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Physics Department News

A Spin Entanglement Witness for Quantum Gravity - Is Gravity a Quantum Force?

Understanding gravity in the framework of quantum mechanics is one of the great challenges in modern physics. Along this line, a prime question is to find whether gravity is a quantum entity subject to the rules of quantum mechanics. It is fair to say that there are no feasible ideas yet to test the quantum coherent behaviour of gravity directly in a laboratory experiment. In a recent paper, Gavin Morley and colleagues introduce an idea for such a test based on the principle that two objects cannot be entangled without a quantum mediator.

Tue 21 November 2017, 17:55 | Tags: Research

350,000 stellar systems to be mapped by Warwick astronomers

Warwick Astronomers have joined the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-V), making Warwick the first UK institution to be formally part of the project. Within SDSS-V, Boris Gaensicke will lead a spectroscopic survey of all stars within 100pc of the Earth - encompassing 350,000 systems, many of which are likely to host planetary systems.

Fri 17 November 2017, 14:16 | Tags: Feature News, announcements

Gavin Bell selected as WIHEA Fellow for 2017-20

Dr Gavin Bell has become the first member of the Physics department to be selected as a fellow of the Warwick International Higher Education Academy (WIHEA).

A WIHEA Fellowship recognises and rewards outstanding achievements in learning and teaching and is an exceptional opportunity to engage with colleagues across the university, improve the student experience, make a genuine difference to Warwick and strengthen career development.

Fri 10 November 2017, 14:38 | Tags: Feature News, Staff and Department

First planet found by NGTS - it's a monster!

New research, led by Dan Bayliss and Peter Wheatley, has identified an unusual planet NGTS-1b - the largest planet compared to the size of its companion star ever discovered in the universe.

Dan Bayliss, lead author of the research, commented: "The discovery of NGTS-1b was a complete surprise to us - such massive planets were not thought to exist around such small stars. This is the first exoplanet we have found with our new NGTS facility and we are already challenging the received wisdom of how planets form."

Peter Wheatley added, “Having worked for almost a decade to develop NGTS, it is thrilling to see it picking out new and unexpected types of planets."

Tue 31 October 2017, 18:25 | Tags: Research, Faculty of Science

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