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Patient and Public Involvement

CLAHRC

Funder: NIHR

Description: NIHR CLAHRC West Midlands is a five-year programme funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) and matched funds provided by local health and social services. The programme builds on the successful CLAHRC for Birmingham & Black Country pilot with a mission to create lasting and effective partnerships across health and social care organisations, universities (Birmingham, Keele and Warwick) to improve the services we can deliver for patient benefit.

Director: Richard Lilford

Start date: 1 January 2014 End date 31 December 2018

Collaborators: Birmingham University, Keele University, service providers and local authorities.

Description: Our focus is on developing research which enables us to better understand the contribution PPI makes to CLAHRC.

SS is supervising the PPI research elements within the implementation theme, based at WBS.

PPI advisors study (Lead: Alison Hipwell)

A conceptual mapping of PPI in implementation (Lead: Lee Gunn)

Publications:

Staniszewska S, Gunn L, Hipwell A, Currie G et al (in prep). Patient and public involvement in implementation: Findings of a world café.

Staniszewska S, Mathews R, Denegri S (in prep). Going the extra mile: Developing a new vision for PPI in the National Institute of Health. Submission to BMJ.

Gunn L, Staniszewska S, Currie G (in prep_. A conceptual mapping of patient and public involvement in the implementation of evidence. (Submission to Social Science and medicine)

Tue 10 November 2015, 13:43

ACAP

Improving the Absorptive Capacity (ACAP) of Commissioning Networks for Critical Review of Evidence to Reduce Unplanned Elderly Care Admissions into Acute Hospitals

Funder: NIHR HSDR, £499,000. (5% SS time to RCN RI)

PI: Graeme Currie, WBS

Start date: 1.6.13. End date 31.5.16

Collaborators: Richard Lilford (Birm), Sabi Redwood (Birm), Tina Kiefer, Sophie Staniszewska.

Description: This study is exploring the ‘absorptive capacity’ of clinical commissioning networks. This term describes an organisation’s ‘ability to identify, assimilate, & exploit knowledge from the environment’

The objectives of this study are:

(i) To assess the development of critical review capacity, conceived as ACAP, of the new CCG led commissioning networks from inception through their early years;

(ii) To enhance the development of critical review capacity, conceived as ACAP, of the new CCG led commissioning networks;

(iii) To support acquisition & utilisation of patient experience knowledge to enhance critical review capacity, conceived as ACAP of commissioning networks;

(iv) To develop & validate a self-reflection ACAP tool for use by CCG led commissioning networks & other healthcare organisations to enhance their critical review capacity;

(v) To bridge the gap between potential & realised critical review capacity or ACAP of CCG led commissioning networks

Sophie Staniszewska is leading work package 3, ‘Using patient experience evidence to enhance critical review capacity of commissioning networks’. The ACAP PPI group has been established and has commented on the emerging data from the study. Their substantive input will be into the development of the psychometric tool to measure ACAP.

Publication:

Croft C, Currie G, Staniszewska S (in review). Encouraging innovative public involvement – the need for managerial distance. Submitted to Social Science and Medicine.

Tue 10 November 2015, 13:42

PERO (Public Engagement Research Online)

Funder: JISC

Start Date: March 2012 End Date: October 2012

PI: Eric Jensen, Sociology, University of Warwick

Collaborators: Becker S, Oswald A, Staniszewska S et al.

Description: This study is exploring the potential for public engagement in an online context. Sophie Staniszewska has been leading the comparison and analysis of online engagement data focusing on the work of Andrew Oswald on happiness.

Progress: The study is complete and final report has been submitted. The results of all the studies funded in this round will be drawn together by the National Collaborating Centre for Public Engagement.

Tue 10 November 2015, 13:40

Developing consensus on guidance for reporting patient and public involvement (GRIPP 2)

Funder: Internal funding

Start date: January 2013 End date: June 2014

PI: Sophie Staniszewska (Warwick)

Collaborators: Kate Seers (Warwick), Carole Mockford (Warwick), Jo Brett (Warwick), Rosemary Barber (Sheffield), Iveta Simera (Oxford), Doug Altman (Oxford), David Moher (Ottowa), Peter Littlejohns (Kings, formerly NICE), Victoria Thomas (NICE), Chris Morris (Exeter Medical School), Simon Denegri (INVOLVE).

Description: The reporting of patient and public involvement in health research needs significant enhancement. The GRIPP checklist developed by the RCN RI represents the first international attempt to enhance the quality of PPI reporting. This study will utilise the GRIPP checklist and develop GRIPP 2 by following the method and consensus process utilised by the EQUATOR Network, an international initiative that seeks to enhance the reliability and value of medical research by promoting transparent and accurate reporting of research studies. The aim of the GRIPP 2 checklist is to help researchers and service users improve the quality, content, detail, consistency, transparency, and completeness of their PPI reporting, thus

strengthening the PPI evidence base, and ultimately enabling a clearer understanding of what PPI works, for whom, why and in what circumstances.

Progress: The paper that underpins this work reporting the GRIPP checklist has been published. The study is complete including the Delphi and the consensus meeting. The final papers are being written.

Publications:

Staniszewska S, Brett J, Mockford C, Barber R (2011). The GRIPP checklist: Strengthening the quality and transparency of reporting for patient and public involvement in research. International Journal of Technology Assessment for Health Care, 27 (4):391-399.

Staniszewska S, Brett J, Seers K et al (2015). Developing guidance for reporting patient and public involvement in health research: A Delphi consensus study to develop GRIPP2-SF and GRIPP2-LF (Submission to BMJ)

Brett J, Staniszewska, Seers K et al (2015). Methods for developing guidance for reporting patient and public involvement in health research (Submission to BMJ)

Tue 10 November 2015, 13:37 | Tags: GRIPP2

Infection Disease Dynamic Modelling in Health Protection

Funder: DH Policy Programme

PI: Matt Keeling, Life Sciences, Warwick Medical School.

Dates: 1 Aug 2013 to 1 Aug 2018

Collaborators: Sophie Staniszewska, Graham Medley, Stavros Petrou, Martin Underwood,

Description: The primary aim of this proposal is to provide a programme of dynamic and health economic modelling that will underpin opinions and advice on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interventions against infectious diseases in the UK. The opinions and advice are intended for comparison with dynamic disease and health economic modelling undertaken by other groups, including Health Protection England. The precise infections and scenarios considered will be driven by DH policy teams through HPAT SS is providing input on patient and public involvement in this study.

Progress: The study has started and the project team are meeting regularly. SS has recruited a PPI panel who have met three times SS and SP are planning a paper to identify the potential for PPI to influence economic modelling which will provide the framework for the work of the group. SS presenting on PPI at the other DH funded unit who are replicating the modelling of the Warwick team

Wed 12 March 2014, 10:08

GRIPP2 (Reporting of Patient and Public Involvement in Research)

Funder: Internal

Start date: January 2011 End date: June 2013

PI: Sophie Staniszewska (Warwick)

Collaborators: Kate Seers (Warwick), Carole Mockford (Warwick), Jo Brett (Warwick), Rosemary Barber (Sheffield), Iveta Simera (Oxford), Doug Altman (Oxford), David Moher (Ottawa), Peter Littlejohns (NICE)

Descrption: The reporting of patient and public involvement in health research needs significant enhancement. The GRIPP checklist developed by the RCN RI represents the first international attempt to enhance the quality of PPI reporting. This study will utilise the GRIPP checklist and develop GRIPP 2 by following the method and consensus process utilised by the EQUATOR Network, an international initiative that seeks to enhance the reliability and value of medical research by promoting transparent and accurate reporting of research studies. The aim of the GRIPP 2 checklist will be to help researchers and service users improve the quality, content, detail, consistency, transparency, and completeness of their PPI reporting, thus strengthening the PPI evidence base, and ultimately enabling a clearer understanding of what PPI works, for whom, why and in what circumstances.

Progress: The paper that underpins this work reporting the GRIPP checklist has been published. Invitations to participate in the Delphi consensus survey (to gain consensus on what should and should not be included in the GRIPP checklist) sent to a cohort of individuals working in this area with 165 confirmed participants. The survey has been set up to run online, and has been tested.

The final consensus meeting is being arranged for last week in March 2014 at the RCN HQ, London

We are preparing the protocol paper. We plan to negotiate multiple publication of the final GRIPP 2 paper in key journals, as is usual practice for EQUATOR guidance.

Invitations and Information to contribute to a study to develop consensus-based guidance for the reporting of patient and public involvement (PPI) in helath and social care research can be found on this page.

GRIPP2 Invitations can be found here.

GRIPP2 Information Sheet can be found here.

GRIPP2 Invitation for Lay Members can be found here.

GRIPP2 Information Sheet for Lay Members can be found here.

Publication:

Staniszewska S, Brett J, Mockford C, Barber R (2011). The GRIPP checklist: Strengthening the quality and transparency of reporting for patient and public involvement in research. International Journal of Technology Assessment for Health Care, 27 (4):391-399.

Mon 28 October 2013, 13:53 | Tags: GRIPP2

NICE Scoping Study of Patient Experiences: Developing the Warwick Patient Experiences Framework (WaPEF)

Funder: NICE

Start date: November 2010. End date: March 2011.

PI: Sophie Staniszewska

Collaborators: Kate Seers (Warwick), Jo Brett (Warwick), Lee Gunn (Warwick) Julie Roberts (Warwick), Felicity Boardman (Warwick), Diane Clay (Warwick).

Description: The NICE Scoping Study included a focused thematic qualitative overview, utilising key aspects of systematic reviewing to develop the Warwick Patient Experiences Framework (WaPEF) to inform the development of the NICE Patient Experiences Guideline which will be utilised in the NHS Outcomes Framework. The aims were to:

• To identify generic themes and sub-themes of patient experience in three clinical areas: cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, all areas of significant disease burden.

• To use the themes and sub-themes identified in the three clinical areas to develop an overall generic patient experiences framework that has potential relevance for all patients.

Progress: This scoping study is now complete and has been used in the development of the NICE Patient Experiences Guidance which will become part of the NHS Outcomes Framework.

Fri 04 November 2011, 08:06 | Tags: NICE

RAPPORT Public involvement in research: a realist evaluation of approaches, process and outcomes

Funder: INVOLVE/Health Services Research Programme

Start date: September 2011. End date: September 2013

PI: Tricia Wilson

Collaborators: Kendall S (Hertforshire), Goodman C (Hertfordshire), Cowe M (Hertfordshire), Munday D (Hertfordshire), Peckham S (London School of Hygiene), Howe A (Norwich), Poland F (Norwich), Staniszewska S (Warwick).

Description: This project seeks to evaluate how different approaches to public involvement in research influences the identification of priorities, research conception, design, process, findings and knowledge transfer. To capture a range of research topics and methods and outcomes six exemplar areas will be investigated for evidence of public involvement in research (PIR); these are: diabetes, arthritis, cystic fibrosis, dementia, public health and learning disabilities. Analysis will focus on how different approaches to PIR and intensity of PIR impact on how research questions are framed, the research process, the interpretation of data and ultimately the dissemination and implementation of findings to clinicians, patient groups and commissioners.

Progress: The project has completed and papers are being planned. The final report has been submitted. SS leading on the paper focusing on the importance of relationships as the glue of successful PPI. The team are working on a paper focusing on evaluating public involvement in health research: normalisation Process Theory as programme theory within a realist evaluative framework.

Publications:

Mathie E, Wilson P, Poland F, McNeilly E, Howie A, Staniszewska S, Cowe M, Munday D et al (2014). Consumer Involvement in health research: a UK scoping and survey. International Journal of Consumer Studies. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 38 (1) 35-44

Wilson P, Mathie E, Keenan J, McNeilly E, Goodman C, Howe A, Poland F, Staniszewska S et al. ReseArch with Patient and Public invOlvement: a RealisT evaluation - the RAPPORT study. Health Serv Deliv Res 2015;3(38)

Staniszewska S, Keenan J, Wilson P et al (in prep). The role of relationships in successful PPI: Identifying key dimensions and contextual factors. Social Science and Medicine 

Fri 04 November 2011, 08:04 | Tags: RAPPORT

ECLIPS: Evaluating CLAHRCs Impacts and Process

Funder: National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery & Organisation Programme

Start date: January 2010. End date: July 2014.

PI: Jo Rycroft-Malone ( Bangor )

Collaborators: Ariss S, Burton C, Dopson S, Graham I, Harvey G, Martin G, McCormack B, Staniszewska s, Thompson C, Wilkinson J, Andrews G.

Description: This aim of this study is to determine the impact of CLAHRCs in relation to one of their key functions: 'implementing the findings from research in clinical practice' and thereby make a significant contribution to the evidence base about research implementation. The overarching evaluation question is implementation research through CLAHRCs - What works, for whom, why and in what circumstances? This will be addressed through objectives about implementation processes, mechanisms and impact, communities of practice and sustained interactions, contextual influences, and boundary objects. An integral part of the study will be the exploration of user involvement in the implementation of research within CLAHRCs.

Progress: The study has completed and the study report has been submitted. Warwick is leading on the user involvement strand, focusing on assessing the impact of user involvement in CLARCHs. Papers are in preparation.

Publications:

Rycroft-Malone, J., Wilkinson, J., Burton, CR., Harvey, G., McCormack, B., Graham, I. and Staniszewska, S. (2013) Collaborative action around implementation in Collaborations for leadership in Applied Health Research and care: towards a programme theory. Journal of Health Services Research & Policy 18(Suppl. 3):13-26

Rycroft-Malone J, Wilkinson JE, , Burton CR, Andrews G, Ariss S, Baker R, Dopson S,Graham I, Harvey G, Martin G, McCormack B Staniszewska S Thompson C (2011). Implementing health research through academic and clinical partnerships: a realistic evaluation of the Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC). Implementation Science 2011, 6:74 doi:10.1186/1748-5908-6-74

Rycroft-Malone J, Wilkinson JE, , Burton CR, Andrews G, Ariss S, Baker R, Dopson S,Graham I, Harvey G, Martin G, McCormack B Staniszewska S Thompson C. Collective action for implementation. (Paper in preparation)

Rycroft-Malone J, Burton C, Wilkinson J, Harvey G, McCormack B, Baker R, Dopson S, Graham I,
Staniszewska S, Thompson C, Ariss S, Melville-Richards L, Williams L (2015). Evaluating CLAHRCs Impacts and Process (National Institute for Health Research Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care). Main Project Report, in review with NIHR library.

Fri 04 November 2011, 08:03 | Tags: ECLIPS, CLAHRCs

Big Lottery Better care study: better lives for life-limited children in West Midlands

Funder: Big Lottery

Start date: September 2010. End date: September 2012.

Grant holder: ACT

Collaborators: Ann Hunt (Lancaster), Sophie Staniszewska (Warwick), Jane Coad (Coventry), Liz West (Greenwich), Nick Hex (York)

Description: The Big Study for Life-limited Children and their Families (The Big Study) is a research project, based in the West Midlands. Funded by Big Lottery Fund, this is the first in-depth study in the UK to examine how well the needs of children with life-limiting conditions and their families are being met.

The study will determine and map those services that are currently used by children with life-limiting and life-threatening conditions, identify and document children’s and families’ needs, and explore gaps in service provision and the accessibility of services to those who need them. It has a strong user involvement dimension, working with parents and young people in developing our understanding of acceptable, appropriate and effective services.

Progress: Work in all five strands (led by each university) is now underway. Sophie Staniszewska is leading on the user involvement strand – focusing on exploring and evaluating the difference users make to the research study. Lee Gunn was appointed as Research Fellow on the study and is developing user involvement within each strand. Overall, the study is progressing well. The first paper from the study has been submitted. ACT have now merged with another organisation to become Children’s Hospices UK.

Fri 04 November 2011, 08:01 | Tags: BIG Lottery

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