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Queen’s wedding cake resurrected with scanning tech for 70th Anniversary

Queen’s wedding cake resurrected with scanning tech for 70th Anniversary Cutting-edge technology has brought Queen Elizabeth II’s wedding cake back to life in time for hers and Prince Philip’s 70th anniversary, thanks to research by WMG at the University of Warwick.

Professor Mark Williams at WMG, alongside the British Sugarcraft Guild (BSG), employed 3D scanning technology to recreate a full-sized replica of a cake presented to the royal couple on their wedding day in November 1947 – which was almost totally destroyed by vandals in 2015.

The technology was able to accurately scan the cake to within 0.1mm and reproduce a high-resolution 3D model that was then be used to digitally repair the cake.

Analysing the surviving parts of the cake – an intricate 6ft ensemble, consisting of 6 tiers – Professor Williams was able to discover exactly how it was formed, and to determine precisely how to restore its original grandeur.

There were elaborate pictorial panels on each tier of the cake, the moulds of which had been lost through the decades. However, WMG’s engineering technology recreated these images from the wedding cake, and produced new silicone moulds through 3D scanning.

Thu 16 November 2017, 11:39 | Tags: Metrology Partnerships Homepage Article 1 Mark Williams Research

WMG technology helps Midlands cycle company create next generation bicycles for Transport for London

WMG technology helps Midlands cycle companyEngineers from WMG, at the University of Warwick, are providing advanced technology support for Stratford-Upon-Avon’s Pashley Cycles, England’s longest established bicycle manufacturer based in who, with Serco, who this week won the contract to supply the next generation of bicycles for the Transport for London (TfL) Cycle Hire Scheme.

Under the new contract Serco will introduce bicycles, made by Pashley, with the first ones available at the start of October 2017. The new bicycles, which will be produced in the company’s home town of Stratford-Upon-Avon, used WMG’s technical support and advice to help create cycles that are 10% lighter than the current model and that are designed to give a more manoeuvrable and comfortable riding experience.

Through the WMG centre High Value Manufacturing Catapult, based at the University of Warwick, and renowned for its expertise in light weighting, the WMG SME Group provided “additive layer manufacturing” and 3D printing assistance to enable Pashley to develop the new bicycle. This support played a significant part in creating the bike prototype, which in turn helped secure the TfL contract.

Tue 31 October 2017, 13:34 | Tags: SME Partnerships Research

Oldest known marine navigation tool revealed with scanning technology

Details of the oldest known marine navigation tool, discovered in a shipwreck, have been revealed thanks to state-of-the-art scanning technology at WMG, University of Warwick.

Professor Mark WilliamsProfessor Mark Williams was tasked with scanning the artefact – an astrolabe from the late fifteenth century, used by mariners to measure the altitude of the sun during voyages – which was excavated in 2014 by Blue Water Recovery.

When the team found the object, no markings were visible – they believed it was an astrolabe, but they could not see any navigational Astrolabemarkings on it.

They then approached Professor Williams, who conducts pioneering scanning analyses in his laboratory at WMG, to reveal the artefact’s invisible details.

The scans showed etches around the edge of the object, each separated by five degrees – proving that it is an astrolabe.

These markings would have allowed mariners to measure the height of the sun above the horizon at noon to determine their location so they could find their way on the high seas.

Tue 24 October 2017, 13:26 | Tags: Metrology Mark Williams Research

WMG gives free access to tool for companies preparing for Industry 4 – enabling the next generation of manufacturing

Jan GodsellWMG researchers, at the University of Warwick, have worked in conjunction with Crimson & Co and Pinsent Masons, to produce a free to access “Industry 4” readiness assessment tool. It is designed to provide a simple and intuitive way for companies to start to assess their readiness and future ambition to harness the potential of the new cyber-physical age

The term Industry 4 originates from the high-tech strategy of the German government, which soughtto re-define the role of manufacturing post the global economic crisis. It suggests that we are on thecusp of the 4th Industrial Revolution, a cyber physical age, which will be realised over the next 20years.

Mon 23 October 2017, 09:27 | Tags: Supply Chain and Operations Partnerships Jan Godsell Research

Midlands roads to be UK autonomous vehicle testbed

Intelligent VehiclesRoads in Coventry and Birmingham are set to become a world-class UK testbed for developing the next generation connected and autonomous (CAV) vehicles, thanks to a new £25m programme of investment being led by WMG at the University of Warwick.

The pioneering venture, undertaken by a consortium of research and industry partners, will make UK roads ready for CAVs by developing wireless networks, analysing how vehicles behave in real urban environments and involving the public in their evaluations.

The UK Central CAV Testbed will be based on 80 kilometres of urban roads in Coventry and Birmingham, creating a world-leading connected infrastructure and eco-system, and positioning the Midlands as a centre for cutting-edge automotive and communication technologies.

Thu 19 October 2017, 14:53 | Tags: Intelligent Vehicles Paul Jennings Partnerships Research

Universities' global connectivity via the air transport network gives significant insight to global rankings

Demand for higher educationThe demand for higher education is on the rise and so is the cost of education. When judging the quality of a university, ranking tables provide good indication of university quality. But when many universities fluctuate in those rankings from year to year, if you a prospective student or researcher, how should you choose the right university? Some base their decisions on employability figures, others consider factors like presence of inspirational academics, academic infrastructure, and diversity, but new research shows that universities in close proximity to large transportation hubs are set to succeed.

These are the important new findings from an interdisciplinary team of researchers from University of Warwick, and the Alan Turing Institute, Mr Marco Del Vecchio and Professor Ganna Pogrebna have recently appeared in a new article published in the Royal Society Open Science.

Dr Guo, Mr Del Vecchio and Professor Pogrebna look at the relation between universities’ performance (measured by the ARWU university ranking) and their global connectivity via the air transport network by analysing the data on all global airports and flights over a period from 2005 to 2016. They show that universities well-connected to global transportation hubs tend to grow in rankings faster than those of a similar ranking positioned in less connected parts. Interestingly, the key metric is proximity to airport hubs that have more direct flights to other hubs than the number of flights or the number of connections alone. For each university in the ranking, researchers calculate the university’s global connectivity coefficient and find that this coefficient helps to explain differences in the ranking.

Fri 06 October 2017, 13:10 | Tags: Education Research

WMG researchers at the University of Warwick part of new national £65 million battery research programme

Battery researchWMG researchers, at the University of Warwick, will be a significant part of a new £65 million national battery research initiative. The Faraday Institution, a new multi-million pound research institute, was announced on Monday 2nd October 2017, by Greg Clark, Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. It will drive and accelerate fundamental research in developing battery technologies, and its translation.

The Faraday Institution (FI) will be the UK’s independent, national institute for energy storage research. Funded through the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) from the government’s Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund (ISCF), the Faraday Institution is part of the coordinated activity between UKRI partners Innovate UK and EPSRC with the Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC) to meet the Faraday Battery Challenge, announced by the government in July, of delivering an integrated programme of research, innovation and the scale-up of novel battery technologies.

The UK’s leading battery researchers in academia worked closely with UK industry to assess the challenges and opportunities, and the seven university founders (Cambridge, Imperial, Newcastle, Oxford, Southampton, UCL and Warwick) proposed to charter an independent national Institution as the best way forward. The ambition of the Faraday Institution is to make the UK the go-to place for the research, development, manufacture and production of new electrical storage technologies for both the automotive and the wider relevant sectors.


Pregnancy loss biobank to receive £1.2million in funding

Research to help identify women at risk of pregnancy complications is to receive a huge financial boost.

The Medical Research Council (MRC) is to give The Tommy's Reproductive Health Biobank a grant of £1.2million.

The biobank will be the most significant collection of reproductive health tissues in the UK. Operating on a virtual basis with its server based at University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust (UHCW) and will begin operating on 29 September. It will store biological samples collected by scientists and clinicians at UHCW, the University of Warwick, University of Birmingham, Imperial College, Kings College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Manchester. The tissues, donated by women who have a history of pregnancy problems, and clinical data will help scientists find new causes and cures for miscarriage, stillbirth, and premature birth.

Tue 03 October 2017, 13:11 | Tags: Theo Arvanitis Research

Very light rail plans for Coventry move forward

Coventry VLRPlans for a very light rail service in Coventry moved a step closer today, as researchers from WMG, at the University of Warwick, unveiled early vehicle concept designs to representatives from Coventry City Council.

The project, funded by the Government’s Local Growth Fund through the Coventry and Warwickshire Local Enterprise Partnership and West Midlands Combined Authority Devolution Deal (which is subject to approval of the business case), is set to better connect the City. This will use a state-of-the-art rail system which will be cheaper, quieter and more environmentally friendly than anything currently available.

Councillors Jim O’Boyle and David Welsh will meet with Dr Nick Mallinson, Dr Darren Hughes and Dr James Winnett from WMG, at the University of Warwick, to showcase the latest plans which have been developed through an initial feasibility study.

Thu 28 September 2017, 10:51 | Tags: HVM Catapult Partnerships Research Manufacturing

Research finds that UK companies that consider both direct and indirect reshoring of manufacturing gain best performance boosts

A new report launched today by researchers at WMG at the University of Warwick, and Reshoring UK, finds that UK companies that consider both direct and indirect reshoring of manufacturing gain best performance boosts and urges companies to consider both approaches when developing their future strategies.

The report will be launched at WMG Supply Chain Research Group event entitled “Realities of Reshoring: A UK Perspective held tonight, Tuesday 26 September 2017, in the International Institute for Product and Service Innovation (IIPSI), WMG, at the University of Warwick.

Tue 26 September 2017, 13:23 | Tags: Supply Chain and Operations Homepage Article 4 Research

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