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Conference Speakers

Maria Ines Aliverti is a Professor in the History of Art Department of the University of Pisa. She was a member of the steering committee of the European Science Foundation’s Network on Theatre Iconography, 1987-2000. Her publications include: Jacques Copeau (Bari: Laterza, 1997), Poesia fuggitiva sugli attori nell’età di Voltaire (Roma: Bulzoni, 1993), and La naissance de l’acteur moderne. L’acteur et son portrait au XVIIIe siècle (Paris: Gallimard, 1998). She was both editor of, and contributor to, the Genoa cluster of Festival Books in J. R. Mulryne, Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly and Margaret Shewring (gen. eds), Europa Triumphans: Court and Civic Festivals in Early Modern Europe (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2004); Una scena di città attribuita a Sebastiano Serlio: Breve saggio di iconologia teatrale (Pisa, ETS, 2008); she is currently editing Il viaggio in Italia di Margherita d’Austria regina di Spagna (1598-1599). Ingressi, feste e cerimonie, Pisa, Plus, forthcoming 2010.
Conference paper title:
‘Water Policy and Water Festival: the case of Pisa under Ferdinand de’ Medici (1588-1609).’
 
 
Sydney Anglo is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Wales (Swansea) and a Fellow of the British Academy. He was Chairman of the Society for Renaissance Studies from 1986 to 1989. His publications include: Spectacle, Pageantry, and Early Tudor Policy (Oxford: Warburg Studies, 1969: new edition, 1997), The Martial Arts of the Renaissance (New Haven and London: Yale, 2000), Machiavelli – the First Century (2005) and Images of Tudor Kingship (London: B. A. Seaby, 1992).
Conference paper title:
The Thames en fête
 
 
Marie-Claude Canova-Green is Reader in French at Goldsmith’s College, University of London. Her publications include: ‘Les ‘Feste Teatrali’ de Mantoue et de Florence en 1608 et leurs métamorphoses sur la scène Française’, in J. R. Mulryne and Margaret Shewring, eds, Italian Renaissance Festivals and their European Influence (Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 1992), La Politique-spectacle au grand siècle (Biblio 17, 1993), Benserade:Ballets pour Louis XIV (SLC/Klinckiesck, 1997), Racine et l’Histoire, ed (Biblio 17/Gunter Narr, 2004) and ‘La Rochelle and the Defeat of Protestantism’ in J. R. Mulryne, Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly and Margaret Shewring (gen. eds), Europa Triumphans: Court and Civic Festivals in Early Modern Europe, 2 vols (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2004).
Conference paper title:
History or Fantasy: mock sea-battles and the defence of Christendom
 
 
Monique Chatenet is Conservateur en chef du Patrimoine at the Centre André Chastel (CNRS, Paris). She specialises in the history of French Renaissance architecture and the relationship between architecture and court life. In addition to numerous articles, her publications include Le Château de Madrid au bois de Boulogne (1987), Chambord (2001), La cour de France au XVIe siècle. Vie sociale et architecture (2002), ‘Etiquette and Architecture at the Court of the Last Valois’ in J. R. Mulryne and Elizabeth Goldring, eds, Court Festivals of the European Renaissance (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2002), Maulnes. Archéologie d’un château de la Renaissance (2004), Maisons des Champs dans L’Europe de la Renaissance (2006), Chasses princières dans l’Europe de la Renaissance (2007).
Conference paper title:
Parisian Water Festivals from François I to Henri III
 
 
Richard Cooper is Professor of French and Vice-Principal of Brasenose College, University of Oxford. His publications include: Marguerite de Navarre, Chrétiens et mondains, poèmes épars, vol. 8 of Œuvres completes de Marguerite de Navarre (Paris: Librairie H. Champion, 2007), with G. Demerson, Jean du Bellay, Peomata (Paris: Société des Textes Français Modernes, 2007), Litteræ in tempore belli: Etudes sur les relations littéraires italo-françaises pendant les guerres d’Italie (Geneva: Libraire Droz, 1997) and Maurice Scève, The Entry of Henri II into Lyon, September 1548, text with an introduction and notes (Tempe Arizona: Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1997).
Conference paper title:
French Renaissance Waterborne Festivals
 
 
H. Neville Davies formerly lecturer in English Literature at the University of Birmingham, has also taught at the Universities of Liverpool, Oslo and Bangor, and through two decades served as co-convenor of the British Milton Seminar. His publications range across topics from the 16th to the 20th centuries. Among those relevant to the present conference are ‘Dryden’s Rahmenerzählung: The Form of An Essay of Dramatick Poesie’, in M-S Røstvig, ed., Fair Forms: Essays in English Literature from Spenser to Jane Austen (Camnridge: Brewer, 1975), pp. 119-46, 219-22; ‘Jacobean Antony and Cleopatra’, Shakespeare Studies 17 (1985), 123-58; ‘The Limitation of Festival: Christian IV’s State Visit to England in 1606’, in J. R. Mulryne and Margaret Shewring, eds, Italian Renaissance Festivals and their European Influence (Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press, 1992), pp. 311-35 and ‘“To Sing and Revel in these Woods”: Purcell’s The Fairy-Queen and The Honourable Entertainment at Elvetham’, Renaissance Journal, I. vi (June 2002), 3-14.
Conference paper title:
The Entertainment for Queen Elizabeth I at Elvetham in 1591
 
 
Iain Fenlon is Professor of Historical Musicology in the Faculty of Music and a Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge. His principal area of research is music from 1450-1650, particularly in Italy. Most of his writings, some of which are gathered together in Music and Culture in Late Renaissance Italy (Oxford, 2000), explore how the history of music is related to the history of society. His most recent book is The Ceremonial City: History, Memory and Myth in Renaissance Venice (New Haven and London: Yale, 2007).
Conference paper title: 
Imperial Metaphors: Venice and the Adriatic Celebrated
 
 
Robert Knecht is Emeritus Professor of History, University of Birmingham, a former chairman of the Society of Renaissance Studies and of the Society of French History. His publications include: Francis I (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982), Renaissance Warrior and Patron: the reign of Francis I, revised, expanded and illustrated (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), Catherine de’ Medici (London and New York: Longman, 1998), The Rise and Fall of Renaissance France: 1483-1610 (second edition: Malden MA and Oxford: Blackwell, 2001), The French Religious Wars 1562-1598 (London: Longman, 1989; second edition, 1996), The Valois Kings of France, 1328 – 1589 (London and New York: Hambledon and London, 2004) and The French Renaissance Court (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2008).
Conference paper title:
The Water Festivals of Charles IX and of Henri III, kings of France
 
 
Iain McClure completed his PhD thesis, on Orientalism in John Milton, under the supervision of Thomas Healy at the University of London in 2008. He has taught at both Birkbeck and King’s College London. He is currently developing his thesis into a monograph, as well as pursuing a new research project on Renaissance neuroscience and the Early Modern imagination. He is a member of the English Department at Epsom College, Surrey.
Conference paper title:
Enacting the pan-Protestant Crusade in Early Modern English pageantry
 
 
Margaret M. McGowan is Research Professor of French, University of Sussex and a Fellow of the British Academy. Her publications include: L’Art du Ballet de Cour en France, 1581-1643 (Paris: Editions du Centre national de la recherché scientifiques, 1963), Balthazar de Beaujoyeulx: Balet comique de la royne, 1581, a facsimile edition (Binghamton, NY: Center of Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, 1982), The Vision of Rome in Late Renaissance France (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2000) and Dance in the Renaissance: European Fashion, French Obsession (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2008).
Conference paper title:
Lyons: a centre for Renaissance water festivals
 
 
Ronnie Mulryne is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Warwick, and former Director of the Centre for the Study of the Renaissance and the AHRB/C Centre for the Study of Renaissance Elites and Court Cultures. He has most recently published edited collections of essays including Court Festivals of the European Renaissance: Art, Politics and Performance ed. J.R.Mulryne and Elizabeth Goldring (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2002) and was joint general editor of Europa Triumphans: Court and Civic Festivals in Early Modern Europe ed. J.R. Mulryne, Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly and Margaret Shewring (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2 vols, 2004; electronic edition, 2009). He was Director, with Margaret Shewring, of the Warwick/ British Library project to digitise 253 Renaissance and Early Modern Festival books (2006; accessible at bl.uk/ Treasures in Full).
Conference paper title:
Naumachia in Florence, 1589
 
 
Eric Nicholson has been a member of the Faculty of the Syracuse University in Florence since 1998. He holds a BA from the University of California, Berkeley, an MA from the Centre of the Study of the Renaisance, University of Warwick, and a PhD from Yale University. His publications and translations include: Sin and Fear: the emergence of a western guilt culture (translator, St. Martin’s Press, 1990), articles in A History of Women in the West (Harvard University Press, 1993), Place and Displacement in the Renaissance (SUNY, 1995), and Transnational Exchange in Early Modern Theater (co-editor with Robert Henke, Ashgate, 2008).
Conference paper title:
Translating the Theatrical Virtuosa from Venice to London
 
 
Stephen Orgel is Jackson Eli Professor of Humanities and Professor of English at Stanford University. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has published widely on political and historical aspects of Renaissance literature, theatre, art history and the history of the book. His publications include: The Authentic Shakespeare (Routledge, 2002), Imagining Shakespeare (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2003), The Illusion of Power (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1975), Inigo Jones: the Theatre of the Stuart Court, with Roy Strong (London and Berkeley: 1973) and The Jonsonian Masque (Cambridge, Mass.: 1965).
Conference paper title:
Real Places in Imaginary Spaces
 
 
Nadine Pederson is Assistant Professor and Graduate Co-ordinator in the Theatre Arts Department of Central Washington University. Her research focuses on law and performance in 16th century France. She currently has two major publications in progress: a monograph, The Paris Stage, 1500 – 1560: Legal Reform and Urban Stability; and an annotated edition, Documents Relating to the Early Office of Master of the Revels in France.
Conference paper title:
 A view from the bridge: Parisian Audiences and the Seine, 1500-1560
 
 
David Sánchez-Cano holds an MA and a doctorate (thesis topic ‘Royal Entries in Madrid, 1560-1690’) from the Technical University, Berlin and a B.Mus from Roosevelt University, Chicago. Since 1990 he has been a freelance translator in humanities, arts and business, has published essays and studies in collections and journals in Spanish, German and English. He contributed an essay on Spanish Festivals in the Renaissance to the Festival Books Digitisation Project (co-directed by J. R. Mulryne and Margaret Shewring; located at bl.uk/Treasures in Full) and is completing a book entitled Festivals in Spain from 1541 to 1760 for Ashgate Publishing.
Conference paper title:
The 1637 Naumaquia at the Buen Retiro in Madrid
 
 
Julie Sanders is a Professor of English Literature and Drama at the University of Nottingham. Her research focuses on the Early Modern period, with particular interest in drama. She is currently concentrating on the cultural geography of Caroline literature. Her publications include: an edition of Ben Jonson’s The New Inn in The Complete Works of Ben Jonson (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009), ‘The Hague Courts of Elizabeth of Bohemia and Mary Stuart’, with A. L. Hughes, in Early Modern Literary Studies, 15 (2007), Shakespeare and Music: afterlives and borrowings (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2007), The 1630s: interdisciplinary Essays on Culture and Politics in the Caroline Era (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006) and an edition of James Shirley’s The Bird in the Cage, in H. Chalmers, J. Sanders and S. Tomlinson, eds, Three Seventeenth-Century Plays on Women and Performance, Revels Companion Library (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006).
Conference paper title:
Liquid Landscapes: Drama on the Thames in Caroline London
 
 
Roger Savage taught for thirty-five years at the University of Edinburgh, where he staged productions of early opera and other forms of music theatre. He presented documentary programmes for BBC Radio 3 and is author of the entries on ‘Incidental Music’ and ‘Opera production to 1860’ for the second edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (2000). His published essays include pieces on staging at court in the 1620s, Purcell’s theatrical connections, Baroque stage presentations of the Native Americans and Metastasio’s ideas on opera production. He contributed a chapter entitled ‘Checklist for Philostrate’ to J. R. Mulryne and Elizabeth Goldring, eds, Court Festivals of the European Renaissance (Basingstoke and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2002) and an introduction on the staging of European Festivals to J. R. Mulryne, Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly and Margaret Shewring (gen. eds), Europa Triumphans: Court and Civic Festivals of the European Renaissance, 2 vols (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2004).
Conference paper title:
Sea Spectacles on Dry Land, 1589 – 1691
 
 
Margaret Shewring is Associate Professor in the School of Theatre, Performance and Cultural Policy Studies, University of Warwick. Her publications include: a Critical Edition of Sir Robert Howard’s The Great Favourite; or, the Duke of Lerma (New York: Garland, 1988) and Shakespeare’s ‘Richard II’ in Peformance (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1996)   She was co-editor, with J. R. Mulryne, of Italian Renaissance Festivals and their European Influence (Lampeter: Edwin Mellen, 1992), Theatre and Government Under the Early Stuarts (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993; reprinting 2009), Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999) and Shakespeare’s Globe Rebuilt (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997; reprinted 2008). She was joint general editor, with J. R. Mulryne and Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly, of Europa Triumphans: Court and Civic Festivals in Early Modern Europe, 2 vols (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2004; electronic edition, 2009) and Co-Director, with Ronnie Mulryne, of the Warwick/British Library project to digitise 253 Renaissance and Early Modern Festival Books (2006; accessible at bl.uk/Treasures in Full).
Conference paper title:
Waterborne Pageants and Festivities in the Renaissance: an introduction and overview
 
 
Mara Wade is a Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has published over forty scholarly articles and is the principal investigator for the research group ‘Digital Emblematica’ at the University of Illinois. She edited and introduced the section on Scandinavian Festival Books in Europa Triumphans: Court and Civic Festivals in Early Modern Europe, 2 vols, J. R. Mulryne, Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly and Margaret Shewring, gen. eds (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2004) and is currently writing a monograph entitled Splendid Ceremonies: the Great Spectacles of the Early Modern Period in Electoral Saxony and Denmark, 1548 – 1709.
Conference paper title:
German mock battles and fireworks held on the water from 1550-1709
 
 
Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly is Professor of German Literature at Oxford University and Fellow and Tutor of Exeter College, Oxford. Her publications include: Triumphall Shews: Tournaments at German-Speaking Courts in their European Context, 1560 – 1730 (Gebr. Mann Verlag, 1992), Festivals and Ceremonies: A Bibliography of Works relating to Court, Civic and Religious Festivals in Europe, 1500 – 1800, with Anne Simonson (2000), Spectaculum Europeum: Theatre and Spactacle in Europe, 1580 – 1750, with Pierre Béhar (Harrassowitz, 1999) and Court Culture in Dresden from Renaissance to Baroque (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002). She was general editor, with J. R. Mulryne and Margaret Shewring, of Europa Triumphans: Court and Civic Festivals in Early Modern Europe, 2 vols (Aldershot and Burlington VT: Ashgate, 2004; electronic edition, 2009). Her most recent book, scheduled to appear in 2010, is Beauty or Beast? The Woman Warrior in the German Imagination (Oxford University Press).
Conference paper title:
The waterborne pageants of Ernst August, Duke of Braunschweig-Lüneburg (1674-1728), in late 17th century Venice