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Members


Dave Allen

David Allen is a clinical psychologist with over 37 years’ experience of working with people who have intellectual disabilities. He is currently an honorary Professor at the Tizard Centre, University of Canterbury, having previously held chairs at Cardiff University and the University of Glamorgan. He is also a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disability (IASSID). He is currently Clinical Director of Positive Response Training & Consultancy. Dave has a particular interest in Positive Behavioural Support (PBS) and reactive management strategies. He has been heavily involved in the British Institute of Learning Disabilities (BILD) initiatives in the field of physical intervention since 1993 and has produced several publications for BILD in that time. He is currently joint-editor of the International Journal for Positive Behavioural Support and was given a Leadership Award by BILD in 2012 in acknowledgement of his work on PBS.

Selected publications

Allen, D. ,McGill, P. & Smith, M. (in press) The Role of Positive Behavioural Support in Reducing the Use of Restrictive
Practices: A UK Perspective. In G.W. LaVigna & R. Liberman (Eds.) New Directions for Treatment of Aggressive Behavior in Mentally and Developmentally Disabled Persons.

Allen, D., Langthorne, P., Tonge, B., Emerson, E., McGill, P., Fletcher, R., Dosen, A. & Kennedy, C. (2013) Towards the Prevention of Behavioural and Psychiatric Disorders in People with Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 26,6, 501-514.

Perry, J. Allen, D, Pimm, C, Meek, K., Lowe, K. Groves, S., Cohen, D. & Felce, D. (2013) Adults with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour: the costs and outcomes of in- and out-of-area placements. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 57,2, 139-152.

Allen, D. (2011) Reducing the use of restrictive practices with people who have intellectual disabilities. Kidderminster: British Institute of Learning Disabilities.


Debbie Allen

Debbie Allen is a Research Fellow at the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of Birmingham. Her research interests are mainly within the field of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) with a particular interest in challenging behaviour in children with a severe intellectual disability. Her research to date, has focused on the assessment and treatment of self-injurious and other challenging behaviour, basic skills training for young children with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders and staff and parent training.

http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/psychology/people/profile.aspx?ReferenceId=10614

Selected Publications

Oliver, C., Adams, D., Allen, D., Bull, L., Heald, M., Moss, J., Wilde, L. and Woodcock, K. (2013). Causal models of clinically significant behaviors in Angelman, Cornelia de Lange, Prader-Willi and Smith-Magenis syndromes. International Review of Research in Developmental Disabilities, 44, 167-212.

Radstaake, M., Didden, R., Oliver, C., Allen, D. and Curfs, L. (2012). Functional analysis and functional communication training in individuals with Angelman syndrome. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 15, 91-104.

Allen, D., Oliver, C., Petty, J., Webster, P., Reid, D., Villa, D., Beaumont, S., Hyland, S., Arowolo, I., Jones, A., Gorniak, S. & Radstaake, M. (2010). Behavioural intervention for challenging behaviour in children with Angelman syndrome. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 54, 885. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2010.01328.x

Richards, C., Oliver, C., & Allen, D. (2010). The function of self-injurious behaviour in autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disability, 23, 431. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-3148.2010.00582.x


Jenn Austin

Jennifer L. Austin, Ph.D., BCBA-D is Principal Lecturer in Psychology at the University of South Wales, where she leads the Behaviour Analysis Unit and directs the postgraduate programs in behaviour analysis. Both her research and clinical work focus on how behaviour analytic assessment and intervention strategies can be applied with typically developing children, as well as examining what adaptations may be necessary for making our science “work” in mainstream classrooms. She has worked with numerous schools in the US and the UK, focusing primarily on those in disadvantaged communities. She currently is assisting several schools in South Wales in the implementation of Schoolwide Positive Behaviour Support and is examining how this framework can be adapted to Welsh education systems. She is the Past-President of the UK Society for Behaviour Analysis and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice. She is an Associate Editor for the European Journal of Behaviour Analysis and holds positions on the editorial boards of the Behavior Analysis Research and Practice and Education and Treatment of Children.

http://staff.southwales.ac.uk/users/1331-jlaustin

Selected publications

Austin, J. L., Groves, E. A., Reynish, L. C., & Francis, L. L. (2015). Assessing the utility of trial-based functional analyses in mainstream primary school classrooms. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 48, 274-288.

Austin, J. L., & Bevan, D. (2011). Using differential reinforcement of low rates to reduce elementary school children’s requests for teacher attention. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 451-461.

Austin, J. L, & Soeda, J. M. (2008). Fixed-time teacher attention to decrease off-task behaviors of typically developing third graders. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 41, 279-283.


Peter Baker

Dr Peter Baker (BCBA-D) is a Senior Lecturer in Intellectual Disability at the Tizard Centre, University of Kent. He worked as a Consultant Clinical Psychologist in Sussex for over 20 years where he had leadership responsibilities for learning disability psychology services in East Sussex & Brighton & Hove. He lectures at the Tizard Centre on Certificate, Diploma, Graduate and Masters programmes and is widely published in the area of challenging behaviour and intellectual disability including the original Unified Approach and the recent guidelines on managing challenging behaviour in the NHS. He is the joint senior editor of the International Journal of Positive Behaviour Support. Current research activity includes emotional support of staff working with people with intellectual disabilities who present challenging behaviour, evaluation of quality of life and Active Support.

https://www.kent.ac.uk/tizard/staff/Honorary/peter_baker.html

Selected publications

Wills, S, Shephard, J & Baker P (2013) Evaluating the impact of Positive Behaviour Support training on staff knowledge, attributions, emotional responses and helping behaviour: capturing hearts & minds. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 3,1,31-39

Daynes S, & Baker P (2014) A pilot evaluation of Positive Behavioural Support workshops for families: ‘It should have been offered years ago’. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 4,2,24-31.

Davison S, McGill P, Baker P, Allen, D (2015) A national UK survey of peripatetic support teams for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disability who display challenging behaviour. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5,1, 26-33.


Nick Barratt

Nick Barratt (BCBA) specialises in the field of learning disability and autism, with a particular emphasis on behaviour that challenges. He works for a not-for-profit organisation called Dimensions as its Head of Behaviour Support, and as an independent Consultant Behaviour Analyst. Nick is also a board member of UK Society for Behaviour Analysis (UK-SBA); Chair of the Applied Behaviour Analysis Forum and Chair of the UK-SBA’s PBS Special Interest Group. His interests are skills-based behavioural interventions, organisation-wide behaviour support, and improving the quality of behaviour support in the UK.

Selected publications

Co-author of a book with Baroness Sheila Hollins, Emeritus Professor of the Psychiatry of Disability and creator of the Books Beyond Words series. The book is called Feeling Cross and Sorting it Out, and focuses on the interactional nature of challenging behaviour.

Barratt, Nick and McGill, Peter and Hughes, Carl (2012). Antecedent influences on challenging behaviour: a preliminary assessment of the reliability, generalisability and validity of the Ecological overview. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 2 (2). pp. 31-41.


Nick Gore

Nick Gore is a clinical psychologist (HPC registered with chartered membership of the BPS) and lecturer/researcher in the field of learning disabilities based at Tizard Centre, University of Kent. Nick began his behavioural career as an undergraduate psychology student working on the UK Young Autism Project as an ABA tutor, senior tutor and later a consultant. He subsequently gained experience working as an assistant, trainee and clinical psychologist supporting children and adults with learning and developmental disabilities across a range of secure, community and educational contexts. Nick continues to provide behaviourally based clinical support via consultancy arrangements and positions with the NHS and delivers training in behavioural approaches on undergraduate and post-graduate programmes and to organisations nationally and internationally. Nick has particular research interests in the early intervention and use of Positive Behavioural Support amongst children, together with systems and supports to meet the emotional needs of staff and carers more broadly.

http://www.kent.ac.uk/tizard/staff/acadstaff/nick_gore.html

Selected publications

Gore, N.J., McGill, P., Toogood, S., Allen, D., Hughes, J.C., Baker, P., Hastings, R.P., Noone, S.J., & Denne, L.D. (2013). Definition and scope for Positive Behavioural Support. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 3 (2), 14-23.

Gore, N.J., & Umizawa, H. (2011). Challenging behaviour training for teaching staff and family carers of children with intellectual disabilities: a preliminary evaluation. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 8 (4), 266-275.

Gore, N.J., Hastings, R.P., & Brady, S. (2014). Early intervention for children with learning disabilities: making use of what we know. Tizard Learning Disability Research, 19 (4), 181-189.

Smith, M.P. & Gore, N.J. (2012). Outcome of a train the trainers approach to an acceptance-based stress intervention in a specialist challenging behaviour service. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 2 (1), 39-48.


Kate Grant

Kate Grant (BCBA) has over 18 years’ experience within the field of Behaviour Analysis. For the past 16 years, she has worked as CEO for the Jigsaw Trust that provides an integrated model for education through its School and Adult Services for individuals with Autism. Prior to this, Kate was involved in running an ABA Home Programme for her son for 2 years. Kate is a Chartered Secretary with a particular interest in Organisational Behaviour Management (OBM). For the past decade she has actively promoted the adoption of across-the-board standards for those using Behaviour Analysis and has worked with Nicholls State University, USA, to provide a Master’s Programme in Teaching as Behaviour Analysis for staff at Jigsaw to further promote excellence within this field. Kate has been involved with the working group and Interim Board that has successfully moved the UK-Society for Behaviour Analysis forward and is currently an active member of the Board.

Selected publications

Hawkins, E. L., & Grant, K. F. (2011). Intensive behavioural intervention in a school setting for ten years. European Journal of Behavior Analysis, 12, 557-566.


Corinna Grindle

Corinna Grindle (BCBA-D) has more than 20 years’ experience working with children and young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including autism. Her research interests include early intervention, challenging behaviour, and fostering academic learning for students with moderate and severe disabilities. She is an Associate Research Fellow at Warwick University.

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/cedar/staff/corinnagrindle/

Selected publications

Grindle, C., Hughes, J.C., Eldevik, S., Ondire, I., Randell, T., & Remington, B. (2013) Effect of computer simulation training on real life discrete trial teaching, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 569-578

Grindle, C., Hughes, J.C., Saville, M., Huxley, K., Kovshoff, H., Griffith, G. M., Walker Jones, E ., & Devonshire, K. (2012) Outcomes of a behavioral education model for children with autism in a mainstream school setting, Behavior Modification. 298-319

Grindle, C. F., Hughes, J. C., Saville, M., Huxley, K., & Hastings, R. P. (2013). Teaching early reading skills to children with autism using Mimiosprout Early Reading. Behavioral Interventions, 28, 203-224.


Emma Hawkins

Emma Hawkins (BCBA) is the Director of Education, Jigsaw CABAS School with overall responsibility for the teaching team at Jigsaw CABAS School and overall responsibility for the pupils' individualised curriculum and individualised behaviour guidelines. Jigsaw runs a very thorough professional development programme for all teaching staff as well as multiple research projects across the school. Emma is currently working on a PhD in applied behaviour analysis with the University of Kent. She is also working towards the Senior Behaviour Analyst rank within the CABAS system. Her main area of interest is ‘naming,’ the integration of speaker and listener behaviour, with children and young adults with autism.

Selected publications

Hawkins, E. L., & Grant, K. F. (2011). Intensive behavioural intervention in a school setting for ten years. European Journal of Behavior Analysis, 12, 557-566.

Hawkins, E., Kingsdorf, S., Charnock, J., Szabo, M., Middleton, E., Phillips, J., & Gautreaux, G. (2011). Using behaviour contracts to decrease antisocial behaviour in four boys with an autistic spectrum disorder at home and at school. British Journal of Special Education, 38, 201-208.

Hawkins, E., Kingsdorf, S., Charnock, J., Szabo, M., & Gautreaux, G. (2009). The Jigsaw CABAS® School: Protocols for inducing naming and observational learning. European Journal of Behavior Analysis, 10, 95-103.

May, R. J., Hawkins, E., & Dymond, S. (2012). Effects of tact training on emergent intraverbal vocal responses in adolescents with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43(4), 996-1004.


Kirsty Hayhoe

Kirsty Hayhoe (BCBA) is a Clinical Manager at Child Autism UK (formerly Peach). She has an MEd in Special Education: Autism from Birmingham University and is a registered nurse for people with LD. As part of a job share, she manages a team of 11 case managers who work through-out the UK delivering behaviour analysis to families and schools. Kirsty has been involved in the field of autism and ABA for over 20 years and has been in her current position for 10 years. Kirsty has designed training on a wide-variety of autism and ABA related topics and has delivered these to a variety of audiences, from small teams through to National Conferences. Kirsty contributed to the first stages of the NICE Autism guidelines, and was on the writing groups for the Autism Specific Safeguarding guidelines and the UK ABA Autism Education Competence Framework. Kirsty currently leads the Child Autism UK outcome research with Warwick University.


Maggie Hoerger

Dr. Maggie Hoerger, BCBA-D, is a Senior Lecturer in Education at Bangor University where she teaches on the MSc in Applied Behaviour Analysis. Her primary research interest is in developing affordable, evidence-based, and sustainable applications of ABA for use in maintained schools. She has worked closely with schools and local authorities across the UK to help them integrate ABA into their provision. In collaboration with Ysgol y Gogarth, Maggie and colleagues developed the British Early Special Schools Teaching (BESST) Model. BESST is an early years curriculum and classroom organisation model that allows all young children in special schools to receive an education based on the principles of ABA. She is currently evaluating the implementation of BESST in special schools across Wales and England. Maggie has published numerous studies in peer-reviewed journals with her doctoral students and received grant support for her work.

https://www.bangor.ac.uk/psychology/people/profiles/maggie_hoerger.php.en

Selected publications

Pritchard, D. Hoerger, M.L., Penney, H., Eiri, L., Hellawell. L., Fothergill. S., and Mace, F.C. (2015) Training Staff to Avoid Problem Behaviour Related to Restricting Access to Preferred Activities. Behaviour Analysis in Practice. DOI 10.1007/s40617-015-0061-4

Foran, D., Hoerger, M.L., Philpott, H., Walker-Jones, E.W., Hughes, J.C., and Morgan, J. (2015). Using Applied Behaviour Analysis as Standard Practice in a UK Special Needs School. British Journal of Special Education, 02/2015; DOI: 10.1111/1467-8578.12088.

Pritchard, D., Hoerger, M.L., and Mace, F.C. (2014). Treatment Relapse and Behavioral Momentum. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. 47(4), 814-833.

Walker-Jones, E., Hoerger, M.L., Hughes, J.C., Williams, B.M., Jones, B., Mosley, Y. Hughes, D.R., Prys, D. (2011). ABA and Diverse Cultural and Linguistic Environments: A Welsh Perspective. Journal of Behavioral Education, 20(4), 297-305.


Freddy Jackson Brown

Dr Freddy Jackson Brown is an HCPC chartered clinical psychologist with over 20 years’ experience working with children and families. His practice is child centred and focuses on helping individuals learnt the communication and everyday living skills needed to live a more independent and fulfilling life. He is the author of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Dummies (2016) and When Young People with Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Hit Puberty: A Parents Q&A Guide to Health, Sexuality and Relationships (due June 2016).


Edwin Jones

Edwin Jones Ph.D, is a Service Development Consultant at Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, UK. He is closely involved in service improvement, commissioning, training and policy development focussing on Positive Behavioural Support. Dr. Jones is an honorary fellow at the University of South Wales, a visiting lecturer at the International University of Catalonia, Barcelona, and an editorial board member of several journals. He chairs the All Wales Challenging Behaviour Community of Practice and is a member of the Welsh Government Learning Disability Advisory Group. Previously he was a Senior Research Fellow at The Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities, University of Wales Cardiff, where he developed Active Support. His main interests include Positive Behavioural Support, Challenging Behaviour, Active Support and Practice Leadership.

Selected publications

Denne, L., Jones, E., Lowe, K , Jackson Brown, F., and Hughes, C., (2015) Putting positive behavioural support into practice: the challenges of workforce training and development BILD, International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5,2, 43–54

Jones, E., & Lowe, K. (2013) Active Support as a primary prevention strategy for challenging behaviour. International Journal of Positive Behaviour Support, 3(1) 16-30.

Jones, E. (2013) Back To The Future: Developing Competent Services For People With Intellectual Disabilities And Challenging Behaviour, Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities Vol. 7: 1 pp. 5 - 17

Allen, D., Lowe, K., Baker, P., Dench, C., Hawkins, S., Jones, E. & James, W. (2011) Assessing the effectiveness of positive behaviour support: the P-CPO project. International Journal of Positive Behaviour Support, 1, 14-23.


Hanna Kovshoff

Dr Hanna Kovshoff is a Lecturer in Psychology at the University of Southampton. She has significant research and clinical experience in the field of autism spectrum disorders, and an interest in the application of interventions to educational contexts. Having originally trained as a School Psychologist at McGill University in Canada, her research focuses on the use of qualitative and quantitative methods to investigate cognitive mechanisms linked to developmental outcomes (i.e., social development and academic achievement) associated with disorders in developmental psychopathology with the ultimate aim of translating basic research findings to develop and assess the impact of a range of prevention and intervention methods (developmental, behavioural, parenting, pharmacological, psychological) for children with neurodevelopmental conditions and their families.

http://www.southampton.ac.uk/psychology/about/staff/hk.page

Selected publications

Choi,Y.K.K.,& Kovshoff, H., (2013) Do maternal attributions play a role in the acceptability of behavioural interventions for problem behaviour in children with autism spectrum disorders? Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 7, 984­996. doi: 10.1016/j.rasd.2013.04.010

Grindle, C.F.; Hastings, R.P.; Saville, M.; Hughes, J.C.; Huxley, K.; Kovshoff, H.; Griffith, G.M.; Walker-Jones, E.;
Devonshire, K.; & Remington, B. (2012). Outcomes of a Behavioral Education Model for Children With Autism in a Mainstream School Setting. Behavior Modification. 36, 298-319

Kovshoff, H.,Hastings, R. P., & Remington, B. (2011). Two-year outcomes for children with autism after the cessation of early intensive behavioral intervention. Behavior Modification, 35(5), 427-450. doi:10.1177/0145445511405513.

Grindle, CF.,Kovshoff, H., Hastings, R. P., & Remington, B. (2009). Parents experiences of home-based applied behaviour analysis programs for young children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39, 42-56. doi: 10.1007/s10803-008-0597-z


Katy Lee

Katy Lee (BCBA) is a consultant behaviour analyst and complex needs advisor currently in private practice providing consultancy support to individual clients, nurseries, schools, colleges and adult service centres wishing to implement evidence based behavioural approaches within their service offer. Katy spent 10 years as the clinical lead for the Ambitious about Autism charity where she led the service delivery model across two autism specific schools and the first independent specialist college for adults with complex autism and challenging behaviour underpinned by a behavioural approach. Katy was an elected member of the inaugural board of the UK Society for Behaviour Analysis (UK-SBA) and has served as an expert advisor for both the Autism Education Trust (AET) and the Centre for Research in Autism Education (CRAE). Katy is currently completing PhD research in the area of intervention and outcomes for children and young people with autism, complex needs and challenging behaviour under the supervision of Dr. Carl Hughes and Professor Richard Hastings.

Selected publications

Lambert-Lee, K.A., Jones, R.M., O’Sullivan, J., Hastings, R.P., Douglas-Cobane, E., Thomas, E.R., Hughes, J.C., & Griffith, G.M. (2015) Translating evidence based practice into a comprehensive educational model within an autism specific special school. British Journal of Special Education, 42 (1), 69-86.


Lesley Love

Lesley Love BCaBA has worked in the field of Special Education for 22 years. She was the Deputy Head teacher for 11 years at Treetops School in Thurrock (a state special school) where she set up and developed the first state school ABA programme of its kind in the UK, under the supervision of Dr V.J Carbone BCBA-D. She continued her career as Head teacher at Rainbow School, an independent ABA (VB) school for young people with Autism in Wandsworth. She is passionate about using ABA research to provide quality teaching programmes for people with Autism, and is currently working as a Consultant in order to help other schools and services set up quality provisions for children, young people and adults with Autism in the UK and overseas.


Kathy Lowe

Professor Kathy Lowe Ph.D, is a Service Development Consultant at Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, UK. Her key roles are in service improvement, training and research focusing on Positive Behavioural Support (PBS). She runs and was co-developer of three accredited e-learning qualifications in PBS. She is Visiting Professor at the University of South Wales, a visiting lecturer at the International University of Catalonia, Barcelona, a reviewer and editorial board member of several international journals. She is also involved in several advisory groups on the development of learning disability and challenging behaviour services. Prior to this she was Senior Lecturer at The Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities, University of Wales Cardiff, where she developed post-graduate/MSc courses in positive approaches to challenging behaviour and staffed housing.

Selected publications

Denne, L., Jones, E., Lowe, K , Jackson Brown, F., and Hughes, C., (2015) Putting positive behavioural support into practice: the challenges of workforce training and development BILD, International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5,2, 43–54

Davies, B, Griffiths, J., Liddiard, K., Lowe, K. & Stead, L. (2015): Changes in staff confidence and attributions for challenging behaviour after training in positive behavioural support within a forensic medium secure service. The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, 26(6), 847-861.

Gray, D., Smith, M., Nethell, G., Allen, D. & Lowe, K. (2013) Positive behavioural support as a clinical model within acute assessment and treatment services. International Journal of Positive Behaviour Support, 3(1) 40-46.

Jones, E., & Lowe, K. (2013) Active Support as a primary prevention strategy for challenging behaviour. International Journal of Positive Behaviour Support, 3(1) 16-30.


Richard May

Richard May (BCBA-D) currently holds the post of Lecturer in Psychology at the University of South Wales, Cardiff where he serves as the Course Leader for the Psychology with Behaviour Analysis BSc award. In this capacity he teaches on the Psychology BSc and Childhood Development BSc, and the Behaviour Analysis MSc. and Clinical and Abnormal Psychology MSc awards. Richard also provides both research and clinical supervision at the undergraduate, masters, and doctoral level, and is part of the supervision team for the only BACB-approved Post Graduate Certificate in Supervised Practice Award available in Europe. He has practiced in the field of Applied Behaviour Analysis for over 12 years in both the U.K. and in Canada across a range of service settings, including the PAWB Autism Clinic at the University of South Wales, and the Toronto Partnership for Autism Service (TPAS). His clinical specialties include early intervention for pre-school and school age children with a diagnosis of autism and other developmental disabilities, staff and parent training, and early language intervention. His research interests concern the domains of autism, verbal behaviour, and derived relational responding. Richard also currently serves (2014-2016) as a member-at-large on the Board of the U.K. Society for Behaviour Analysis (UK-SBA).

http://staff.southwales.ac.uk/users/5368-rjmay

Selected publications

May, R. J., Downs, R., Marchant, A., & Dymond, S. (In Press). Emergent verbal behavior in preschool children learning a second language. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis

Still, K., May, R.J., Rehfeldt, R.A., Whelan, R., & Dymond. S. (2015). Facilitating derived requesting skills with a touchscreen tablet computer for children with autism spectrum disorder. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 19, 44-58. doi: 10.1016/j.rasd.2015.04.006

Walsh, S., Horgan, J., May, R.J., Dymond, S., & Whelan, R. (2014). Facilitating relational framing in children and individuals with developmental delay using the Relational Completion Procedure. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior,101, 51-60.

May, R.J., Hawkins, E., & Dymond, S. (2013). Effects of tact training on emergent intraverbal vocal responses in adolescents with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43, 996-1004.


Claire McDowell

Dr Claire McDowell is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and lecturer in Behaviour Analysis in the School of Psychology at Ulster University, Northern Ireland. Upon completion of her PhD in 2000, Dr McDowell went on to work as Director of Education for Saplings School for Children with Autism, before returning to Ulster University in 2007 to direct the MSc in Applied Behaviour Analysis. For the past 8 years she has taught at pre degree, degree and postgraduate level, as well as supervising nine PhD students ( 4 to completion) and over 40 MSc/MRes research students. Her research has primarily been in the area of: Evidence based education for children at risk of academic failure; Precision teaching and generative instruction; Food selectivity and feeding disorders in young children.

https://www.ulster.ac.uk/staff/ce.mcdowell.html

Selected publications

Storey, C., McDowell, C. & Leslie, J.C. (Under review) Evaluating the efficacy of Headsprout© reading program with children who have spent time in care. Behavioural Interventions

Patterson, K & McDowell, C. (2009). Using precision teaching strategies to promote self-management of inner behaviour and measuring the effects on symptoms of depression. European Journal of Behaviour Analysis, 10, 2, pp. 283-296

McDowell, C., Duffy, K., & Kerr, K., P. (2007). Increasing Food Acceptance and reducing challenging behaviour in a four-year-old girl with autism. European Journal of Behavior Analysis Vol. 8, No. 2, pp. 267-276.

Kerr, K.P., Smyth, P. & McDowell, C. (2003). Precision teaching: Designing effective teaching programmes for children with Autism. Early Child Development & Care. 173 (4). Pp. 399-410.


Peter McGill

Peter McGill is Professor in the Clinical Psychology of Learning Disability at the University of Kent, England. Peter has worked in learning disability for over 35 years, as an instructor, residential social worker, behaviour analyst and clinical psychologist. He joined the Tizard Centre in 1986, was Director from 1999-2004 and became Co-Director in 2011. His research interests centre on challenging behaviour. He developed a Diploma course at Kent which trained over 200 practitioners from all over the UK in systematic ways of working with people labelled as challenging. He is an author of over 80 articles, chapters and books on learning disability. Peter has been a Trustee of the Challenging Behaviour Foundation since 2005 and is Editor of the Tizard Learning Disability Review.

http://www.kent.ac.uk/tizard/staff/acadstaff/peter_mcgill.html

Selected publications

Emerson, E., McGill, P., & Mansell, J. (Ed.). (1994). Severe Learning Disabilities and Challenging Behaviours: Designing High Quality Services. London: Chapman & Hall.

Langthorne, P., McGill, P., O’Reilly, M., Lang, R., Machalicek, W., Chan, J. & Rispoli, M. (2011) Examining the function of problem behaviour in Fragile X Syndrome: preliminary experimental analysis. American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 116, 65-80.

Mansell, J., McGill, P. & Emerson, E. (2001) Development and evaluation of innovative residential services for people with severe intellectual disability and serious challenging behaviour. In L.M. Glidden (Ed.) International Review of Research in Mental Retardation (pp.245-298). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

McGill, P. (1999) Establishing operations: Implications for the assessment, treatment and prevention of problem behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 32, 393-418.


Clodagh Murray

Clodagh Murray PhD, BCBA-D is a Lecturer in Applied Behaviour Analysis at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Her research and practice focus on improving educational outcomes for students who are marginalised due to disability or circumstance. She began her career in ABA in an early intervention school for children with autism. Since then she has worked with people with acquired brain injury and a range of other disabilities. She coordinated Ireland’s first ABA classroom in a mainstream secondary school, targeting literacy, attendance and self-management for teenagers from marginalised communities who were at high risk of early school leaving. Clodagh’s research interests include teaching play and early language skills to children with developmental disabilities, increasing variability in multiple behavioural repertoires, precision teaching and school drop-out prevention. Clodagh is Senior Consultant at The Ark Centre for children with autism in Chelmsford, Essex.

Selected publications

Murray, C., & Healy, O. (2015). An examination of response variability in children with autism and the relationship to restricted repetitive behaviour subtypes. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 11, 13-19.

Healy, O; Lydon, S; Murray, C (2014) 'Aggressive Behavior' In: Evidence-Based Practice and Intellectual Disabilities. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.

Murray, C., & Healy, O. (2013). Increasing response variability in children with autism spectrum disorder using lag schedules of reinforcement. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 7, 1481-1488.


Steve Noone

Steve Noone is currently a consultant clinical psychologist in the North East and works as the pathway lead for adults who have a learning disability in a large mental health Trust. He has worked as a psychologist with people with learning disabilities for over 25 years. Before moving to the north east he worked in Bangor University as a joint appointment for several years. He helped to develop the MSc in Applied Behaviour Analysis and delivered the clinical behavioural analysis course. As part of that course he taught how Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may be used to understand the emotional and cognitive responses of carers responding to behaviours that challenge. He ran some of the first studies to evaluate an ACT based intervention with care staff. He has recently obtained a Research for Patient Benefit grant to evaluate Positive Behavioural Support and ACT for parents of adults with learning disability and behaviour that challenges. He was a member of the NICE guidelines development group for behaviours that challenge.

Selected publications

Noone, S. (2013) Supporting Care Staff Using Mindfulness and Acceptance Based Approaches. In Psychological Therapies for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Taylor, J.L., Lindsay, W.R., Hastings, R.P., & Hatton, C. (Editors). Wiley. London

Noone, S., & Hastings, R.P. (2011). Values and Psychological Acceptance as Correlates of Burnout in Support Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities. Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities. 4, (2) 79-89.

Noone, S., & Hastings, R.P. (2010). Using acceptance and mindfulness-based workshops with support staff caring for adults with Intellectual Disabilities. Mindfulness. Vol1. 2, 67-73.

Noone, S.J., & Hastings, R.P. (2009). Building psychological resilience in support staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities. Pilot evaluation of an acceptance-based intervention. Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 13 (1) 1-11.


Ciara Padden

Ciara Padden is a Lecturer in Learning Disability at the Tizard Centre, University of Kent. Prior to this, she worked as a behavioural consultant in Ireland, working with clients with intellectual and developmental disabilities (including autism) and their families, teachers, and carers, across a range of age groups and settings. Her research interests include staff and parent training in behavioural approaches, family wellbeing, evidence-based educational interventions for children with special educational needs, and behavioural interventions aimed at increasing independence for adolescents and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

http://www.kent.ac.uk/tizard/staff/acadstaff/ciara_padden.html

Selected publications

Foody, C., James, J. E., & Leader, G. (2015). Parenting stress, salivary biomarkers, and ambulatory blood pressure: A comparison between mothers and fathers with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45, 1084-1095.

Lydon, S., Healy, O., Moran, L., & Foody, C. (2015). A quantitative examination of punishment research. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 36, 470-484.

Foody, C., James, J. E., & Leader, G. (2014). Parenting stress, salivary biomarkers, and ambulatory blood pressure in mothers of children with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 8, 99-110.

Mulligan, S., Healy, O., Lydon, S., Moran, L., & Foody, C. (2014). An analysis of treatment efficacy for stereotyped and repetitive behaviours in autism. Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 1, 143-164.


Maria Saville

Maria Saville (BCBA) is the Principal Manager of the Positive Behaviour Support Service (PBSS), Halton Borough Council and an honorary research officer for Bangor University. Maria has over 17 years’ experience of working with persons who engage in behaviour that challenge services. An extensive amount of her experience has been working with individuals who have a diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Condition (ASC). For the last 15 years Maria has worked in a variety of behaviour analytic settings, including home/school based EIBI and Positive Behaviour Support. For four years Maria worked at Westwood School, which hosted the first UK mainstream school based EIBI unit. This was part of a joint research collaboration between Bangor University and Flintshire and Wrexham County Council. For the last five years Maria has worked for Halton Borough Council, developing the first council based, BCBA led Positive Support Service in the UK. Maria has worked personally and collaboratively on several research projects utilising behaviour analysis with individuals who have ASC including the treatment of food selectivity problems, Early Intensive Behaviour Intervention (EIBI) and educational based behaviour analytic models. More recently Maria has worked with the London School of Economics to explore the potential cost benefits of Positive Behaviour Support.

Selected publications

Iemmi V., Knapp M., Saville M., McWade P., McLennan K. Toogood, S. (2015c) Positive behaviour support for adults with intellectual disabilities and behaviour that challenges: an initial exploration of the economic case. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5: 16-25.

Toogood, S, Saville, M, McLennan, K, McWade, P, Morgan, G, Welch, C and Nicholson, M (2015)‘Providing positive behavioural support services: Specialist challenging behaviour support teams’, International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5(1), 6-15.

Toogood, S, O’Regan, D, Saville, M, McLennan, K, Welch, C, Morgan, G and McWade, P (2015)‘Providing positive behavioural support services: Referral characteristics, resource allocation, case management and overview of outcomes, International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5(2), 25–32.

Grindle, C, Hastings, R, Saville, M, Hughes, C, Huxley, K, Kovshoff, H, Griffith, G, Walker-Jones, E, Devonshire, K and Remington, B (2012) Outcomes of a behavioural education model for children with autism in a mainstream school setting, Behaviour Modification, 36(3) 298–319


Rebecca Sharp

Dr Rebecca Sharp (BCBA) is a Lecturer and the Director of the Applied Behaviour Analysis Programme at Bangor University, where her students nominated her for a student-led teaching award in her first semester. She has been an invited speaker in research and clinical settings around the world, and has published articles on behaviour analytic approaches to challenging behaviour and measurement. Rebecca’s research interests include behaviour analytic approaches to working with people with dementia and traumatic brain injury. As a clinician, Rebecca has worked with recidivist youth offenders, children with brain injury, and adults and children with learning disabilities.

https://www.bangor.ac.uk/psychology/people/profiles/rebecca_sharp.php.en

Selected publications

Sharp, R. A., Phillips, K. J., & Mudford, O. C. (2012). Comparisons of interventions for rumination maintained by automatic reinforcement. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 6, 1107–1112.

Sharp, R. A., Mudford, O. C., & Elliffe, D. M. (2015). Representativeness of direct observations selected using a work sampling equation. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 48, 153-166.

Sharp, R. A., & Mudford, O. C. (2015). Distribution of reported durations of behavior in applied behavioral research. Behavioral Interventions, 30, 352-363.

Sharp, R. A., Mudford, O. C., & Elliffe, D. M. (2015). A data-based method for selecting a representative behavioural observation measurement system. European Journal of Behavior Analysis, 16, 279-294.


Esther Thomas

Esther Thomas (BCBA) is a Senior Behaviour Analyst – Training and Consultancy at Ambitious about Autism with a project focus on developing an early year’s assessment service. Esther has extensive experience in providing consultancy for children and young people with autism across different settings. These include experience in designing and programming personalised and comprehensive curriculum, implementing and supervising, monitoring and evaluating ABA provision for children and young adults with autism. Esther’s main research interests include early intervention for autism and outcomes, assessments, staff training and competencies. She is committed and passionate about making the ordinary possible for all children with autism through evidence based practice.

Selected publications

Thomas, E.R. (2016). Meltdowns and how to forestall them. Special Children, 229, 38 – 39

Denne, L. D., Thomas, E., Hastings, R. P., & Hughes, J. C. (2015). Assessing competencies in applied behavior analysis for tutors working with children with autism in a school-based setting, Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders 20, 67–77.

Lambert-Lee, K.A., Jones, R.M., O’Sullivan, J., Hastings, R.P., Douglas-Cobane, E., Thomas, E.R., Hughes, J.C., & Griffith, G.M. (2015) Translating evidence based practice into a comprehensive educational model within an autism specific special school. British Journal of Special Education, 42 (1), 69-86.


Sandy Toogood

Sandy Toogood (BCBA-D) works independently as a behaviour analyst service design consultant and clinical supervisor, specialising in supporting services for children and adults whose behaviour challenges services. He is also a part-time Senior Lecturer in Applied Behaviour Analysis at Bangor University, where he supervises MSc and jointly supervises PhD research students.

Sandy’s current interests are in disseminating good practice in Positive Behavioural Support, functional assessment and multi-layered behavioural intervention, using contingency diagrams to aid analysis and communicating ideas about behavioural function. He is also interested in extending Active Support within existing and to new populations, and into novel service contexts.

Selected publications

Toogood. S., Totsika, V., Jones., E., and Lowe., K. (2016) Active Support. In N.N. Singh (Eds) Handbook of Evidence-Based Practices in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities. Springer International Publishing, Switzerland.

Toogood, S., O'Regan, D., Saville, M., McLennan, K., Welch, C., Morgan, G., & McWade, P. (2015). Providing positive behavioural support services: referral characteristics, resource allocation, case management and overview of outcomes. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5(2), 25-32.

Toogood, S., Saville, M. H., McLennan, K., McWade, P., Morgan, G., Welch, C., & Nicholson, M. (2015). Providing positive behavioural support services: specialist challenging behaviour support teams. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 5(1), 6-15.

Gore, N. J., McGill, P., Toogood, S., Allen, D., Hughes, J. C., Baker, P., ... & Denne, L. D. (2013). Definition and scope for positive behavioural support. International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support, 3(2), 14-23.


Vaso Totsika

Vaso Totsika is currently a Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research (CEDAR) at the University of Warwick. Her research at CEDAR follows two parallel strands: one strand focuses on the field of intellectual and developmental disabilities. An ongoing project is exploring developmental trajectories of children’s behaviour and the role of the early years’ family environment, using secondary analyses of national data. The second strand focuses on evaluation of interventions at the interface of education and psychology. A number of these are centred around special educational needs. An ongoing project is the evaluation of the introduction of the EHC plans under the Children and Families Act 2014.

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/cedar/staff/vtotsikaprofile

Selected publications

Priday, L., Byrne, C., & Totsika, V. (in press). Behavioural interventions for sleep problems in people with an intellectual disability: A systematic review and meta-analysis of single-case and group studies. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research.

Totsika, V., Hastings, R.P., Emerson, E., Berridge, D.M., & Lancaster, G. (2015).Prosocial skills in young children with autism, and their mothers’ psychological well-being: longitudinal relationships. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. 13-14, 25-31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rasd.2015.01.001 

Grey, J.M., Griffith, G.M., Totsika, V., & Hastings, R.P. (2015). Families’ experiences of seeking out-of-home accommodation for their adult child with an intellectual disability. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 12, 47-57.

Toms, G., Totsika, V., Hastings, R.H, Healy, H. (2015). Access to services by children with intellectual disability and mental health problems: Population-based evidence from the UK. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 40, 239-247.