

The proper acknowledgement of sources is particularly important in the case of work submitted for assessment. It is a normal feature of scholarship to utilise the ideas and thoughts of others in your work but it is dishonest to present ideas and thoughts as your own when they are not. It is important that you do not transpose quotations from sources into your own words without acknowledgement and it is insufficient to list those sources in your bibliography. You must never copy out sections of other people's work and insert them into your essay without marking your debt in quotation marks and providing a full reference.

The University requires us to bring to the notice of all students Regulation 12, which defines cheating in a University Test as 'an attempt to benefit one, or another, by deceit or fraud'. The University regards plagiarism, or the unacknowledged use of other people's ideas and material, as cheating. If a tutor detects plagiarism in an essay, he or she will report the matter to the Chair of Theatre Studies. The Chair may, after hearing the case, impose a penalty of a nil mark for the essay in question. This can have serious consequences for first-year results. In the case of second and third-year students, the matter may go to a Senate disciplinary committee, which has the power to award a mark of zero for the module in question.

Deliberate plagiarism is, thankfully, a rare event. But it is important that, when you make notes during your research and copy quotations out of books and journals, you record the source fully in your notes at that time. Many of us have lost the use of important pieces of material because we have failed to do this and could not remember later the source of the quotation. It is important that you do not leave essays to the last minute and run into the temptation of rehashing tracts of undigested secondary source material in the essay. The habit of making full and appropriate acknowledgement of all sources used and supplying full bibliographies should be instituted from your earliest work.

When you summarise, paraphrase or quote a source you must cite the original author.

Direct quotations or Embedded quotations
< /strong>This is where you quote the phrase/passage in its entirety, acknowledging the source fully. An embedded quotation is where you use some of the author’s words, but place them in the context of your own sentence, splitting up the quotation as you do so. Quotations of a single line or part of a line can be ‘run-on’ in the main body of your text – separated with the use of single quotation marks.

Paraphrasing
< /strong>Paraphrasing is a way of expressing another person’s ideas in your own words. It is more sophisticated than summarising because it involves an element of interpretation where you are the ‘ mediator’ between the original author and the reader. Paraphrasing is a really useful way of livening up your writing. Avoid mechanical word for word substitution or replicating exactly the sentence construction of the original author – you might as well quote directly if you are doing this. Make sure that somewhere you specify in your paraphrase where the idea has come from.

Summarising is to present a succinct version of the original source, restated in your own words where possible, which presents the author’s main idea or main argument only.

Additional resource on Plagiarism

Avoiding Plagiarism: This is an online course on the definition and consequences of plagiarism and on how to avoid involuntary plagiarism. It includes an online test for self-study, and requires Adobe Flash to operate it.

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Grammar Advice

Grammar: Possessives, Plurals and Abbreviations: [---s], [---‘s], [---s’]

[---s] denotes plural.

e.g. Twelve texts.

[---‘s] and [---s’] denote possession or abbreviation

e.g. Sam’s text = possessive

Eurpides’ text = possessive of a word which already ends in s. (although some people prefer to add an extra s as well:Eurpides’s text)

The playwrights' plays = possessive of a word which already ends in s because it is a plural.
< /em>Sam’s cold = abbreviation of Sam is cold.

The possessive form of words ending in [-y] is usually [-y’s ]
The [-y] becomes [-ies] only in a plural form.
e.g. The city’s last hope= possessive

A tale of two cities= plural
E xception: [Its], [It’s], [their]

{Its]denotes possessive. NOTE: No apostrophe!
e .g. “The dog hung its head in shame.”

Abbreviation is regular.
e .g. It’s cold = abbreviation of It is cold.

The plural of [its], of course, is [their].

Grammar: To and Too
: To is a preposition
 I’m going to the library.
 To is part of a verb in the infinitive:
n I’m going to work hard this year.
< /em>Too is a comparative adjective/ adverb (depending on whether it qualifies an adjective or an adverb):
Comparative adjective: It is too cold to work.
C omparative adverb: It was too fast to see.

Grammar: Hyphenation of compound adjectives
Hyphenate compound adjectives. (A compound adjective is one which is composed of two words.)
e.g. In fifth-century Athens … (Hyphenated: ‘fifth-century’ is a compound adjective describing the noun ‘Athens.’) In the fifth century, Athens … (Un-hyphenated ‘fifth’ is an adjective describing the noun ‘ century.’)

Grammar: Effect/Affect
Note that in most cases ‘effect’ is a noun and ‘ affect’ is a verb. (Although ‘effect’ does occur as a verb in a certain less usual use: e.g. to effect a change = to cause a change to happen.)

Punctuation and Layout

Punctuation and layout are important bearers of meaning. They not only enable effective communication, they also indicate to the reader a structure of thought. This structure is itself part of the meaning of a text and is therefore a crucial element of the reader’s ability to understand the text. It is important, therefore, to use commas, paragraph divisions etc. very precisely in order to indicate sub-clauses and conceptual units respectively. Above all, you should always meticulously proof-read your final draft with a view to ensuring that the way in which you have structured your work on the page does accurately reflect what you are trying to communicate to the reader.

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Citations – MLA

The School of Theatre and Performance has adopted the guidelines of the Modern Language Association (MLA) for use by students in all formal writing assignments submitted in support of their course. This includes all undergraduate and MAIPR essays, projects, and dissertations. In short all formal assignments should be submitted in this format. Note: Students enrolling from 2011-2012 shall follow MLA while students registered prior to autumn 2011 may elect to use the previous system (MHRA).

The MLA publishes two authoritative explanations of MLA style: the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th edition, and the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. We are using the Handbook which has been developed especially for students, and recommend buying your own paperback copy of this book, available in the campus bookstore as well as on line. When you buy a copy of the seventh edition, you also get access to the website on line that supports the handbook.

How important is it to follow this (or any system) and why?
It is considered very important by your teachers and will affect your final marks if not employed carefully in your work. The reason is that citation and documentation is the major way we show our sources, give credit to other researchers, and set up a way for others to follow up on our work. The MLAHandbookpoints out: ‘Everytime you write a research paper, you enter into a community of writers and scholars’. That means you write not only to show your own scholarship but for other readers who may want to follow up on your research. In addition, it is a matter of critical honesty that you acknowledge the source of your information or ideas. Think about it in three ways:

  • You are helping a hypothetical reader find/verify your work (your tutor in the first instance)

  • You are crediting some other scholar or person who deserves it.

  • You are using a kind of system or code that will consistently present your information.

Getting Started:
 The advice given here is a supplement to the MLA Handbook. It highlights and clarifies some matters of direct concern to theatre and performance scholars. It is not exhaustive, and you should consult the Handbookfrequently to make sure you are using the correct form. It is now in its seventh edition, and you should be careful to work only with this edition as changes are made every time a new edition appears (for instance, a new easier way of citing on line sources in put forward only in the seventh edition). The Handbook uses a decimal system to provide a really extensive Table of Contents and easier way to find topics. We will refer to that system in parentheses throughout this document where appropriate and urge you to familiarize yourself with this way of consulting the Handbook (5.6 for example is on ‘Citing Web Publications’)

Some of the guidelines here are specific to the School of Theatre and Performance, and may differ in some regards from the Handbook. When in doubt, this Guide trumps the Handbook. For example, the MLA Handbookis written from a North American perspective, and so it uses double quotation marks and punctuation within the mark: “It uses double quotation marks and punctuation within the mark.” Most British publications, however, use single quotation marks with the final punctuation outside the marks: ‘Most British publications use single quotation marks’. Our students must use the British system. In all other matters concerning quotations, see the MLA Handbook 3.7.Also, students must include the full URLwhen citing from the web (see examples below).

Formatting the paper:
Type and print your work on one side of standard A4 paper (4.1 mentions 8 ½ x 11 inch paper, standard in North America).

  • Double space throughout—text, quotations, notes, Works Cited—everything.

  • Choose Times New Roman or Arial font—12 point to aid easy reading.

  • Use one-inch (2.54cm) margins and set up a header with page numbersin the upper right-hand corner and your ID number in the left-hand corner

  • Your first page of the essay should include the titleof your module and the name of your module tutorand then the datewith a title centred as shown in the example below:


 

Compare this to the instruction at 4.3 in the MLA Handbook: the difference is the anonymity of the Warwick system vs the use of your name in the MLA system.

Making reference to works of others in your text:
In MLA style, referring to the works of others in your text is done in two ways. When you make reference to someone else's idea, either through paraphrasing or quoting them directly, you:

1. Provide the author's name and the page number of the work in a parenthetical citation

2. Provide full citation information for the work in your Works Cited list.

This allows people to know which sources you used in writing your essay and then be able to look them up themselves, so that they can use them in their scholarly work. Works Citedmeans just that: those works you have cited in your text; Bibliographyis a more inclusive term which means all the books you consulted in researching and writing your paper—it may include some sources you do not cite. Most often, Bibliographies accompany dissertations or longer works while Works Cited is the preferred format for essays. You can ask your tutor to be sure for any given assignment.

Quotations may be embedded within your work but if they extend to more than four lines, they should be set off from the text by beginning a new line, indenting one inch(2.54cm) from the left margin, and typing it double-spaced, without adding quotation marks. In such cases, a colon usually introduces the quotation. See 3.7.2

Here are some basic guidelines for referring to the works of others in your text.

Parenthetical Citations:

MLA format follows the author-page method of citation. This means that the author's last name and the page number(s) from which the quotation is taken must appear in the text, and a complete reference should appear in your Works Cited list—rather than preparing separate endnotes or footnotes for each reference. This will save you time once you get the knack of it. The author's name may appear either in the sentence itself or in parentheses following the quotation or paraphrase, but the page number(s) should always appear in the parentheses, not in the text of your sentence.

For example:

1. Wordsworth stated that Romantic poetry was marked by a ‘spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings’ (263).

2. Romantic poetry is characterized by the ‘ spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings’ (Wordsworth 263).

3. Wordsworth extensively explored the role of emotion in the creative process (263).

All three of these versions are correct (see Chapter Six and in particular 6.3 and 6.4).

If the work you are making reference to has no author, use an abbreviated version of the work's title. For non-print sources, such as films, TV series, pictures, or other media, or electronic sources, include the name that begins the entry in the Works Cited page.

(See 6.4.4)

Sometimes you may have to use an indirect quotation. An indirect quotation is a quotation that you found in another source that was quoting from the original. For such indirect quotations, use ‘qtd. in’ to indicate the source. Use of this indirection should be kept to a minimum—you should obtain and cite from the original whenever possible.

For example:

The aim, says von Wely, is to ‘create ambiguous, hermetic images which you can hang meaning on’ (qtd. in Mason 84).

For further ideas about how to set up and use parenthetical citations smoothly, see the suggestions for readability at 6.3.

Quoting from Plays or other Dialogue-based Texts:
MLA specifies how you should quote dialogue from two or more characters and also shows you how to use page numbers for modern texts and Act/Scene/Line references for Shakespeare. See 3.7.4. The format in both cases is to set off the text by indenting, and also to write the character name in capital letters.

For example:

 

Preparing the Works Cited List
: The works cited list should appear at the end of your essay. It provides the information necessary for a reader to locate and be able to read any sources you cite in the essay. Each source you cite in the body must appear in your works-cited list; likewise, each entry in the works-cited list must be cited in your text. Preparing your works cited list using MLA style is covered in detail in Chapter Five of the Handbook. Here are some guidelines for preparing works cited for theatre and performance work.

  • Titles of full-length plays, books, and journals are written in Italics.So, too, are film titles, operas, or television shows, and major titled works of visual art. However, one-act plays are done in quotation marks, as are short stories and episodes of television shows. See 5.7 for specific guidance on most of these.

  • Besides books, you will be citing scholarly journals, magazines, and newspapers frequently. They are each a separate category and must be treated differently. Once you are clear about how to cite them, it is quite simple. Journals usually come out three or four times a year while magazines may be weekly publications. Some journals divide their issues into volumes and may or may not assign each a number. Magazines and newspapers usually are cited by their date of issue; newspapers sometimes also need additional information such as section. All of these need page references. However, when you cite from web sources, the methods of citation change slightly. See examples below, and consult 5.4 for details on each of these types of publication. See 5.6 for citing web publications or materials accessed online.

  • There is a principle guiding the citations—you want to give credit to those who deserve it and specific location information for anyone trying to find the source. This explains, for example, why you must give both a translator’s name and an author’s name in translated work; it explains why you must cite not only an author of an essay but when it is part of a collection, the editor(s) of the full volume and publication information. A frequent oversight of students is to miss this crediting—especially with a translation.

  • Note that each piece of documentation is labelled ‘ Print’ or ‘Web’ and that for all web-based citations, you must also include the URL and your access date. (Note: This is one of the differences from the MLA style—we ask for the URLs while MLA does not)

Most Common Types of Citation and MLA Handbook location for help:
You will find there are certain kinds of citations you use a lot, and others only occasionally. Theatre and performance scholars cite reviews and interviews, theatre websites, and scripts very often in addition to books, journal articles, and magazines. Many sources come from newspaper articles; many newspapers are now accessed primarily on line. Below you will find a list of the most common types of citations you will need, with the reference to the MLA Handbookin bold face, and this will be followed by examples of these types of citations. Last, you will find a Works Cited list made up from these works.

Commonly Needed Forms:

  • Books with one author 5.5.2

  • Books with two or more authors 5.54

  • Books in translation 5.5.11

  • A Work in an Anthology 5.5.6

  • A Book Published in second or subsequent editions 5.5.13

  • Article in a scholarly journal 5.4.2

  • Article in a journal with only issue numbers 5.4.3

  • Newspaper articles (print) 5.4.5

  • Magazine articles 5.4.5

  • Web-based documentation (general rules) 5.6.1

  • Article published only on the web 5.6.2 and 5.6.3

  • Journal article or other work from data bases 5.6.4

  • Video clip from the web (e.g., U-tube) 5.6.2.d

  • Performance 5.7.4

  • Film or Video Recording 5.7.3

Sample of These Citations

Book with one author:

Jackson, Shannon. Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics. New York: Routledge, 2011. Print.

Book with two or more authors:

Sanders, Marlene and Marcia Rock. Waiting for Prime Time: The Women of Television News. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1994. Print.

Book in Translation:

Lehmann, Hans-Thies. Postdramatic Theatre.Trans. Karen Jűrs-Munby. London: Routledge, 2006. Print.

Work in an Anthology:

Varney, Denise. ‘Perfect Unhappiness: Globalization in the Suburbs’.The Local Meets the Global in Performance. Ed. Pirkko Koski and Melissa Sihra. Newcastle upon

Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2010. Print.

Book published in Second Edition:

Carlson, Marvin. Performance: A Critical Introduction. 2nded.New York: Routledge, 2004. Print.

Article in a Scholarly Journal:

Rae, Paul. ‘Freedom of Repression’. Theatre Research International 36.2 (2011): 117-33. Print.

Article in Journal with only Issue Numbers:

Kirkwood, Carla. ‘Chinese Performance Artists: Redrawing the Map of Chinese Culture’ TheatreForum 25 (2004): 16-26. Print.

Newpaper Article:

Nightingale, Benedict. ‘Useful Lessons in fair play’. The Times 6 January 1955: 31. Print.

Magazine Article:

Firestone, Lonnie. ‘Not Just About Nightingales’. American Theater Sept. 2011: 10-15. Print.

Journal Article accessed from data base:

Dean, Jodi. ‘Cybersalons and Civil Society: Rethinking the Public Sphere in Transnational Technoculture’. Public Culture13.2 (2001): 243–2 65. Project Muse. Web. http://0use.jhu.edu.pugwash.lib.warwick.ac.uk/journals/public_culture/v013/13.2dean.pdf 30 June 2011.

Clip from the Web (YouTube):

Let Me Down Easy. Written and performed by Anna Deavere Smith. Dir. Leonard Foglia. 2010.YouTube.com. Web. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0SegzYAyy0 30 September 2011.

UPDATE

MLA and Electronic sources

From https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/08/

MLA lists electronic sources as Web Publications. Thus, when including the medium of publication for electronic sources, list the medium as Web.

It is always a good idea to maintain personal copies of electronic information, when possible. It is good practice to print or save Web pages or, better, using a program like Adobe Acrobat, to keep your own copies for future reference. Most Web browsers will include URL/electronic address information when you print, which makes later reference easy. Also, you might use the Bookmark function in your Web browser in order to return to documents more easily.

Important Note on the Use of URLs in MLA

MLA no longer requires the use of URLs in MLA citations. Because Web addresses are not static (i.e., they change often) and because documents sometimes appear in multiple places on the Web (e.g., on multiple databases), MLA explains that most readers can find electronic sources via title or author searches in Internet Search Engines.

For instructors or editors who still wish to require the use of URLs, MLA suggests that the URL appear in angle brackets after the date of access. Break URLs only after slashes.

Aristotle. Poetics. Trans. S. H. Butcher. The Internet Classics Archive. Web Atomic and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 13 Sept. 2007. Web. 4 Nov. 2008. ‹http://classics.mit.edu/›.

Abbreviations Commonly Used with Electronic Sources

If publishing information is unavailable for entries that require publication information such as publisher (or sponsor) names and publishing dates, MLA requires the use of special abbreviations to indicate that this information is not available. Use n.p. to indicate that neither a publisher nor a sponsor name has been provided. Use n.d. when the Web page does not provide a publication date.

When an entry requires that you provide a page but no pages are provided in the source (as in the case of an online-only scholarly journal or a work that appears in an online-only anthology), use the abbreviation n. pag.

Basic Style for Citations of Electronic Sources (Including Online Databases)

Here are some common features you should try and find before citing electronic sources in MLA style. Not every Web page will provide all of the following information. However, collect as much of the following information as possible both for your citations and for your research notes:

• Author and/or editor names (if available)

• Article name in quotation marks (if applicable)

• Title of the Website, project, or book in italics. (Remember that some Print publications have Web publications with slightly different names. They may, for example, include the additional information or otherwise modified information, like domain names [e.g. .com or .net].)

• Any version numbers available, including revisions, posting dates, volumes, or issue numbers.

• Publisher information, including the publisher name and publishing date.

• Take note of any page numbers (if available).

• Medium of publication.

• Date you accessed the material.

• URL (if required, or for your own personal reference; MLA does not require a URL).


Works Cited

Below is a screengrab of a page showing Works Cited drawn from some of the above references. Things to note:

  • Items are not numbered but alphabetised by the first word in each entry (usually the author's last name).

  • Works Cited begins on a separate page and also includes your ID and page number in the header

  • The title Works Cited is at the top of the page in bold and centered

  • The first line of each entry in your list is flush left with the margin. Subsequent lines in each entry should be indented 1/2 inch (1.27cm) - this is known as a hanging indent.



EndNote Web
 - EndNote Web is a piece of software which will help you to:

Store and organise the references you will collect during your research

Automatically format citations, reference lists and bibliographies in your documents

Full information on how to setup an account and how to use the service to gather, arrange and export sources can be found on the following library page:

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/library/research/endnote
< /span>

Conclusion - Crucial points

What is crucial is that you present your argument – and document it – in a way that will give readers confidence. [If you cannot do this work accurately, then it is unlikely that your readers will have confidence in the accuracy of your arguments and the clarity of your thinking/analysis.] The above information is intended as a selective guide to the appropriate presentation for assessed work. It is not fully comprehensive – but it does highlight some errors that have, over many years, undermined the credibility and accuracy of students’ assessed work. If you would not find it easy to read and fully understand your own work, then you need to look again at these basic guidelines – and at the fully articulated guidelines in the MLA Handbook. Once you have mastered the basic rules of style and referencing you will find that the presentation of your assessed work does justice to the individuality and subtlety of your arguments.

Check your spelling.

Do not change tense mid-sentence.

Above all: say what you want to say as clearly and concisely as possible.

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TUTORS/MENTORS

The Tutorial System

Departmental Senior Tutor: Jim Davis

The Personal Tutor system at the University of Warwick is a vital and central part of campus life. Personal Tutors, working in conjunction with the wide range of services available to students, are expected to provide such support, advice and guidance to students as may be necessary or appropriate to enable them to gain the most from their studies at the University.

The primary aims are to make it easier for personal tutors to carry out their role, and for tutees to know what they can, and cannot, reasonably expect from their personal tutors, it being a key premise of these guidelines that the system can only work effectively if both staff and students are fully aware of, and carry out their responsibilities as follows:

The role of the Personal Tutor is primarily:

  • To assist students with the process of induction and orientation into University life and to retain an interest in their personal and academic development throughout their academic careers;

  • To provide academic advice to personal tutees on their progress and development;

  • To give students help and advice about pastoral/non-academic matters insofar as s/he is competent to do so;

  • To signpost and refer students on to professional University support services for further assistance if necessary;

  • To seek to ensure that no student withdraws from the University prematurely for want of support and guidance;

  • To signpost students to relevant careers / skills provision.

The role of the Personal Tutee is:

  • To be responsible for their own academic development and achievement by contributing positively to a productive working relationship with the personal tutor;

  • To respond promptly to an invitation to attend a personal tutorial meeting;

  • To be an active engaged member of their departmental academic community.

The role of the Department Senior Tutor is:

  • To be responsible for the effective operation of the personal tutor system in their department, including making sure that students know who is their personal tutor;

  • To provide support and guidance to students if the personal tutor is unavailable;

  • To provide support and guidance to members of academic staff who are personal tutors;

The role of the University Senior Tutor is:

  • To promote the academic welfare of students, collectively and individually;

  • To be responsible for the effective operation of the personal tutor system across the university;

  • To provide a sympathetic person to whom students can turn to in confidence for support regarding difficulties with their studies, if no other source of support has been able to help;

  • To provide help and advice to academic members of staff who are Personal Tutors.

The University Senior Tutor is normally consulted only when all other sources of help and support have been exhausted.

For more information on the Personal Tutor System please see

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/tutors/personaltutors/

Frequency of Meetings
Generally, Tutors will meet with their tutees every other week in their first term at Warwick, ususally meeting with students as a tutor group and then at least once per term for the second and third terms, usually on an individual basis. In the second and third year, tutees should meet with their tutors at least once per term, signing up for a tutorial using the sign-up sheets posted on the tutor's door or by prior email arrangement.

Feedback from Tutors
Your personal tutor will offer academic guidance throughout your studies and as part of that process will have access to and discuss with you the feedback you receive from module tutors. If, for any reason, you do not want to discuss your academic progress with your personal tutor or would like to request a change of tutors please email our Senior Tutor, Jim Davis

List of Personal Tutors 2014/5

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/theatre_s/current/ug/personal_tutors/

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MENTOR SCHEME

The scheme is run by students for students. Your peer mentor will be able to give you a student perspective on a whole range of topics, and has the advantage of having already experienced what you are experiencing as a new Warwick student

Guidelines for mentees (First years)

Mentoring occurs through a series of conversations in which one person (Mentor) draws on their experience, expertise and knowledge to advise and guide a less experienced person (Mentee) in order to enhance their performance or support their development.

The coming few weeks and months will provide an exciting and new experience as you embark on your studies, but will also provide some challenges in learning and understanding. By being part of the Theatre Studies Mentoring Scheme you can meet with your mentor to help you get used to your studies and settle into the new environment.

Your mentor’s role is to:

  • - Share their experiences, thoughts and ideas,

  • - Listen, sympathise and ask questions,

  • - Encourage action when something has been identified as important to you,

  • - Advise and guide within area of expertise, not offer solutions,

  • - Not know all the answers – but know when to redirect mentees to the right place within the University or ask for help from the Student or Staff Co-ordinator

  • - To look out for their mentee’s general well being,

  • - Discuss and agree the Mentoring Agreement with the mentee, with both retaining an individual copy.

Your role is to:

  • - Consider and share what you are looking for and seek the mentor’s advice,

  • - Take an active role in considering how the mentoring relationship is going to work,

  • - Assess the progress of the relationship – be open and honest if the mentoring relationship is working, do priorities need to be reset,

  • - Follow up on action points agreed and do the necessary preparation for the next meeting,

  • - Listen to the mentor, be able to receive feedback and consider options from the mentor’s perspective,

  • - Be considerate of your mentor’s time,

  • - Discuss and agree the Mentoring Agreement with your mentor, with both retaining an individual copy.

Mentors will provide you with a variety of support:

  • - Discussion of what modules contain and module choices for later years

  • - Information regarding the format of lectures and seminars, lecturers’ styles and how to get the most from them

  • - Advice regarding submitting and receiving assessed work, using the library and reading lists effectively

  • - Social opportunities at Warwick, including sports and societies, Warwick Volunteers, etc;

  • - Provide general advice on the local area including; registering with healthcare professionals, transport links, etc;

  • - Referral information for issues that are beyond the scope of a mentor such as; academic coaching, Directors of Undergraduate Studies, Personal Tutor, Student Support Services.

It is important to remember a few things about the mentoring scheme:

  • - Your mentor is not taking the role of your personal tutor, senior tutor or a counselor. If topics come up that they are not comfortable talking to you about – or are not qualified to deal with they will tell you. Your mentors are there to offer friendly advice and guidance within areas of their expertise and they can signpost you to the Student Support Services, Senior Tutor or Theatre Studies department at Warwick. If any concerns arise affecting the mentoring relationship the mentor may seek the appropriate support from the Student Co-ordinator, Amy.Thompson@warwick.ac.ukor the Staff Co-ordinator t.white@warwick.ac.ukBoth are also able to support with any scheme specific queries e.g. changes to mentoring relationship, supporting documentation, etc.

  • - The relationship between the mentor and mentee is designed to lead to independence rather than dependence and should be a positive experience for all involved, so it is important to be mindful of your behavior and to treat this relationship as a professional one, albeit informal and friendly.

  • - As you progress during the mentoring relationship you feel more comfortable you may need progressively less advice. However, mentors are encouraged to keep the channels of communication open – in case they are needed.

  • - Please remember your mentor is a volunteer and will probably have plenty of things going on with their research and life which requires their time and commitment. It is important to stick to the agreement you have made regarding when and how you will make contact with your mentor.

  • - You might want to talk about research methodologies and good research practice. However, mentors are not expected to provide detailed subject specific advice. For example:

o Give detailed comments on drafts of written work,

o Provide advice on departmental policies

o Provide detailed advice on academic issues such as referencing practice

o Act on behalf of the mentee, for example raising an issue of concern to the mentee with someone else.

Part of your mentor’s role is to share ideas, it is your responsibility to find out this information.

As part of your role you should familiarise yourself with:

  • Code of Ethics of the Scheme

  • Initial Meeting guidelines

  • Mentoring Agreement

There are various options to support both mentors and mentees in terms of learning from the experience or exploring any difficulties encountered.

  • - Student Support Services for support and welfare structure

  • - Senior Tutor for support on academic and personal advice

  • - Theatre Studies department for information and advice relating to your study

  • - Student Co-ordinator or Staff Co-ordinator to support mentors by helping them to think through how to respond if a problem has arisen affecting the mentoring relationship - for instance, difficulty in focusing the conversation, concerns about the mentee’s behaviour, the possible need to seek appropriate professional support for the mentee, Amy.Thompson@warwick.ac.uk/ t.white@warwick.ac.uk

  • - Student Co-ordinator or Staff Co-ordinator to support mentors and mentees with scheme specific queries e.g. copies of documentation, changes to mentoring relationship, feedback

MENTORS

Ella Hawkins (Programme Co-ordinator)

Beth Fiducia-Brookes

Kimberley Fennell

Samuel George

Elysha Cookson

Jamie Wright

Emma Devine

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SSLC

The minutes and list of elected students comprising the SSLC can be found at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/sunion/sslc/arts/theatre/

From the SSLC Handbook –

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/sunion/sslc/handbook/ 

SSLCs are committees made up of student representatives and members of academic staff.

They provide an accessible arena for students to discuss with staff issues connected to teaching, learning and student support. They also provide an opportunity for the department to receive feedback from students, particularly if changes to a course are proposed.

The SSLC should ALWAYS be consulted of any major changes to course structures or content.

SSLCs SHOULD NOT consider matters relating to named members of staff or students, nor are they the place for students to air their personal grievances.

Key principles of the SSLC system

SSLCs can be organised in many different ways to suit the needs of the students they represent. The guidance in this handbook sets out a framework that should be suitable for the majority of SSLCs. Advice on arrangements for students on courses that do not follow the typical, full- time campus- based pattern is included below.

All SSLCS, however they are organised should be guided by the following principles. SSLCs should:

Be student- led. SSLC reps should be proactive in organising the SSLC and, in consultation with the students they represent, in raising issues for discussion. The SSLC should have a student Chair and Secretary. All SSLC reps should take part in available training to help them fulfil their role

Be supported by a named Academic Convenor, who is a member of staff appointed by the Head of Department. Convenors should attend available briefing sessions to gather information and share good practice

Provide an accessible forum to enable students to discuss teaching, learning and student support issues with staff in an open manner, within the framework of a formal structure. The department should consult with the SSLC on new proposals, including changes to courses

For full- time, campus- based courses, meet at least four times per year, and for part- time campus-based courses, meet at least twice per year. Liaison mechanisms that do not involve face- to- face meetings (eg for some distance learning courses) should provide students with a least a similar frequency of structured opportunities to raise and discuss issues with staff

Encourage the resolution of issues and improvements at a departmental and/or course level. Issues raised through the SSLC should be discussed regularly and promptly at staff meetings. An SSLC rep should be encouraged to attend departmental staff meetings: See SSLC Meetings

Ensure that discussions and resulting actions are documented and disseminated to the student body represented through the SSLC. This is key to the credibility and success of the SSLC

Produce an annual summary of issues discussed and actions taken, to feed into University and Students' Union decision- making process and encourage action at an institutional level

Not consider matters relating to named members of staff or students, or personal concerns or grievances. Advice on how to raise individual issues is included at the end of the SSLC handbook –

  1. http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/sunion/sslc/handbook/

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Joint degrees

The department participates in the following Joint Degrees

French with Theatre Studies (Full-Time)

English and Theatre Studies (Full-Time)

Italian with Theatre Studies (Full-Time)

German and Theatre Studies (Full-Time)

Hispanic Studies and Theatre Studies (Full-Time)

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Study Abroad

We have agreements with a number of universities in Europe, Australia and the US. Please contact Dr Milija Gluhovic to discuss the possibility of studying for one or more terms abroad.

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University Regulations

Reg 10. Examination Regulations

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/examregs/

10.1 Regulations for Examiners

Setting and Proof-Reading of Examination Papers and other Assessments

(1)

(a) The Head of Department shall be responsible for the provision of examination papers and other assessments for modules taught by his/her department.

(b) For each module a named member of the academic staff must be responsible to the Head of Department for setting examination papers and dealing with corrections to them. This member of staff should ensure that all final proof copies of the papers in his/her subject are properly checked before they are returned to the Academic Registrar for printing.

Procedure on Day of Examination

(2) The examiner responsible for the papers shall be present in the examination room for ten minutes before the examination is due to begin. He/she shall leave the room immediately after the Senior Invigilator has made the required announcements at the start of the examination and shall remain available outside the examination room for a further ten minutes.

(3) Before the examination begins the examiner shall check his/her paper for any errors. If there are any amendments to be made he/she shall inform the Senior Invigilator who will make the necessary announcements.

(4) Before leaving the examination room an examiner shall inform an invigilator where he/she may be contacted in the University in the event of any questions from a candidate on his/her paper.

After the Examination

(5) Scripts are taken from the examination room to the Academic Office for final checking and packaging. Examiners will be informed by the Academic Office of the details of the distribution of scripts.

(6) An examiner who, when marking examination scripts, suspects that cheating has taken place shall consult the Head of his/her Department, who shall, if it is thought necessary, make a full report to the Academic Registrar. The procedure thereafter shall be governed by Regulations 11(A)(2)-(7) of the Regulations Governing the Procedure to be Adopted in the Event of Suspected Cheating in a University Test.

(7) An examiner who suspects that a candidate has offered false evidence of his/her progress in a University test not conducted under examination conditions as laid down by the University Regulations for the Invigilation of Examinations shall consult the Head of his/her Department, who shall, if it is thought necessary, make a full report to the Registrar. The procedure thereafter shall be governed by Regulations 11(B)(3)-(8) of the Regulations Governing the Procedure to be Adopted in the Event of Suspected Cheating in a University Test.

Retention of Scripts

(8) Undergraduate Material

(a) Scripts written in invigilated examinations which are held by the University and which contribute to final degree credit, and all assessed work which contributes to final degree credit shall be retained until 30 December following the meeting of the final year Board of Examiners in the case of successful candidates, and until 30 December in the following year for all others.

(b) The following are excluded from the provisions of paragraph (a) above:

(i) artefacts completed by students of Arts and Crafts on the BA (with Qualified Teacher Status) degree course and reports on individual pieces of laboratory practical work, provided that in either case the piece of work concerned contributes 5 per cent or less of the credit for that year of the course;and

(ii) first year examination answers or assessed essays which individually contribute less than 1 per cent of the final degree result.

(c) Scripts and assessed work not contributing to final degree credit or else falling within (b)(ii) above shall be retained until 30 September following the Summer term meeting of the first year Board of Examiners in the case of successful candidates, or until 31 December following the September meeting of the first year Board of Examiners in the case of candidates allowed to proceed to the second year after the September examinations, and until 30 September in the following year for all others.

(9) Postgraduate Material

Scripts and assessed work of postgraduate courses shall be retained until six months after the date of the invigilated examinations.

Notes:

In addition to the provisions concerning retention of scripts set out in paragraphs (8) and (9) above, the Senate has passed the following resolutions:

(1) That work contributing to final degree credit, including essays, dissertations, reports and laboratory notebooks, other than scripts completed in invigilated examinations, may, at the discretion of the appropriate Department, be returned to candidates before the meeting of the Board of Examiners which will consider the marks awarded for that work, subject to the following conditions:

(a) That any mark awarded prior to the examiners’ meeting is subject to revision; that this will be made clear to the candidate concerned before disclosing any such marks.

(b) That material which is returned will be re-submitted by the candidate in order that it is available at the examiners’ meeting.

(2) That Heads of Departments, when considering whether to return work to students, should bear in mind the possibility of such works being altered before re-submission, and should consider the procedures they should adopt if a student fails to re-submit.

(3) That the decisions under resolution (1) should not apply to reports on individual pieces of laboratory practical work or to artefacts completed by students of Art and Crafts on the BA (with Qualified Teacher Status) degree course, provided that the piece of work concerned contributes 5 per cent or less of the credit for that year of the course. Examiners may, however, require those items to be re-submitted by the student as in (1) above.

10.2 General Examination Regulations

(1) No candidate is permitted to leave the examination room until half an hour after the start of the examination, and normally no candidate is permitted to enter the examination room more than half an hour after the start of the examination. However, if a candidate arrives after the first half hour has passed, the invigilator may use his/her discretion in extending the time limit provided no candidate has already left the room. If a candidate is excluded from the examination room under this Regulation he/she should in his/her own interest report to the staff at the Student Enquiry Desk of the Academic Office.

(2) Any irregularities of conduct within the examination room will be reported and the invigilator may order a candidate to leave the examination room.

(3) Except when prevented by medical reasons or other sufficient cause, a candidate who fails to present himself/herself for examination will be deemed to have failed in that part of the examination. Misreading of the examination timetable will not be regarded as ‘sufficient cause’. If, for any reason, a candidate is unable to attend an examination, he/she should report the circumstances to the Academic Registrar at the earliest possible moment. The Chair of the Board of Examiners shall also be notified by the Academic Registrar of any such absences.

(4) Candidates are forbidden to take into the examination room any books, papers, calculators, or any information storage and retrieval device, or any attache case or bag in which such items can be carried, unless there is an express provision otherwise in the case of a particular paper. Candidates are forbidden to pass calculators or any other item to one another during examinations.

(5) If a candidate suspects that there is a printing error in a question paper he/she should consult an invigilator.

(6) No student may leave the examination room during the last fifteen minutes of the examination, in order to avoid disturbing other candidates who are completing their papers.

(7) Smoking is not allowed in examination rooms.

(8) Candidates are forbidden to take into the examination room any devices which may emit noise or are likely to disturb other candidates

10.3 Regulations for the Invigilation of Examinations

(1) It is the prime duty of invigilators to ensure that no improper practices occur within the examination room and that the examinations are conducted within the terms of the regulations agreed by the Senate.

(2) Not less than two invigilators will be allocated to each examination room. Invigilators must remain in the examination room throughout the examination except when their duties require them to leave.

(3) One invigilator in each room shall be designated Senior Invigilator. The Senior Invigilator shall be responsible for the co-ordination of the invigilation in that room and such duties as may be set out in the Instructions to Invigilators.

(4) Invigilators under the direction of the Senior Invigilator shall be responsible for the security and laying out of the examination papers and for such other duties specified in the Instructions to Invigilators.

(5) At the time scheduled for the start of the examination the Senior Invigilator shall:

(a) make an announcement to the effect that candidates must satisfy themselves that they are in possession of the correct paper;

(b) ask candidates to study carefully the rubric at the head of the examination paper;

(c) make all other necessary announcements.

(6) Normally no candidate may be admitted after the examination has been in progress for half an hour; if, however, no candidate has left the room, the invigilators may use their discretion in extending this time limit. If a candidate is refused admission under this Regulation, the invigilator must tell the candidate in his/her own interest to report immediately to staff at the Student Enquiry Desk of the Academic Office.

(7) Where an invigilator suspects a candidate of cheating the invigilator shall, after informing and consulting the other invigilator(s), warn the candidate that a report will be made. The candidate shall then be permitted to finish the paper. A full report of the circumstances shall be made to the Academic Registrar immediately after the examination.

(8) Candidates are forbidden to pass calculators or any other item to one another during examinations.

(9) Invigilators may require a candidate to leave the examination room, but only if his/her conduct is disturbing other candidates.

(10) Candidates leaving the examination room temporarily for any reason must be accompanied by an invigilator.

(11) Instructions to Invigilators shall be published annually by the Academic Office, setting out details of the procedures to be followed in the conduct of examinations.

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Reg. 11 Procedure to be adopted in the event of Suspected cheating in a University test

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/cheating/

Definitions:

In these Regulations ‘cheating’ means an attempt to benefit oneself or another, by deceit or fraud. This shall include reproducing one's own work or the work of another person or persons without proper acknowledgement.

Faculty Board and Departmental Instructions

Each Faculty Board or Department, School, or Graduate School may issue instructions containing more specific definitions to apply in that Faculty or Department, School or Graduate School in the assessment of work not undertaken under invigilated examination conditions.

In these Regulations the words ‘department’ or ‘departmental’ include as appropriate Schools, or Graduate Schools of the University.

(A) Tests Conducted under Examination Conditions as Laid Down in the University Regulations for the Invigilation of Examinations

(1) Regulation 10.3 (7) of the Regulations for the Invigilation of Examinations states that ‘Where an invigilator suspects a candidate of cheating the invigilator shall, after informing and consulting with the other invigilator(s), warn the candidate that a report will be made. The candidate shall then be permitted to finish the paper. A full report of the circumstances shall be made to the Academic Registrar immediately after the examination.’ Accordingly, the student shall be warned that a report will be made to the Academic Registrar, and shall be informed that he/she may make a written statement, to be submitted to the Academic Registrar, before the meeting of an Investigating Committee. The student shall be provided by the Academic Registrar with a statement of the allegations made against him/her, together with copies of any supporting evidence, at least five days before the meeting of the Investigating Committee.

(2) The invigilator’s report and the student’s statement, if any, shall be considered by an Investigating Committee of the Senate, whose membership shall be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor (or his nominee) and shall be chaired by the Chair of a Faculty Board or the Chair of a Faculty Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Committee (as appropriate) other than that of the student's faculty (or his/her nominee), together with not fewer than two members drawn from a panel of up to twenty members appointed by the Senate on the recommendation of the Faculty Boards (up to five nominees per faculty, panel members to serve for a period of three years). The Investigating Committee shall not include any member of the student's department. The Head(s) of the Department(s) responsible for the module(s) concerned (or his/her authorised deputy) shall present the case and shall have a right to call the invigilators and/or other witnesses to appear before the Committee. The Chair of the appropriate Examiners' Board (or his/her authorised deputy where the Chair of the Examiners' Board is also the Head of the Department responsible for the module(s) concerned) shall be in attendance in an advisory capacity.

(3) If he/she wishes, the student shall have the right to appear before the Investigating Committee, and he/she may invite any one other person to attend the Committee. The name and status of any person accompanying the student must be notified to the Chair of the Investigating Committee via the Academic Registrar in advance of the meeting. The student shall also have the right to request witnesses to appear before the Committee and/or to provide the Committee with a written statement prior to its meeting.

(4) If the Investigating Committee is not satisfied that the candidate has cheated, he/she shall be informed and the matter shall end there. The Chair of the Investigating Committee may also take Chair's action to dismiss a case prior to any committee meeting if s/he judges that there is no case to answer.

(5) If the Investigating Committee is satisfied that cheating has taken place it shall determine the penalty and inform the appropriate Board of Examiners and the student accordingly. The maximum penalty shall not normally exceed a mark of zero in that examination paper, (if appropriate, with or without the opportunity to resit the paper), but in appropriate cases the Committee shall have the power to impose a more severe penalty, it being understood that such a penalty would be imposed without prejudice to the provisions of the Disciplinary Regulations. The Investigating Committee may refer cases it considers appropriate to the University Discipline Committee, the sanctions available to the Discipline Committee including termination of the student's registration.

(6) (a) The student shall have the right of appeal against either the decision of the Investigating Committee or the penalty, to an appeal committee appointed by the Vice-Chancellor (or his nominee), consisting of a Pro-Vice-Chancellor (as Chair) together with not fewer than two of the Chairs of the Faculty Boards or two of the Chairs of the Faculty Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Committees, as appropriate (or their nominees). No member of the relevant Investigating Committee shall also be a member of the appeal committee. Any appeal must be submitted in writing to the Academic Registrar within ten days of the notification of the Investigating Committee’s decision to the student.

(b) The appeal committee will consider appeals from students made on the following grounds:

(i) that there was a material irregularity or failure in procedure in the conduct of the original hearing before the Investigating Committee;

(ii) that relevant evidence has come to light which the appellant was unable to present to the Investigating Committee at the original hearing;

(iii) that in light of new evidence the penalty imposed by the Investigating Committee is excessive in relation to the offence committed.

(c) Appeals shall be considered initially by the Chair of the appeal committee in consultation with one other member of the committee to establish that a prima facie case for appeal exists. Appeals shall not be considered where, in the opinion of the Chair and the consulted member of the appeal committee, the appellant has failed to bring the appeal within any of the grounds listed under (b)(i) - (iii) above.

(d) If he/she wishes, the appellant shall have the right to appear before the appeal committee, and he/she may invite any one other person to attend the Committee. The name and status of any person accompanying the student must be notified to the Chair of the committee via the Academic Registrar in advance of the meeting.

(e) The Head(s) of the Department(s) responsible for the module(s) concerned (or his/her authorised deputy) shall be at the committee and shall be invited to present a response to the appeal.

(f) If required, the Chair of the Investigating Committee shall be asked to attend the appeal committee to answer any questions concerning the Investigating Committee’s original decision, but shall attend for this purpose only and shall not remain present throughout the appeal hearing.

(g) The appeal committee shall have power to confirm or to set aside the decision of the Investigating Committee, or to set aside or vary the penalty imposed by the Investigating Committee. The decisions of the appeal committee shall be final and shall be communicated to the secretary of the appropriate Board of Examiners.

(7) An examiner who when marking examination scripts suspects that cheating has taken place shall consult the Head of his/her Department. If the Head of Department considers that cheating has occurred according to the definitions set out in University Regulations and/or his/her Faculty’s instructions, he/she shall make a full report to the Academic Registrar and shall warn the student that this report has been made. He/she shall also inform the student that he/she may make a written statement to be submitted to the Academic Registrar before the meeting of the Investigating Committee. The procedure thereafter shall be governed by paragraphs (A)(2)-(6) above.


(B) Essays, Dissertations, Reports and Other Assessed Work, not Undertaken under Examination Conditions as Laid Down in the University Regulations for the Invigilation of Examinations

(1) Where there is suspicion that a candidate or former candidate has reproduced in a University assessment his/her own work which has previously been submitted for assessment or work of another person or persons without proper acknowledgement, the Head(s) of the Department (or the Head's authorised deputy) responsible for the module(s) concerned shall be consulted. This procedure shall also apply to work formally submitted by candidates for a research degree as part of the annual review or upgrade process.

(2) If the Head of the Department (or his/her authorised deputy) considers that an offence may have occurred according to the definition set out in the University Regulations or Faculty or departmental instructions, he/she shall (other than in the circumstances set out in paragraphs (3) and (4) below)either:

(a) Make a full report to the Academic Registrar, thereby invoking the procedures set out in paragraphs (5)-(9) below; or

(b) Exercise his/her discretion to pursue the matter without reference to an Investigating Committee, in which case he/she shall inform the student of the allegation and provide the student with reasonable opportunity to make representations on his/her own behalf, before determining whether an offence has occurred and, if so, determining the appropriate penalty, which shall not exceed a mark of zero in the piece of work to which the offence relates (with or without the opportunity to resubmit or undertake a further assessment). The student, having been informed of the penalty, may choose either:

(i) to accept the penalty as a final decision in which case a report of the circumstances of the case and level of penalty exacted shall be lodged by the Head (or his/her authorised deputy) with the Secretary of the appropriate Board of Examiners; or

(ii) request, witin ten days of being informed by the Head of Department of the penalty, that the matter is considered by an Investigating Committee, thereby invoking procedures (5)-(9) below, whereupon the Head (or his/her authorised deputy) shall make a report to the Academic Registrar. In exceptional circumstances the Head of Department may consider a request submitted after ten days.

(3) In the event that the examiners for a higher degree by research suspect a candidate of cheating, the examination process shall be stopped. The internal examiner or examination advisor shall inform the Head of Department of the allegation. The Head of Department shall make a full report to the Academic Registrar, thus invoking the procedures set out in paragraphs (5)-(9) below.

(4) Where the alleged offence relates to an assessment which contributed to the previous approval of an academic award or honour to the candidate, the Head of Department (or his/her authorised deputy) shall make a full report to the Academic Registrar, thus invoking the procedure set out in paragraphs (5)-(9) below.

(5) In all cases where a report has been submitted by the Head of Department (or his/her authorised deputy) to the Academic Registrar, the Head (or his/her authorised deputy) shall warn the student that this report has been made, and inform him/her that he/she may make a written statement to be submitted to the Academic Registrar before the meeting of an Investigating Committee. The student shall be provided by the Academic Registrar with a statement of the allegations made against him/her, together with copies of any supporting evidence, at least five days before the meeting of the Investigating Committee.

(6) The reports shall be considered by an Investigating Committee of the Senate, whose membership shall be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor (or his nominee) and shall be chaired by the Chair of a Faculty Board or the Chair of a Faculty Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Committee (as appropriate) other than that of the student's faculty (or his/her nominee), together with not fewer than two members drawn from a panel of up to twenty members appointed by the Senate on the recommendation of the Faculty Boards (up to five nominees per faculty, panel members to serve for a period of three years). The Investigating Committee shall not include any member of the student's department. In considering the case the Investigating Committee shall take into account the Faculty and/or departmental instructions in relation to assessed work as well as the definitions in relation to cheating set out in University Regulations. The Head(s) of the Department(s) responsible for the module(s) concerned (or his/her authorised deputy) shall present the case and shall have a right to call witnesses to appear before the Committee. The Chair of the appropriate Examiners' Board (or his/her authorised deputy where the Chair of the Examiners' Board is the Head of the Department responsible for the module(s) concerned) shall be in attendance in an advisory capacity.

(7) If he/she wishes, the student shall have the right to appear before the Investigating Committee, and he/she may invite any one other person to attend the Committee. The name and status of any person accompanying the student must be notified to the Chair of the Investigating Committee via the Academic Registrar in advance of the meeting. The student shall also have the right to request any witnesses to appear before the Committee and/or to provide the Committee with a written statement prior to its meeting.

(8) If the Investigating Committee is not satisfied that an offence has taken place, the student shall be informed and the matter shall end there. The Chair of the Investigating Committee may also take Chair's action to dismiss a case prior to any committee meeting if s/he judges that there is no case to answer.

(9) If the Investigating Committee is satisfied that an offence has taken place it shall:

(a) determine the penalty and inform the secretary of the appropriate Board of Examiners and the student accordingly. The maximum penalty shall not normally exceed a mark of zero in that unit of study* in which the piece of work is being assessed (with or without the opportunity to resubmit or undertake a further assessment) but in appropriate cases the Committee shall have the power to impose a more severe penalty, it being understood that such a penalty would be imposed without prejudice to the provisions of the Disciplinary Regulations. The Investigating Committee may refer cases it considers appropriate to the University Discipline Committee, sanctions available to the Discipline Committee including termination of the student's registration, or

(b) where the offence relates to an assessment which contributed to the previous approval of an academic award or honour to the candidate, make such recommendations to the Senate (or to the Senate Steering Committee acting on the Senate's behalf) to take such action under University Statutes, Ordinances and Regulations as it may consider appropriate (including that the previous academic award or honour to the candidate should be revoked).

(10) (a) The student shall have the right to appeal against either the decision of the Investigating Committee or the penalty, to an appeal committee appointed by the Vice-Chancellor (or his nominee), consisting of a Pro-Vice-Chancellor (as Chair) together with not fewer than two of the Chairs of the Faculty Boards or two of the Chairs of the Faculty Undergraduate or Graduate Studies Committees, as appropriate (or their nominees). No member of the relevant Investigating Committee shall also be a member of the appeal committee. Any appeal must be submitted in writing to the Academic Registrar within ten days. of the notification of the Investigating Committee’s decision to the student.

(b) The appeal committee will consider appeals from students made on the following grounds:

(i) that there was a material irregularity or failure in procedure in the conduct of the original hearing before the Investigating Committee;

(ii) that relevant evidence has come to light which the appellant was unable to present to the Investigating Committee at the original hearing;

(iii) that in light of new evidence the penalty imposed by the Investigating Committee is excessive in relation to the offence committed.

(c) Appeals shall be considered initially by the Chair of the appeal committee in consultation with one other member of the committee to establish that a prima facie case for appeal exists. Appeals shall not be considered where, in the opinion of the Chair and the consulted member of the appeal committee, the appellant has failed to bring the appeal within any of the grounds listed under (b)(i) - (iii) above.

(d) In considering any appeal the appeal committee shall take into account the definitions in relation to cheating set out in the University Regulations, and, if relevant, the Faculty and/or departmental instructions in relation to assessed work.

(e) If he/she wishes, the appellant shall have the right to appear before the appeal committee, and he/she may invite any one other person to attend the committee. The name and status of any person accompanying the student must be notified to the Chair of the committee via the Academic Registrar in advance of the meeting.

(f) The Head(s) of the Department(s) responsible for the module(s) concerned (or his/her authorised deputy) shall be at the committee and shall be invited to present a response to the appeal.

(g) If required, the Chair of the Investigating Committee shall be asked to attend the appeal committee to answer any questions concerning the Investigating Committee’s original decision, but shall attend for this purpose only and shall not remain present throughout the appeal hearing.

(h) The appeal committee shall have power to confirm or to set aside the decision of the Investigating Committee, or to set aside or vary the penalty imposed by the Investigating Committee. The decisions of the appeal committee shall be final and shall be communicated to the secretary of the appropriate Board of Examiners.

(11) In cases where cheating is proven and the circumstances are such that it is appropriate for the University to inform a regulatory body for the student's intended profession of the finding, the Academic Registrar shall be responsible for informing the regulatory body.

*A unit of study is defined as that part of a student work load, in a given year, which is allocated an approved separate examination weighting by the appropriate body.

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Regulation 23 Student Disciplinary Offences

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/disciplinary

(1) Definition of Misconduct

1.1 Misconduct is defined as improper interference in the broadest sense with the proper functioning or activities of the institution, or with those who work or study in the institution, or action which otherwise damages the institution whether on University premises or elsewhere.

1.2 Misconduct is classed as either minor or major depending on the seriousness of the alleged offence, and the specific procedures for each are set out below.

1.3 Examples only of offences which would normally be regarded as minor offences are:

  • a first or single breach of University regulations or policies e.g. smoking in non-designated areas, ignoring fire alarms, bringing a shopping trolley onto campus;

  • refusal to respond to reasonable requests by University staff;

  • anti-social conduct, including causing a public nuisance by drunkenness or disorderly conduct;

  • minor damage to property.

1.4 Examples only of what would normally be regarded as major offences are:

  • a serious or persistent breach of University regulations or policies;

  • repeated or persistent minor offences, or multiple concurrent minor offences;

  • refusal to pay a fine or observe another penalty imposed under these regulations;

  • repeated parking offences;

  • offences in connection with degree, diploma or certificate examinations;

  • falsification or serious misuse of University records, including degree or diploma certificates;

  • false pretences or impersonation of others, within or outside the University, in connection with academic attainments or financial awards;

  • theft, fraud, misapplication of or gross negligence in connection with funds or property of any kind;

  • assault or causing physical harm;

  • threatening, offensive or indecent behaviour;

  • riotous or disorderly conduct causing serious damage to or on University property or premises or seriously affecting good order within or outside the University;

  • offences against the criminal law, where these offences involve other students or directly affect the interests of the University;

  • bullying, harassment or other breach of the Dignity at Work and Study Policy;

  • conduct which, by whatever means, seriously disrupts or prejudices the work of other members or employees of the University or disrupts members of the public using University premises;

  • conduct which, by whatever means, interferes with the normal operation of the University’s business or which is likely to bring the University into disrepute.

1.5 The most serious offences, such as assaulting University staff in the course of their duties, shall normally warrant the most severe of penalties, i.e. expulsion and permanent withdrawal from the University.

1.6 In all cases where in his/her opinion the gravity of the offence appears to warrant it or the appropriate penalty might be beyond the limit fixed for a minor offence, the University officer to whom the case has been reported is obliged to report the case to the Registrar. It shall be the responsibility of the Registrar to determine whether the case shall be considered under the major offences procedure.

(2) Basis of Jurisdiction

2.1 All students of the University are subject to the jurisdiction of the Vice-Chancellor and the Senate, in respect both of their studies and their conduct.

2.2 This Regulation deals with student misconduct as defined in section 1 above. Offences under Ordinances and other Regulations, Codes and Policies may be dealt with under this Regulation where stated in those Regulations and Codes, or where the Registrar considers the gravity of the offence requires such action, but normally would be dealt with under the most relevant Ordinance, Regulation or Policy. Those include, but are not limited to:

  • Ordinance 17 Parking and Traffic in the University

  • Ordinance 18 Health and Safety in the University

  • Regulation 11 Procedure to be adopted in the event of suspected cheating in a University test

  • Regulation 22 General Library Regulations

  • Regulation 25 Parking and Traffic

  • Regulation 26 Safety Regulations

  • Regulation 27 Residential Accommodation Regulations

  • Regulation 29 Meetings on University Premises

  • Regulation 31 Use of University Computing Facilities

  • Dignity at Work and Study Policy

  • Policy on recording of lectures by students

2.3 Offences which take place on licensed University premises may also be subject to action, which may include a ban from the premises for a fixed period of time, by the licensee, who has a legal duty not to permit drunken, violent, quarrelsome or disorderly conduct to take place on the premises.

2.4 The Students’ Union operates separate disciplinary regulations to which its members are also subject.

2.5 Where a disciplinary penalty is imposed on a student in accordance with these regulations for a major offence and that student is also an employee of the University or any of its subsidiaries or a member of the Residential Life Team, the authorised officer as defined in section 6 or the Registrar should notify the Director of Human Resources or the senior officer responsible for Student Support for consideration as to whether any further action is required.

2.6 Where at any point in the disciplinary process there is concern about a student’s health or capacity to study the Registrar may refer the matter to be dealt with by a Continuation of Registration Committee in accordance with Regulation 36 (Regulations governing Student Registration, Attendance and Progress). In such a case the disciplinary process will normally be suspended until the Registrar determines that it should be reactivated.

(3) General Principles

3.1 Any officer named in this Regulation may appoint a nominee to act on his/her behalf, and references to that officer shall be taken to include reference to such a nominee.

3.2 No-one involved in deciding an appeal under this Regulation shall have had a prior involvement with the disciplinary case.

3.3 A student who is charged with a disciplinary offence under this Regulation will always be specifically informed of the details of the alleged offence and given the opportunity to defend him/herself. During any investigation of that disciplinary offence, the student will be notified that he/she is under investigation and that he/she should approach his/her Personal Tutor, the Department or University Senior Tutor, Warden, or the Students’ Union for advice as to procedure and the action which he/she may take.

3.4 A student charged with a minor offence may be accompanied at any meeting with the authorised officer or any disciplinary or appeal hearing by another student from the University or a member of staff from the University or Students’ Union. A student charged with a major offence may be accompanied at any meeting with the Investigating Officer or any disciplinary or appeal hearing by any one other person. The student will normally be expected to speak on his/her own behalf in his/her own defence.

3.5 Where a student does not appear on the date appointed for a hearing under this Regulation, and the authorised officer or committee is satisfied that the student has received notice to appear and has not provided a satisfactory explanation for his/her absence, the authorised officer or committee may proceed to deal with the case and if appropriate, impose an appropriate penalty in the absence of the student.

3.6 The Discipline Committee or the Appeals Committee will also be subject to any further University guidelines approved by the Senate. Subject to the terms of this Regulation and any such guidelines, an authorised officer or committee has the power to determine his/her/its own procedure for hearing a case, always providing that he/she/it observes the rules of natural justice at each stage. The authorised officer or committee may postpone, continue or adjourn the case at his/her/its discretion. The hearings of the Discipline Committee or the Appeals Committee will normally be serviced by a Secretariat appointed by the Registrar.

3.7 Both the student and the University may call witnesses to give evidence at any disciplinary hearing, provided that details of witnesses (and copies of any written evidence or other documents) are provided in advance of the hearing. Witnesses may be questioned by both parties and the authorised officer or committee hearing the case.

3.8 In all cases a written record of the proceedings will be kept, and, where appropriate, a précis of the statements of witnesses given during the hearing.

3.9 The student will be notified in writing of the outcome of any formal disciplinary process under this Regulation.

3.10 In cases where guilt is admitted or the charge is proved, a record of the offence and of the sentence will be filed, by the authorised officer or Committee Secretariat concerned, in the office of the Registrar.

3.11 The outcome of any disciplinary or appeal hearing will include a determination as to the length of time for which the decision will be retained on the student’s University record. Where the student has been either temporarily or permanently withdrawn on the grounds of disciplinary action, this will form part of the student’s formal record and transcript.

3.12 The University may vary any part of this Regulation in order to comply with its duty to make reasonable adjustments for people with disabilities.

(4) Precautionary Suspension

4.1 Where a student’s conduct may pose a risk to other students or University staff or where a student’s continued access to University facilities may interfere with the investigation of an offence, the student may be suspended from classes, any part of the University or the University as a whole, at the Vice-Chancellor’s discretion, pending the conclusion of any action under these regulations and/or any criminal proceedings. This suspension is not a sanction, but is used to protect the University community or reputation or a particular member or members of the University.

4.2 The reasons for the suspension will be put in writing and will be subject to periodic review on an at least bi-monthly basis and the student will be informed of the outcome of the review. The student may request a review of the suspension if there is a relevant change in his/her circumstances. The request should be made in writing to the Vice-Chancellor, who will respond within ten University working days.

4.3 Where the student is also an employee of the University or any of its subsidiaries or a member of the Residential Life team, the Vice-Chancellor should notify the Director of Human Resources or the senior officer responsible for Student Support for consideration as to whether any further action is required.

(5) Criminal Conduct

5.1 The fact that criminal proceedings have been instituted or have concluded does not preclude the University from taking its own disciplinary action, if it is thought fitting or necessary to do so.

5.2 The fact that the Police are unable or unwilling to proceed does not preclude the University from taking its own disciplinary action.

(6) Minor Offences

6.1 Authorised officers

6.1.1 The Senate has authorised certain University officers to deal, in the first instance, with minor offences:

  • The Pro-Vice-Chancellors

  • The Registrar

  • The Deputy Registrar

  • The Academic Registrar

  • The senior officer responsible for Student Support

  • The Librarian, who will exercise his/her power only in matters relating to the Library

  • The Wardens, Deputy Wardens, Senior Wardens, Sub-Wardens and Resident Tutors of the student residences, who will exercise their power only in relation to incidents occurring in student residences and their immediate confines

  • The senior officer responsible for Information Technology Services, who will exercise his/her disciplinary powers only in relation to the University’s computing facilities as defined in Regulation 31

  • Such other officers as the Registrar may nominate from time to time

6.1.2 When an alleged minor offence is reported to an authorised officer he/she will carry out any investigation he/she deems appropriate (or may appoint a member of the University staff to investigate on his/her behalf).

6.1.3 The authorised officer shall determine whether the student should be charged with a minor offence or whether the matter is more serious and should be referred to the Registrar for action under the major offences procedure.

6.2 Penalties

6.2.1 The authorised officer may impose one or more of the following penalties for a minor offence:

  • A fine not normally exceeding £100

  • A penalty not exceeding what is prescribed in the appropriate regulations (e.g. Library or Residential Accommodation regulations)

  • A reprimand

  • A written warning as to future conduct

  • A requirement to apologise and/or to undertake community service

  • A suspension of academic or other privileges for a period not exceeding one term

  • A requirement to make good the cost in whole or in part of any damage caused and/or repay/make good any financial loss to the University

  • Reclassification of the offence as a major offence and referral to the Registrar for action under the major offences procedure.

6.2.2 The authorised officer may suspend the implementation of any penalty subject to conditions notified to the student.

6.2.3 The limits of these penalties may be reviewed periodically by authority of the Senate.

6.3 Key procedural elements (supported by University guidelines)

6.3.1 The student will be notified in writing of the alleged minor offence and invited to a hearing conducted by the authorised officer.

6.3.2 If the student admits the alleged offence the authorised officer may dispense with the hearing and proceed to impose a disciplinary penalty in accordance with paragraph 6.2 above.

(7) Minor offences: Appeals

7.1 Right of appeal

7.1.1 The student has a right of appeal to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor against the authorised officer’s decision and/or any penalty imposed under this Regulation and any other Regulations, Codes or Policies that refer to it. The student must exhaust any appeal process set out in other Regulations, Codes or Policies before bringing an appeal under these provisions.

7.1.2 The Deputy Vice-Chancellor, or should there be no serving Deputy Vice-Chancellor, the Vice-Chancellor, may appoint a Pro-Vice-Chancellor to deal with the appeal (and all references to the Deputy Vice-Chancellor in this paragraph 7 shall include reference to that Pro-Vice-Chancellor).

7.1.3 The Deputy Vice-Chancellor will consider appeals made on the following grounds:

a) that there was a material irregularity or failure in procedure in the conduct of the original hearing or appeal;

b) that there appears to be evidence of prejudice or of bias during the original hearing or appeal;

c) that relevant evidence has come to light which the appellant was unable to present to the authorised officer at the original hearing or appeal;

d) that in light of new evidence the penalty imposed by the authorised officer is excessive in relation to the offence committed.

7.2 Key procedural elements (supported by University guidelines)

7.2.1 The student must submit the appeal in writing to the Registrar on behalf of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, stating the grounds on which the appeal is brought, within 42 days of the authorised officer’s decision, together with any new evidence should the appeal be made under 7.1.3(c) above.

7.2.2 Prior to consideration of the appeal by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, the Registrar shall consider the appeal to establish that a prima facie case for appeal exists. Appeals should not be considered where, in the opinion of the Registrar, the appellant has failed to bring the appeal within any of the grounds listed in paragraph 7.1.3 above. Should a case have been initially brought by the Registrar as an authorised officer under 6.1.1, the Deputy Registrar would normally undertake this consideration.

7.2.3 If there are prima facie grounds for appeal the Deputy Vice-Chancellor will undertake a review of the case and may request such further information as he/she deems appropriate. He/she will not normally hold a hearing but may choose to do so, in which case the authorised officer and the appellant will be invited to attend, and the hearing will be conducted in accordance with the principles set out at paragraph 3.6 above.

7.2.4 In determining appeals, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor may set aside, vary or confirm the decision of the authorised officer or may set aside or vary the penalty imposed.

7.2.5 The decision of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor on an appeal is final, and the student will be issued with a completion of procedures letter.

(8) Major Offences

8.1 Investigation

8.1.1 When an alleged major offence is reported to the Registrar he/she shall appoint an Investigating Officer to carry out an investigation of the case. The Investigating Officer shall have the power to carry out such investigations as he/she deems appropriate, including interviewing the student and any other witnesses.

8.1.2 Having received the report of the Investigating Officer, the Registrar shall determine whether further investigation is necessary or whether a charge should be brought forward and if so, whether the student should be charged with a major offence or whether the matter is less serious and should be dealt with by the Registrar as a minor offence.

8.2 The Discipline Committee

8.2.1 The Discipline Committee deals with major offences.

8.2.2 The membership of the Discipline Committee is normally as follows:

  • Chair – a Pro-Vice-Chancellor appointed by the Vice-Chancellor

  • Three academic staff members appointed by the Vice-Chancellor from a panel of up to 20 members appointed by the Senate on the recommendation of the Faculty Boards

  • Two student members (normally sabbatical officers of the Students’ Union) whose names shall be communicated to the Registrar by the President of the Students’ Union.

8.2.3 The quorum of the Discipline Committee is three members, one of whom shall be a student member unless the student charged with the offence objects (see paragraph 8.4.2).

8.3 Penalties

8.3.1 The Discipline Committee may impose one or more of the following penalties in respect of a major offence:

  • A reprimand

  • A requirement to apologise

  • A penalty as prescribed in any other appropriate regulations

  • A fine

  • A requirement to undertake community service

  • A requirement to make good the cost in whole or in part of any damage caused, and/or repay/make good any financial loss to the University

  • A suspension from academic or other privileges for a specified period

  • Exclusion from campus or parts of the campus for a specified period

  • Complete suspension of student status and exclusion from campus for a fixed period (i.e. temporary withdrawal from the University)

  • Expulsion (i.e. permanent withdrawal) from the University

8.3.2 Where the student is registered on a course which falls within Regulation 34 (Regulation for the Determination of Fitness to Practise) the Discipline Committee must in addition refer the matter to be dealt with in accordance with that Regulation.

8.3.3 The Discipline Committee may suspend the implementation of any penalty subject to conditions notified to the student.

8.4 Key procedural elements (supported by University guidelines)

8.4.1 A student charged with a major offence will receive a written summons, giving a brief but clear specification of the charge and giving him/her at least ten University working days’ notice to appear before the Discipline Committee.

8.4.2 Together with the written summons, the student will be notified that:

a) unless he/she expresses a wish to the contrary before the date of the hearing, students will sit as members of the Discipline Committee;

b) he/she should submit any response to the charge, and notify the Registrar of any evidence he/she wishes to rely on, at least five University working days before the date fixed for the hearing;

c) he/she should approach his/her Personal Tutor, the Department or University Senior Tutor, Warden, or the Students’ Union for advice as to procedure and the action which he/she may take.

8.4.3 If the student wishes to admit the charge, he/she may do so in writing to the Registrar on receipt of the summons. He/she shall be heard in mitigation before any penalty is determined. The Discipline Committee may deal with mitigation in writing if the student consents to this.

8.4.4 The student may also admit the charge or part of it at any stage of the proceedings.

8.4.5 The University’s case will be presented by the Registrar or a member of the Registrar’s staff appointed by him/her. The evidence on behalf of the student (should he/she wish to give evidence) will then be heard.

8.4.6 Both the student and the member of the University staff presenting the case shall be allowed to make a final address, the student normally having the last word.

8.4.7 The student and anyone accompanying him/her and the member of the University staff presenting the case will withdraw while the Discipline Committee considers its decision, and return to hear it delivered.

8.4.8 If the Discipline Committee finds the charge proved, the student shall be heard in mitigation before any penalty is determined. The Discipline Committee may deal with mitigation in writing if the student consents to this. In determining the penalty, the Discipline Committee shall take into account any record of previous misconduct.

(9) Major offences: Right of Appeal

9.1 Appeals Committee of Senate

9.1.1 The student has a right of appeal from any decision of the Discipline Committee to the Appeals Committee of the Senate.

9.1.2 The Appeals Committee will consider appeals made on the following grounds:

a) that there was a material irregularity or failure in procedure in the conduct of the original hearing;

b) that there appears to be evidence of prejudice or of bias during the original hearing;

c) that relevant evidence has come to light which the appellant was unable to present to the authorised officer at the original hearing;

d) that in light of new evidence the penalty imposed by the authorised officer is excessive in relation to the offence committed.

9.1.3 The membership of the Appeals Committee is as follows:

  • Chair – the Deputy Vice-Chancellor or a Pro-Vice-Chancellor acting on behalf of the Vice-Chancellor and appointed by the Vice-Chancellor

  • Three academic staff members appointed by the Vice-Chancellor from a panel of up to 20 members appointed by the Senate on the recommendation of the Faculty Boards

  • Two student members (normally sabbatical officers of the Students’ Union) whose names shall be communicated to the Registrar by the President of the Students’ Union.

9.1.4 The appeal hearing will normally take the form of a review unless the Appeals Committee decides that a new hearing is required.

9.2 Key procedural elements (supported by University guidelines)

9.2.1 The student has 42 days following the written notification of the decision of the Discipline Committee in which to make an appeal (in writing, to the Registrar, acting on behalf of the Vice-Chancellor) for a hearing by the Appeals Committee of the Senate. The appeal may be either against the decision of the Discipline Committee or against the penalty and should state briefly the grounds on which it is made.

9.2.2 Appeals shall be considered initially by the Chair of the Appeals Committee in consultation with one other member of the committee to establish that a prima facie case for appeal exists. Appeals shall not be considered where, in the opinion of the Chair and the consulted member of the Appeals Committee, the appellant has failed to bring the appeal within any of the grounds listed in paragraph 9.1.2 above.

9.2.3 The Appeals Committee (through the Registrar) will give the appellant at least ten University working days’ notice of the date of the appeal hearing.

9.2.4 The appellant will be provided with a copy of the written record of the proceedings of the Discipline Committee. The Discipline Committee may prepare its own report to the Appeals Committee in addition to the written record of proceedings, with such comments as it may wish to make on the reliability of evidence. This report will also be made available to the appellant.

9.2.5 The Appeals Committee has power on cause shown to permit the appellant to call or present additional evidence, in which event the member of the Registrar’s staff responsible for the presentation of the disciplinary case may be permitted to call or present further evidence to meet any new or additional issues raised by the appellant.

9.2.6 At the hearing, the appellant will be the first party to address the Appeals Committee.

9.2.7 The member of the Discipline Committee responsible for responding to the appeal will then address the Appeals Committee.

9.2.8 The appellant and anyone accompanying him/her and the member of the Discipline Committee will withdraw while the Appeals Committee considers its decision, and return to hear it delivered.

9.2.9 In the case of an adverse decision (except in appeals solely against penalty) the appellant may make a plea in mitigation of penalty.

9.2.10 The Appeals Committee has power to confirm, set aside or vary a finding or decision of the Discipline Committee or to set aside or vary any penalty imposed by the Discipline Committee. The Appeals Committee may in addition refer the matter to be dealt with under Regulation 34 (Regulation for the Determination of Fitness to Practise).

9.2.11 The decision of the Appeals Committee is final, and the student will be issued with a completion of procedures letter.

9.2.12 Where a student is expelled or temporarily withdrawn from the University and is resident in University or University-managed accommodation, the University may take further action under Regulation 27 (Residential Accommodation Regulations).

Where a student is expelled or temporarily withdrawn from the University, the University may be required to notify government or other regulatory agencies.

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Regulation 31 Regulations governing the use of University Computing

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/computing/

DEFINITIONS

Computing Facilities means:

(a) any computer or device capable of storing data in electronic form owned, operated or loaned by the University whether connected to the University’s information network/s or not; and/or

(b) any computer or device capable of storing data in electronic form owned or operated by someone other than the University when connecting to the University’s information networks or used to gain access to the University’s information network; and/or

(c) any computer or device capable of storing data in electronic form owned or operated by someone other than the University when used for University Business; and/or

(d) any software or information provided or created for University Business; and/or

(e) any Cloud or hosted or similar service through which University information is stored and/or services are provided for the University to enable Users to undertake University Business, including without limitation, accessing an on- line learning platform, accessing “Software as a Service’, using their University email account, or electronic resources provided through the University’s Library.

University means the University of Warwick and any of its associated companies.

University Business means any activity conducted either in the course of employment or as part of or related to a University course or other University activity that is not purely personal.

Users means all people authorised to use the Computing Facilities for any purpose, including but not limited to students, staff, visitors to the University and members of partner organisations.

REGULATION STATEMENT

2.1 This Regulation is one of a number of regulations, policies, codes and guidelines which form part of the University’s Information Security framework. This Regulation is intended to protect the Computing Facilities against unauthorised access, misuse and harm and promote effective and secure communication when using the Computing Facilities.

2.2 All Users of the Computing Facilities are required to abide by this Regulation and should report any suspected, attempted or actual breaches of this Regulation to the Registrar or his/her nominee as soon as reasonably practicable via emailing informationsecurity@warwick.ac.uk.

2.3 Any attempted or actual breach of this Regulation and any other related policies in Clause 9 may lead to the suspension or withdrawal of a user’s authorisation and may constitute an offence under the University disciplinary procedures.

2.4 Any breach of this Regulation by a student may be dealt with under our disciplinary procedures, including as a major disciplinary offence under the University Reg. 23 Disciplinary Regulations. Please see these Regulations at www.warwick.ac.uk/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/disciplinary/.

2.5 This Regulation forms part of the terms and conditions of appointment of members of staff. Breaches by staff may be dealt with under the disciplinary procedures contained in those terms and conditions.

2.6 The University may also take any appropriate legal or other action against any User.

2.7 Departments who provide locally managed University Computing Facilities may issue appropriate policies, procedures and guidance specific to the use of these local Facilities. These should support and not contravene this Regulation or any other part of the University Information Security Framework.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE REGULATION

3.1 University managers and Heads of Departments will ensure that they and all Users in their designated area abide by this Regulation and understand the standards of behaviour expected of them. University managers and Heads of Departments will notify the Registrar or his/her nominee as soon as possible if they consider there may have been a breach of this Regulation via emailing informationsecurity@warwick.ac.uk.

SECURITY

4.1 All Users are responsible for the security of the Computing Facilities and any University data contained on them and will not act in any way to harm the Computing Facilities. Users should ensure they log off or lock any Computing Facilities when they are not being used.

4.2 Users must guard against the loss or theft of portable Computing Facilities and will let the Registrar or his/her nominee know immediately if any Computing Facilities are lost or stolen via emailing informationsecurity@warwick.ac.uk.

4.3 Users will abide by the Code of Practice for the Use of Computer Work Areas issued from time to time by the Director of IT Services when they use Computing Facilities in IT Services provided work areas. Please see this Code athttp://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/its/servicessupport/workareas/codeofconduct/.

4.4 Where Users of the Computing Facilities are issued with a University username and password, they will not share their University password with another person, or use their University password as login credentials for any non-University account.

4.5 All Users using their own devices to access Computing Facilities must use a password or PIN to secure access to ‘reserved’ or’ restricted’* data kept or accessed on such devices to ensure that this data is protected in the event of loss or theft.

*Please refer to University information classifications at www.warwick.ac.uk/gov/informationsecurity

4.6 Users will let the Registrar or his/her nominee know immediately if their password has been compromised via emailing informationsecurity@warwick.ac.uk. Users may be responsible for use under their own name and password prior to such notification.

4.7 Users shall not attempt to gain access to any part of the Computing Facilities, or data stored thereon, without proper authorisation.

4.8 Users will not knowingly introduce any viruses or other harmful programs or similar computer code designed to adversely affect the operation of any computer software or hardware onto the Computing Facilities and will notify the Registrar or his/her nominee via emailinginformationsecurity@warwick.ac.uk if they are concerned this may have occurred.

4.9 Users should not delete, destroy or modify existing University systems, information or data contained on the Computing Facilities without due authorisation.

INAPPROPRIATE USE OF COMPUTING FACILITIES

5.1 Users shall not use the Computing Facilities or any e-mail or Internet services used on the Computing Facilities:

5.1.1 To view, create, transmit or store material which could be considered inappropriate, offensive, obscene, indecent, abusive, harassing, derogatory or defamatory and/or adversely affect the reputation of the University. Where such a question might arise, in the case of academic activity, or any other matter, prior permission should be sought in writing from the Registrar or his/her nominee; or

5.1.2 For any unlawful or fraudulent act, including infringing the copyright of another person; or

5.1.3 To send unsolicited or unauthorised advertising, promotional or any other similar material, save where that material is embedded within, or is otherwise part of, a service to which the user or the University has chosen to subscribe.

PERSONAL USE OF COMPUTING FACILITIES OWNED OR OPERATED BY UNIVERSITY

6.1 Incidental, reasonable personal use of all Computing Facilities owned or operated by the University is permitted provided the use is minimal, does not interfere with University commitments, does not put the University in disrepute and does not contravene our Internet Service Provider’s policy on acceptable use.

MONITORING

7.1 This Regulation is subject to and must be read in accordance with the University’s Statement on Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000. Please see this Statement at: www.warwick.ac.uk/gov/informationsecurity/ .

7.2 Under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, the University may monitor or intercept any information contained or services used on the Computing Facilities or information networks, including e-mails, files and access logs in particular circumstances. For example, the University would be able to investigate if a breach of this Regulation is suspected.

7.3 Users should not store, send or use private or confidential information on the Computing Facilities that they do not want the University to see. The University cannot be held responsible for the deletion or removal of such information in the course of routine software or hardware maintenance or service improvement.

7.4 This Regulation on the privacy and the interception of electronic communications is intended to achieve a balance between the rights of individuals and the need to protect users and the University from the consequences of misuse, illegal activity or activity in breach of this Regulation.

CHARGEABLE SERVICES

8.1 The University may levy charges for any use of the Computer Facilities as appropriate.

8.2 Users shall declare all use of the Computing Facilities for private commercial purposes in accordance with Financial Procedures 10 governing Private Work and other Appointments and/or 13 covering the exploitation of Intellectual Property (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/finance/resources/regulations/) and in connection with research projects where outside funds for computing costs are available.

COMPLIANCE WITH RELATED POLICIES AND AGREEMENTS

9.1 All Users shall comply with all other relevant regulations, policies, codes and procedures in relation to the Computing Facilities, including but not limited to:

9.1.1 The University’s Information Security framework and other documentation issued from time to time by the Director of IT Services and the Deputy Registrar. Please see these at www.warwick.ac.uk/gov/informationsecurity/.

9.1.2 The University’s Internet Service Provider is Janet. The Janet policy on acceptable use when using Computing Facilities to create, store or disseminate information or to access external computer networks or other computer based communication systems. Please see this Policy at:http://www.ja.net/services/publications/policy/aup.html.

The University’s Code of Conduct for the Use of Software when using software made available by the University. Please see this Code at:http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/its/about/policies/software/.

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Regulation 36 Regulations Governing Student Registration

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/reg36registrationattendanceprogress/

Notes

1. Where a University officer or Head of Department is named in the Regulation, this refers to the member of staff concerned or his/her authorised nominee.

2. Points in italics are included for information.

This Regulation sets out requirements for registration, enrolment, attendance and progress. It includes expectations of students and information on penalties that may be imposed if these are not met. It sets out procedures for requiring a student to withdraw. This applies to all students following a University course, whether they are based at Warwick or elsewhere, for the duration of their course of study.

More information on specific course requirements, including course duration and assessment methods, is set out by academic departments and in the Course Regulations.

Advice for international students on the implications of any changes to their registration for their right to remain in the UK is available from the Immigration Service in the International Office.

Students should also refer to the University’s Dignity at Work and Study Policy and the Disciplinary Regulations for further information on student behaviour within the University community.

36.1 Registration

This section sets out requirements for registration and enrolment. It includes information on temporary withdrawal, voluntary years out and the granting of student status to elected Sabbatical Officers in the Students’ Union.

Enrolment

1. All students are required to maintain registration with the University by enrolling and re-enrolling when asked to do so. By enrolling students confirm that they agree to observe the University’s Charters, Statutes, Ordinances and Regulations, and to submit to the University’s discipline for the duration of their course.

2. Any student who fails to enrol or re-enrol within five weeks of being asked to do so may be required to withdraw from their course of study by the Academic Registrar. A student may appeal against this decision under section 5 of this Regulation.

Provisional enrolment

3. Students who have not met all the requirements associated with the offer of a place at the University at the point of enrolment may be allowed to enrol provisionally, at the discretion of the Academic Registrar. Students in this category are expected to provide satisfactory evidence that they have met these requirements within a time period specified at enrolment. If a student does not provide satisfactory evidence by this deadline, the Academic Registrar may make a recommendation to the Chair of the Committee on Admission of Students to Courses of Study that the student be required to withdraw under section 36.4.3.

Withdrawal

4. A student may withdraw permanently from the University or a course of study at any point, through notifying the Academic Office in writing.

Temporary withdrawal

5. A student may ask to withdraw from the University temporarily, normally on health or personal grounds. Requests for a period of temporary withdrawal, supported by medical evidence if appropriate, should be made initially to the Head of Department and then to the Academic Office.

6. A student will not normally be allowed to withdraw temporarily for more than two consecutive years, or for more than a total of two years over the duration of a course.

7. Students are not permitted to attend classes either formally or informally during a period of temporary withdrawal or resit without residence. However, to help students prepare for their return to study or sitting examinations access to University IT facilities and the Library will normally continue during a period of temporary withdrawal or resit without residence.

8. Return to the University following a period of temporary withdrawal may be subject to conditions. Any conditions will be set out when the request to withdraw temporarily is approved. If these conditions have not been met at the point of return to the University, the student will not be allowed to re-enrol without the written agreement of the Academic Registrar.

9. Students registered for some part-time taught courses may be permitted to suspend their studies, if this is set out under the relevant Course Regulations. In this instance, a student may request a suspension for a period of up to twelve months. The maximum consecutive period of suspension will normally be three years. The maximum period of registration set out within the Course Regulations will apply. This provision should not be used in cases where a student wishes to seek temporary withdrawal on health or personal grounds, when the procedure set out in point 36.1.5 should be followed.

Voluntary Year Out for work experience

10. A student may make a request to take a voluntary year out for work experience, following guidelines for the Voluntary Year Out Scheme available from the Academic Office (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/studentrecords/students/placements/voluntary). These requests are considered by the Academic Registrar and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Teaching and Learning) on behalf of the Senate. If a request is approved, the student will be granted registered student status for this period.

Sabbatical officers

11. A full-time student elected to a sabbatical office in the Students’ Union may be granted leave of absence from their course, subject to approval by the Senate. A student may only be granted leave of absence on three separate occasions and for no more than two consecutive years.

12. The Senate may confer registered student status on students who have completed their course of study and have been elected to sabbatical office in the Students’ Union.

13. A student who is required to withdraw after election to a sabbatical office in the Students’ Union shall not be permitted to take up or continue any sabbatical office.

Requirement to withdraw

14. The University may require a student to withdraw either temporarily or permanently, through the procedures set out in University Regulations.


36.2 Satisfactory progress, attendance and completion of work

This section sets out general requirements and expectations in terms of progress, attendance and the completion of work. Further detail and requirements for courses of study is provided by departments.

Boards of Examiners and student progress

A student’s formal progress through an undergraduate or taught postgraduate course is determined by the Board of Examiners for the course in line with the relevant University Regulation. In cases where a Board of Examiners decides to require a student to withdraw, to award no qualification or to award a lower qualification than that for which a student is registered, the student has a right of appeal as set out in the Regulation for the course in question.

Information on course requirements

At the start of an academic year, each department provides students with information on the courses for which it is responsible. This will include information on classes, assessment, monitoring processes and any other requirements for students. This will include details of monitoring points identified by departments for each course.

Information on absence

The department will also provide details of procedures to be followed if a student is absent from classes and information on any penalties that may be imposed if a student fails to submit work required, submits work late or fails to attend classes without a reasonable explanation.

1. Students are expected to engage fully with their course of study, take responsibility for their own learning and co-operate with their department and wider University as members of the University community. Students must comply with the requirements for their course as set out by the department.

2. Students are expected to inform departments of any health problems, changes in circumstances or other difficulties that may affect their progress. If a student fails to inform the department, these circumstances cannot be taken into account.

3. Students may be required by the Head of Department to meet with staff in the department. Students may also be required to meet with administrative staff in the wider University.

4. If a student’s progress or behaviour persistently fails to meet the expectations set out in this Regulation and departmental course requirements, the Head of Department may recommend to a Continuation of Registration Committee that the student be required to withdraw (under section 36.4.4).

 36.3 Penalties for late submission or failure to attend classes

This section sets out penalties that may be imposed if a student submits work late or does not attend classes.

1. Heads of Departments may impose the penalties set out below for late submission of assessed work or failure to attend classes. If additional coursework or examination is required this will contribute to the student’s mark for that module, as determined by the Head of Department and module leader.

(a) For late submission, if no formal extension has been granted, a reduction in marks of 5 percentage points per working day for undergraduate students and 3 percentage points per working day for postgraduate students. Pieces of work with a credit value less than or equal to 2 CATS are exempt from this policy. Alternatively a Head of Department might require a student to submit additional coursework or sit an additional examination.

b) For failure to attend classes a requirement to submit additional coursework or sit an additional examination.

2. Before determining a penalty for failure to attend classes, the Head of Department will consult the module leader, the personal tutor of the student concerned and the departmental senior tutor. The student will be given 10 working days from notification to present their case to the Head of Department. The decision of the Head of Department is final and the student will be notified in writing.

3.In addition to the sanctions within departments, if a student is absent from classes for a period of at least five weeks or misses eight departmental monitoring points, the Academic Registrar may require the student to withdraw (under section 36.4.1). A student may appeal against this decision under section 5 of this Regulation.

36.4 Grounds and procedure for requiring a student to withdraw temporarily or permanently

This section sets out the grounds on which a student may be required to withdraw and the procedure to be followed. In all cases, a student has a right of appeal, under section 5 of this Regulation.

Under the University’s Statutes, the Vice-Chancellor may also suspend any student or exclude them from the University without notice. This provision is intended to protect members of the University and the University’s reputation.

Unexplained absence and failure to enrol

1. The Academic Registrar may require a student to withdraw under points 36.1.2 or 36.3.3 in the following circumstances:

(a) If a student fails to enrol within five weeks of being asked to do so.

(b) If a student is absent from classes for five weeks without a reasonable explanation or excuse.

(c) If a student misses eight departmental monitoring points without a reasonable explanation or excuse.

Immigration requirements

2. If a student does not hold an acceptable visa, in line with UK immigration requirements, the Academic Registrar may refuse to allow the student to enrol, require the student to withdraw temporarily or defer the offer of a place pending the issuing of a visa, or require the student to withdraw permanently.

Fraudulent information within an application or failure to meet entry requirements within a period of provisional enrolment

3. This procedure should be used if evidence arises that was not available at the point of admission to the University of the inclusion of fraudulent information within an application made by a student who is already enrolled (as set out in the Regulation on Admission to the University (6.3(d)), or if a student fails to meet entry requirements by the deadline set out at enrolment (under section 36.1.3).

(a) The Academic Registrar will advise the student in writing that a recommendation that the student should be required to withdraw is likely to be made. The student should be given the opportunity to make their case in person or in writing within 10 working days of notification.

(b) The Academic Registrar will consider the student’s explanation and may recommend to the Chair of the Committee on Admission of Students to Courses of Study that the student be required to withdraw.

(c) The Committee on Admission of Students to Courses of Study, appointed in line with Regulation 6(4)(a) will consider the case, in line with the Procedures for Committees dealing with student cases.

(d) The Committee may either uphold the recommendation requiring the student to withdraw or reject the recommendation. If the Chair rejects the recommendation, the student will be allowed to continue unless the student is registered on a professional course covered by Regulation 34 on Fitness to Practise. In this case the Chair should consult the Head of the relevant department to determine whether a Fitness to Practise Committee should be convened to consider the case.

(e) If the Committee upholds the recommendation requiring the student to withdraw, the student has a right of appeal under Section 5 of this Regulation.

Concern over attendance, progress, capacity to study, behaviour and re-admission following temporary withdrawal

4. A Head of Department or the Registrar may recommend to a Continuation of Registration Committee that a student be required to withdraw either temporarily or permanently on the grounds set out below. In all cases, the student should be advised in writing that a recommendation is likely to be made. The student should be given the opportunity to make their case in person or in writing within 10 working days of notification.

Concern over attendance or progress

(a) If a student’s attendance or progress is unsatisfactory, the Head of Department may recommend to a Continuation of Registration Committee that the student be required to withdraw.

Concern over capacity to study

(b) If a student’s health or personal circumstances are preventing them from continuing effectively with their course, the Head of Department or the Registrar may recommend to a Continuation of Registration Committee that the student be required to withdraw. In an emergency, if a student is unable to continue with the course, the Registrar may require the student to withdraw immediately on a temporary basis, pending a recommendation to a Continuation of Registration Committee.

Concern over behaviour

(c) If a student repeatedly behaves in a way that is unreasonable or inappropriate, the Registrar or Head of Department may recommend to a Continuation of Registration Committee that they be required to withdraw. If a student’s behaviour constitutes an offence under the Disciplinary Regulations, then the matter may be considered under the Disciplinary Regulations, either as an alternative to the Continuation of Registration process or alongside it.

Re-admission following temporary withdrawal

(d) If there is reasonable concern about the readmission of a student to the University as a result of information which becomes available during a period of temporary withdrawal the Academic Registrar may ask a Continuation of Registration Committee to consider whether or not the student should be permitted to re-enrol. This might apply if evidence becomes available regarding illegal activities or a clear risk of involvement in illegal activities.

Fitness to Practise

5. For students registered on the MB ChB, the MA/Diploma in Social Work, the PGCE or Counselling courses, the Head of Department may recommend that a case be referred to a Fitness to Practise Committee instead of or in addition to the Continuation of Registration Committee, in line with the University’s Fitness to Practise Regulations.

Constitution of Continuation of Registration Committees

6. A Continuation of Registration Committee shall be appointed by the Vice-Chancellor to consider any recommendations that a student be required to withdraw made under point 36.4.4 of this Regulation.

7. The Committee shall have three members, drawn from a panel appointed by the Senate. The Committee should not include any member of the student’s department or any other member of staff involved in the teaching or supervision of the student.

8. The panel appointed by the Senate will include the Chairs of the Undergraduate and Graduate Studies Committees of the Boards of the Faculties, the Chair of the Committee on Admission of Students to Courses of Study and up to 10 other members of academic staff.

9. A Continuation of Registration Committee may make the following decisions.

(a) To require the student to withdraw permanently from the University.

(b) To require the student to withdraw temporarily, in which case the Committee should determine the period of withdrawal and set out any conditions relating to the student’s return to the University.

(c) To allow the student to continue at the University.

(d) To allow the student to continue at the University, subject to any conditions relating to the student’s continued enrolment.

10. The student will be given at least 10 working days’ notice of the date of the Continuation of Registration Committee.

11. The Continuation of Registration Appeals Committee may take evidence from the Head of Department (or his/her authorised deputy), other departmental representatives (including chairs of boards of examiners if relevant) and others as it deems appropriate. The Head of Department, or his/her authorised deputy, must be available when the case is being considered to advise the Committee on departmental procedures.

Failure to submit a research thesis

12. The Academic Registrar may require a student registered for a research degree to withdraw if he/she fails to submit his/her thesis by the end of the period of study (as set out in University Regulation 38.3 Governing Research Degrees)

36.5 Procedure for appealing against a requirement to withdraw

Grounds for appeal

1.If a Continuation of Registration Committee or the Committee on the Admission of Students to Courses of Study requires a student to withdraw temporarily or permanently, the student has a right of appeal within 15 working days of notification. Appeals may be made on the following grounds:

(a) A procedural irregularity or unfair discrimination in the conduct of the Committee.

(b) That relevant evidence has become available which the student was unable to present to the Committee. In this instance, the student is required to explain why the evidence was not available earlier.

2. Students who are required to withdraw under points 36.4.1, 36.4.2, or 36.4.10 of this Regulation also have a right to appeal within 15 working days of notification. Appeals may be made on the following grounds:

(a) Procedural irregularity or unfair discrimination in the decision to require the student to withdraw.

(b) That relevant evidence has become available which the student was unable to present previously. In this instance, the student is required to explain why the evidence was not available earlier.

Preliminary Review Panel stage

3. An appeal will first be considered by a Preliminary Review Panel. The Preliminary Review Panel will be constituted under the Regulation relevant to the student’s course of study.

4. The Preliminary Review Panel will consider whether an appellant has brought his or her appeal within the grounds as set out in 36.5.1 or 36.5.2 above and may also consider the substance and merits of the case and whether the factors advanced by the appellant would have had relevance at the time of the Continuation of Registration Committee.

5. The Preliminary Review Panel must reject an appeal if it decides that:

(a) The student has not put forward any grounds for appeal, as allowed in Section 36.5.1 or 36.5.2.

(b) For appeals on the basis that relevant evidence has become available which the student was not able to present previously, the student has not put forward an explanation for the lack of availability of this evidence when the original decision was made to require the student to withdraw.

6. Where the Preliminary Review Panel considers that the evidence constitutes grounds for an appeal, the case will be referred to an Appeals Committee, constituted under the Regulations relevant to the student’s course of study.

7. The student and department will be notified of the reasons for the Preliminary Review Panel’s decision.

Appeals Committee stage

8. The student will be given at least 10 working days’ notice of the date of the Continuation of Registration Appeals Committee.

9. The Continuation of Registration Appeals Committee may take evidence from the Head of Department (or his/her authorised deputy), other departmental representatives (including chairs of boards of examiners if relevant) and others as it deems appropriate. The Head of Department, or his/her authorised deputy, must be available when the case is being considered to advise the Committee on departmental procedures.

10. An Appeals Committee may make the decisions set out below. The decision of the Appeals Committee is final.

(a) To reject the appeal, thus confirming the decision to require the student to withdraw permanently or temporarily. In the case of temporary withdrawal, an Appeals Committee may set out any conditions relating to the student’s return to the University.

(b) To uphold the appeal, thus allowing the student to continue at the University. An Appeals Committee may also put in place any conditions for the student’s continued enrolment that it deems appropriate.

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Regulation 8 Regulations for First Degrees

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/reg8to8_5_1/

8.1 Regulations for the Degree of BA (and for the Degrees of BSc and LLB Awarded on the Recommendation of the Board of the Faculty of Social Sciences)

(1) All candidates for the degree of BA will be admitted to an Honours course. The degree may, however, be conferred either as a degree with Honours or as a Pass degree.

(2) (a) Candidates for the degree must have followed an approved course of full-time study in the University, extending normally over not fewer than three academic years.

(b) On the recommendation of the appropriate Sub-Faculty or Undergraduate Studies Committee and the Board of the appropriate Faculty, the Senate may permit a suitably qualified candidate to be a full-time candidate for Honours in a second first degree course, which may be completed in less than three academic years.

(3) (a) In the Summer term, Boards of Examiners will consider the progress of candidates during the first year on the basis of such tests as may be approved by the Senate, together with candidates’ work in the first year and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to the second year of an Honours course; or

(ii) be permitted to take further tests in the Summer vacation; or

(iii) be recommended to withdraw from their course of study.

Candidates in category (iii) above may, if they wish, take further tests in the Summer vacation.

(b) Boards of Examiners will consider the results of the tests held in the Summer vacation together with candidates’ work in the first and in previous tests, and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to the second year of an Honours course; or

(ii) be permitted to proceed to a Pass course; or

(iii) be required to withdraw from their course of study.

(c) Exceptionally, a Board of Examiners may permit a candidate who has not passed the first-year tests to take further tests in a final attempt the following year without residence at the University; when considering the results of these further examinations the Board of Examiners may take any of the decisions open to it under paragraph (b) above.

(4) (a) Where the examination of courses contributing to final degree classification takes place before the final year of the degree programme, Boards of Examiners will consider in the Summer term of that year (or, where that is not possible, during the Summer vacation) the results of such tests as may be approved by the Senate, together with work done during the year, and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to the next year of an Honours degree programme; or

(ii) be permitted to proceed to the next year of a Pass degree programme; or

(iii) be required to proceed to the next year of a Pass degree programme but be permitted to take further tests in a final attempt the following Summer along with their other examinations; or

(iv) be permitted to take further tests in a final attempt the following Summer, without residence at the University; or

(v) be recommended to withdraw from their course of study.

(b) Candidates under 4(a)(v) above may, if they wish, take further tests as directed by the Board of Examiners, as under paragraphs 4(a)(iii) and 4(a) (iv) above.

(c) When considering a candidate resitting examinations as a result of the requirements of paragraphs 4(a)(iii) and 4(a)(iv) above, but not on the final year of the degree programme, Boards of Examiners will consider the results of the tests held in accordance with that paragraph together with the candidate’s work during the year and in previous tests, and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed, or take further tests as a final attempt the following year, as under paragraphs 4(a)(i)-4(a)(iv) above, except that candidates shall not be permitted to resit examinations which have already been resat; or

(ii) be required to withdraw from their course of study.

(d) Where a candidate on an intermediate year has no examinations contributing to final degree classification, a Board of Examiners or a Review Panel for the degree shall consider the work done by the candidate during the year and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to the next year of an Honours degree programme; or

(ii) be permitted to proceed to the next year of a Pass degree programme; or

(iii) be required to take further tests in the Summer vacation before proceeding to the next year of their course of study.

(e) (i) Candidates placed on a Pass Degree by a Board of Examiners or a Review Panel shall either:

(A) follow a reduced load leading to a Pass Degree; or

(B) be permitted by their Department(s) to take a full Honours load in order to facilitate reinstatement to Honours; or

(C) be required to take a full load in order to fulfil the requirements for a Pass Degree.

(ii) Reinstatement to Honours under (i)(B) above shall be either at the subsequent Board of Examiners or Review Panel or by recommendation (giving reasons) from the student’s department(s) to the appropriate Sub-Faculty or Undergraduate Studies Committee and Faculty Board in the course of the year.

(iii) In the final year of study the reduced load under (i)(A) above shall not normally exceed 80 per cent of the Honours load.

(5) The final examination or such part of it not previously taken will be held in the third year of a three-year degree course or the fourth year of a four-year degree course. The examination will consist of such tests as may be approved by the Senate. The Senate shall award the degree in accordance with decisions made by Boards of Examiners. The Senate may refer any decision of a Board of Examiners back to that Board for further consideration.

(6) In determining the category and class of degree to be awarded, Boards of Examiners may take into account the quality of candidates’ work throughout the degree course.

(a) The degree with Honours will be awarded in three classes, the second class being in two divisions.

(b) The Pass degree is an unclassified degree.

(7) (a) To be eligible for an Honours classification candidates must have followed the final year of an Honours degree programme, and, except as provided in paragraphs (3)(c) and (4)(a)(iv) above or by special permission of the Senate, must have completed the requirements for the degree in the number of years approved for the degree programme.

(b) Boards of Examiners may decide that a candidate in the final Honours examination should be awarded a Pass degree, subject to the candidate having met the requirements of the approved course of study for the Pass degree.

(c) (i) Applicable to students who commenced their course at the University prior to 1 August 2008: Candidates who have resat examinations contributing to the final degree classification under paragraphs (4)(a)(iii) or (4)(a)(iv) above, may be considered for the award of an Honours degree but in the calculation of the final degree classification Boards of Examiners may only use the credit gained from the first attempt at the examinations. If the candidate is being considered for the award of a Pass degree, the Board of Examiners may use the credit gained from the second attempt at the examinations.

(ii) Applicable to students who commenced their course at the University on or after 1 August 2008: Candidates who have resat examinations contributing to the final degree classification under paragraphs (4)(a)(iii) or (4)(a)(iv) above, may be considered for the award of an Honours degree or a Pass Degree. Where a module which contributes to the degree classification has been failed but passed on resit, the pass mark (40%) will be used in the calculation of the degree class or the award of a Pass degree.

(d) Candidates who are not awarded a degree at the conclusion of the final year may take further tests as directed by the Board of Examiners in a final attempt the following Summer, without residence at the University, to qualify for a Pass degree, except that candidates shall not be permitted to resit examinations which have already been resat.

(8) Boards of Examiners may recommend the award of Aegrotat passes or degrees under the conditions laid down in the Regulations Governing the Procedure to be Adopted in the Event of Absence for Medical Reasons from a University Examination.

(9) (a) A candidate who is required by a Board of Examiners to withdraw from his/her course of study under either paragraph (3)(b)(iii) or (4)(c)(ii) above, has the right to make representations, normally in writing, within ten days of the publication of the examination results, to the Appeals Committee of the Board of the Faculty.

(b) The Appeals Committee will consider the appeal of a candidate against a decision made by the Board of Examiners requiring him/her to withdraw under either paragraph (3)(b)(iii) or (4)(c)(ii) above, where a candidate is in possession of evidence which was not available to the Board of Examiners when their decision was reached and can provide good reasons for not having made the Board of Examiners aware of this evidence. An appeal will not be considered in cases where both the Chair of the Board of Examiners and the Chair of the Appeals Committee consider that no such relevant evidence has been adduced by the candidate concerned.

(c) The Appeals Committee shall consist of not fewer than three members appointed by the Chair of the Board of the appropriate Faculty from a panel appointed by the Senate on the recommendation of the Board of the appropriate Faculty. No teacher of any course studied by the appellant shall be a member of the Appeals Committee. The Appeals Committee shall not include any member of the appellant’s department. The dates of the meetings of the Appeals Committees, together with the dates by which appellants must submit their appeals to the Secretary of the appropriate Faculty Board, shall be published by the University. Appellants will receive no less than 10 days formal notice of the meeting. The Chair of the appropriate Board of Examiners, or his/her authorised deputy, and the candidate’s Personal Tutor shall be in attendance when an appeal is being considered. If the appellant’s Personal Tutor is unable to be present, then a written statement from the Personal Tutor must be available at the hearing of the appeal. If the appellant’s Tutor is not in attendance, a representative from the appellant’s department(s) must be available when the appeal is being considered to advise the committee on departmental procedure and other relevant matters in the course of the hearing. A written statement shall be obtained from the Head of the appellant’s department who shall consult the teachers on the courses which were resat at the reset examination; written statements from the teachers may also be requested at the discretion of the Chair of the Appeals Committee. The appellant may, if he/she chooses, appear in person before the Appeals Committee and may invite any one other person to attend the hearing. The name and status of any person accompanying the student must be notified to the Chair of the Committee in advance of the meeting.

(d) The decision of the Appeals Committee is final.

(10) Permission for students to transfer from one degree course to another may be given only by the Academic Registrar on the recommendation of the Head(s) of Department(s) of the course on which the student is enrolled and to which the student is transferring. Transfer will not normally be permitted to take place between the beginning of the third week of the Spring term and the end of the Summer term. Heads of Departments may recommend that a student transfer degree course during this period where the transfer is to take place at the start of the next academic session.

8.2 Regulations for the Part-Time Degrees of BA and LLB

(1) All candidates for the part-time degrees of BA and LLB will be admitted to an Honours programme. Candidates who do not achieve an Honours degree will be eligible for the award of a Pass Degree if they have successfully completed six courses at Honours level or for the award of a Diploma if they have successfully completed four courses at Honours level or for the award of a Certificate if they have successfully completed four courses at Level 1. Candidates may opt to be considered for the award of a Pass Degree following completion of six courses at Honours level; a candidate awarded a Pass Degree on this basis shall not subsequently be permitted to take further Honours level courses in order to be considered for an Honours degree. A candidate awarded a Pass degree will have met the requirements of the approved course of study for the Pass degree.

(2) (a) Candidates for the degree must have followed an approved programme of part-time study in the University, extending normally over not fewer than four and not more than ten academic years for the BA, and over normally not more than six academic years for the LLB.

(b) Candidates may sit no more than four Level 1 courses and no more than eight Honours Level courses, and to be eligible for an Honours classification candidates must have been examined in eight courses at Honours Level.

(3) Candidates with Fewer than Four Level 1 Courses

(a) In the Summer term, Boards of Examiners will consider the progress of candidates with fewer than four Level 1 courses completed on the basis of such tests as may be approved by the Senate, together with candidates’ work in that year, and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to further courses at Level 1; or

(ii) be permitted to take further tests, as specified by the Board of Examiners, in the Summer vacation.

(b) Boards of Examiners will consider the results of the tests held in the Summer vacation together with candidates’ work in the first and in previous tests and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to further courses at Level 1; or

(ii) be recommended to withdraw from their programme of study; or

(iii) exceptionally, be permitted to take further tests, as specified by the Board of Examiners, in a final attempt the following year.

(c) Candidates in (b)(ii) above may, if they wish, take further tests in the following year as specified by the Board of Examiners.

(d) Boards of Examiners will consider the results of tests taken under (b)(iii) or (c) above, together with candidates’ work in previous tests and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to further courses at Level 1; or

(ii) be required to withdraw from their programme of study.

(4) Candidates with Four Level 1 Courses

(a) In the Summer term in which candidates have completed their fourth Level 1 course, Boards of Examiners will consider the progress of candidates during that year on the basis of such tests as may be approved by the Senate, together with candidates’ work in that and previous years, and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to Honours Level; or

(ii) be permitted to take further tests, as specified by the Board of Examiners, in the Summer vacation; or

(iii) be recommended to withdraw from their programme of study.

(b) Candidates in (a)(iii) above may, if they wish, take further tests in the Summer vacation as specified by the Board of Examiners.

(c) Boards of Examiners will consider the results of tests held in the Summer vacation together with candidates’ work in the first and in previous tests and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to Honours Level; or

(ii) be required to withdraw from their programme of study; or

(iii) exceptionally, be permitted to take further tests, as specified by the Board of Examiners, in a final attempt the following year.

(d) Boards of Examiners will consider the results of tests taken under (c)(iii) above, together with candidates’ work in previous tests and candidates willeither:

(i) be permitted to proceed to Honours Level; or

(ii) be required to withdraw from their programme of study.

(5) Honours Level Candidates

(a) At Honours Level, Boards of Examiners will each year consider the progress of candidates during that year on the basis of such tests as may be approved by the Senate, together with candidates’ work in that year and candidates will either:

(i) be permitted to proceed to further courses at Honours Level; or

(ii) be permitted to proceed to further courses at Honours Level notwithstanding a fail mark in a particular course; or

(iii) be required to take further tests in the Summer vacation.

(b) Boards of Examiners will consider the results of tests held in the Summer vacation together with candidates’ work in the first test and candidates willeither:

(i) be permitted to proceed to further courses at Honours Level; or

(ii) be required to withdraw from their programme of study.

(6) In determining the category and class of degree to be awarded, Boards of Examiners shall take into account the quality of candidates’ work throughout the degree programme.

(a) The degree with Honours will be awarded in three classes, the second class being in two divisions.

(b) The Pass degree is an unclassified degree.

(c) Candidates who are not awarded a degree at the conclusion of their final year may take further tests as directed by the Board of Examiners in a final attempt the following Summer, without residence at the University, to qualify for a Pass degree only, except that candidates shall not be permitted to resit examinations which have already been resat, subject to the candidate having met the requirements of the approved course of study for the Pass degree.

(7) Boards of Examiners may recommend the award of Aegrotat passes or degrees under the conditions laid down in the Regulations Governing the Procedure to be Adopted in the Event of Absence for Medical Reasons from a University Examination.

(8) (a) A candidate who is required by a Board of Examiners to withdraw from his/her programme of study under either paragraph (3)(d)(ii), (4)(c)(ii), (4)(d)(ii), or (5)(b)(ii) has the right to make representations, normally in writing, within ten days of the publication of the examination results, to the Appeals Committee of the Board of the appropriate Faculty.

(b) The Appeals Committee will consider the appeal of a candidate against a decision made by the Board of Examiners, requiring him/her to withdraw under either paragraph (3)(d)(ii), (4)(c)(ii), (4)(d)(ii), or (5)(b)(ii) where a candidate is in possession of evidence which was not available to the Board of Examiners when their decision was reached and can provide good reasons for not having made the Board of Examiners aware of this evidence. An appeal will not be considered in cases where both the Chair of the Board of Examiners and the Chair of the Appeals Committee consider that no such relevant evidence has been adduced by the candidate concerned.

(c) The Appeals Committee shall consist of not fewer than three members appointed by the Chair of the Board of the appropriate Faculty from a panel appointed by the Senate on the recommendation of the Board of the appropriate Faculty. No teacher of any course studied by the appellant shall be a member of the Appeals Committee. The Appeals Committee shall not include any member of the appellant’s department. The dates of the meetings of the Appeals Committees, together with the dates by which appellants must submit their appeals to the Secretary of the appropriate Faculty Board, shall be published by the University. Appellants will receive no less than 10 days formal notice of the meeting. The Chair of the appropriate Board of Examiners, or his/her authorised deputy, and the candidate’s Personal Tutor shall be in attendance when an appeal is being considered. If the appellant’s Personal Tutor is unable to be present, then a written statement from the Personal Tutor must be available at the hearing of the appeal. If the appellant’s Tutor is not in attendance, a representative from the appellant’s department(s) must be available when the appeal is being considered to advise the committee on departmental procedure and other relevant matters in the course of the hearing. A written statement shall be obtained from the Head of the appellant’s department who shall consult the teachers on the courses which were failed at the resit examination; written statements from the teachers may also be requested at the discretion of the Chair of the Appeals Committee. The appellant may, if he/she chooses, appear in person before the Appeals Committee and may invite any one other person to attend the hearing. The name and status of any person accompanying the student must be notified to the Chair of the Committee in advance of the meeting.

(d) The decision of the Appeals Committee is final.

(9) Candidates will be permitted at the end of Level 1 to transfer to another part-time degree programme by the Academic Registrar upon a recommendation made by the Director of the Centre for Lifelong Learning provided that the student has successfully completed the appropriate modules. Candidates at Levels 2 and above may be permitted by the Academic Registrar on the recommendation of the Director of the Centre for Lifelong Learning to transfer to another part-time degree programme. Transfer will not normally be permitted to take place between the beginning of the third week of the Spring term and the end of the Summer term. The Director of the Centre for Lifelong Learning may recommend that a student transfer degree course during this period where that transfer is to take place at the start of the next academic session.


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Regulation 12 Absence for Medical Reasons from a University Examination

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/absence/

(as specified under Ordinance 13)

Definitions:

In these regulations ‘examination’ means any test contributing to examination credit. In the case of assessed work, failure to submit shall be held to constitute absence from the examination; in addition ‘medical reasons’ may include emotional distress such as that occasioned by recent death or serious illness of a member of a candidate’s immediate family, or another individual who has a close personal relationship with the candidate.

(1) (a) Any candidate who is prevented for medical reasons from attending an examination or any part of an examination should submit to the Registrar, or in the case of the MBChB the MB ChB Examinations Officer, not later than three days following the last day of his/her University Examination (unless there are specific circumstances which warrant an extension of this period) a medical certificate showing his/her inability to take or complete the examination at the prescribed time.

(b) The Registrar shall inform the Chair of the appropriate Board of Examiners of any report submitted under (1)(a) above. In the case of the MBChB the Board of Examiners will be informed by the Chair of the Academic Progress Group or the MB ChB Examinations Officer.

(c) A Board of Examiners considering candidates taking examinations as a first attempt at meetings following Summer vacation examinations, may take any of the decisions available to them at meetings held in the Summer term to consider students sitting for the first time, except that all reference to ‘further tests in the Summer vacation’ shall be replaced by ‘further tests without residence the following Summer’ or for the MB ChB by 'further tests with residence the following summer'.

(d) Where a candidate is absent from only part of a particular examination, the Board of Examiners may, upon receipt of adequate medical certification, deem the whole of that particular examination to have been missed.

(2) First Year Examinations

(a) Any candidate who is absent for medical reasons from the whole or part of the examinations considered by the First Year Board of Examiners in the Summer term will be required to take the appropriate tests again in the Summer vacation.

(b) With the exception of candidates for the MB ChB where a candidate is absent for medical reasons from the whole of the examinations considered by the First Year Board of Examiners in the Summer term, and the whole of the examinations held in the Summer vacation, the Board of Examiners shall recommend either:

(i) an aegrotat pass (subject to the conditions laid down in (5) below); or decide:

(ii) that the candidate be required to take the examination the following summer without residence.

(c) Where a candidate for the MB ChB is absent for medical reasons from the whole of the examinations considered by the First Year Board of Examiners in the Summer term, and the whole of the examinations held in the Summer vacation, the Board of Examiners shall recommend that the candidate be required to take the examination the following summer with residence.

(d) Where a candidate who has attended the Summer term examinations and has been required to take resit examinations in the vacation is absent for medical reasons from the whole or part of the examinations considered by the First Year Board of Examiners in the Summer vacation the First Year Board of Examiners may take any of the decisions open to it under the Regulations governing first degrees.

(3) Second and Third Year Examinations which are not Final Year Examinations

(a) With the exception of candidates for the MB ChB where a candidate is absent for medical reasons from the whole or part of the examination taken in the second year, or in the third year of a four year degree course, the Board of Examiners shall either:

(i) require that the candidate take appropriate tests during the Summer vacation; or

(ii) where the candidate will not be medically fit to take the examination during the Summer vacation, require that the candidate take appropriate tests the following Summer, without residence; or

(iii) take any of the decisions open to it under the Regulations governing first degrees, provided that the examinations missed in the year in question and in previous years do not cumulatively contribute more than 30 per cent of the credit towards the final qualification.

(b) With the exception of candidates for the MB ChB, where a candidate who is absent from the whole or part of the examination taken in the second year, or in the third year of a four year degree course, is required under paragraph (3)(a) above to take further tests during the Summer vacation and where the candidate is absent for medical reasons from the whole or part of the examination held in the Summer vacation, the Board of Examiners shalleither:

(i) recommend an aegrotat pass (subject to the conditions laid down in (5) below); or

(ii) require that the candidate take appropriate tests the following Summer, without residence; or

(iii) take any of the decisions open to it under the Regulations governing first degrees, provided that the examinations missed in the year in question or in previous years do not cumulatively contribute more than 30 per cent of the credit towards the final qualification.

(c) Where a candidate for the MB ChB is absent for medical reasons from the whole or part of the examination taken in the second year, or in the third year, the Board of Examiners shall either:

(i) require that the candidate take appropriate tests in the winter vacation of the second year or June of the third year; or

(ii) where the candidate will not be medically fit to take the examination during the times specified in (c)(i) above which will require the candidate to repeat the appropriate year of study with residence.

(4) Final Year Examinations

(a) With the exception of candidates for the MB ChB where a candidate is absent for medical reasons from any part of the final year examinations where the examinations missed in the final year and in previous years cumulatively contribute more than 30 per cent of the credit towards the final qualification, the candidate will be eligible for consideration for the award of an Aegrotat qualification.

(b) Where a candidate is absent for medical reasons from any part of the final year examinations where the examinations missed in the final year and in previous years do not cumulatively contribute more than 30 per cent of the credit towards the final degree, and would have satisfied the conditions for the award of an Aegrotat degree laid down in (5) below, the candidate will be eligible for consideration for the award of a classified Honours degree.

(c) Where a candidate is absent for medical reasons from any part of the final year examinations and the Board of Examiners does not wish to make a recommendation under paragraphs (a) or (b) above, it may decide that the candidate should be permitted a further attempt the following Summer term, as under paragraph 5(c) below.

(d) Candidates for the MB ChB degree who are absent for medical reasons from any part of the final year examinations normally will be permitted to make a further attempt during the following academic year with residence.

(5) Conditions Relating to the Granting of an Aegrotat Pass or the Award of an Aegrotat Degree or BSc, MEng

(a) Where the award of an Aegrotat pass or Aegrotat qualification is under consideration the medical certificate will be considered by the Aegrotat Committee of the Senate, together with a record of the student’s work, assessments provided by his/her tutors, and if he/she has taken part of the examination, by the examiners. The Aegrotat Committee must be satisfied that these reports show beyond reasonable doubt that the candidate would have passed the examinations, and may then recommend to the Senate the award of an Aegrotat pass or an Aegrotat degree.

(b) The Aegrotat qualification may be awarded either as an unclassified Honours qualification or as a Pass degree except that there will be no Pass Aegrotat classification for undergraduate Master’s degrees. In the case of a candidate who has followed a Pass degree course in his/her final year the Aegrotat degree may be awarded only as an Aegrotat (Pass) degree.

(c) Any candidate who qualifies for the award of an Aegrotat pass or qualification may instead elect to take the final examination in the following year, with or without residence, without prejudice to the candidate’s standing for an Honours classification. The candidate who elects to take the examination with residence will take the whole of the examinations, including the submission of new assessed work appropriate to the year in question. The candidate who elects to take the examination without residence will take only those examinations from which he/she was absent, including the submission of such pieces of assessed work as he/she failed to submit for medical reasons.


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First Year Board of Examiners – Quick Guide

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/examinations/fyboe/guide/

After the examination period in the Summer Term and (as necessary) after the resit examinations in September, the performance of each first-year student within each Faculty are considered by a body called the First -Year Board of Examiners. Performance is judged objectively based on the marks achieved via assessed pieces of work or tests as defined by the Senate. This is to ensure that all students entering their second year of study, where they will undertake Honours level work, have performed consistently.


There are separate First-Year Boards of Examiners for the Faculties of Arts, Social Sciences and Science. The membership is defined in Regulation 9.1 governing the constitution of Boards of Examiners for first degrees (undergraduate courses) and usually consists of the the Chair of the Faculty Undergraduate Studies Committee and representatives from the departments in the Faculty. Specific details for the Summer and September processes are given below.

In the Summer Term meeting, the Board can take the following decisions based on the performance of the student, taking into account where appropriate anyextenuating circumstances notified in advance:

  • Proceed to the next year of study on the Honours course on which they are registered

  • Resolve that a student resits certain elements of the first-year programme in September

  • Resolve that a student take one or more elements of the programme in September as a first attempt

  • Recommend that the student withdraw from the course but allow the student to resit certain elements if s/he wishes

  • Resolve that a student be required to withdraw from his/her course due to failure in required laboratory tests (Faculty of Science ONLY) - students may have a right to appeal in this case - see the Exams Office Appeals page for details

Students will receive notification of the decision formally from the University in two ways: firstly, lists of students who have passed will be posted in the University House Atrium and in departments once Boards have met. Secondly, the University will write (by email to University email addresses) to students to confirm the decision and, in cases where students are required to take further examinations, to set out the arrangements for these.
IT IS THEREFORE VITAL THAT STUDENT CONTACT DETAILS FOR THE SUMMER VACATION ARE UP TO DATE - this can be done via start.warwick.

For students who take further examinations either as a second or first attempt in September, the Board can take the following decisions based on the performance of the student, again taking into account where appropriate any mitigating circumstancesnotified in advance:

Decisions available following a second attempt in September:

  • Proceed to the next year of study on the Honours course on which the student is registered (students may proceed to the next year of study on a Pass degree on departmental recommendation; there may be the possibility of reinstatement to Honours if the student performs well in the next academic year)

  • Require that the student withdraw from his/her course - students may have right to appeal in this case - see the Exams Office Appeals page for details

Decisions available following a first attempt in September:

  • Proceed to the next year of study on the Honours course on which they are registered (students may proceed to the next year of study on a Pass degree on departmental recommendation; there may be the possibility of reinstatement to Honours if the student performs well in the next academic year)

  • Resolve that a student resits one or more elements of their first - year programme in the following May/June - this would be without residence on campus.

Exceptionally the Board may:

  • Permit a student to resit certain elements of their first-year programme in May/June of the following academic year in a final attempt - this would be without residence on campus during the following academic year

The University will write to students (see above) to confirm the decision and, in cases where students are required to take further examinations in the following academic year, to set out the requirements for these.
IT IS THEREFORE VITAL THAT STUDENT CONTACT DETAILS FOR THE SUMMER VACATION ARE UP TO DATE - this can be done via start.warwick