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Education and Training

Key statistics:

  • The sector workforce is highly qualified with 54% of the workforce having gained a least a Level 4 qualification.
  • 31% of the workforce has a Level 2 or 3 qualification.
  • Self-employed workers are more likely (57%) to have Level 4 or above qualifications than employed workers (50%).
  • Employers in Cultural Heritage have the highest expectations of new recruits, with 47% expecting new recruits to be qualified to degree level as a minimum and 7% expecting postgraduate qualifications.
  • Between 25% and 29% of employers expect A-Level qualifications as a minimum. This excludes cultural heritage and performing arts, in which 19% and 18% of employers respectively expect A-Level as a minimum
  • Performing arts, music and craft appear to have the most open approach to qualifications, with approximately 60% of employers in each requiring no minimum level of qualification.

Source: Creative & Cultural Skills AACS LMI report 2010 and Creative and Cultural Industry Impact and Footprint 2008/09


Education and training opportunities

There are an estimated 180,000 courses related to the creative and cultural sector. Further Education courses in technical support services such as lighting, sound recording and stage management are useful as entry level to accredited Higher Education courses in the drama sub-sector.

Further Education courses in wigs/hairdressing and make-up are also important. It is not uncommon in the arts sector for there to be progression from school to Further Education (preparatory awards such as the Foundation Art & Design qualification) to Higher Education. There is a high level of competition for arts-related Higher Education places. Places on music and drama courses are more competitive than the norm.

There is a strong tradition in the sector of development opportunities being offered by Higher Education at postgraduate level. There is a perception, however, that graduates of Further and Higher Education institutions may leave equipped with a degree, but they have little understanding or knowledge of the industry they believe they are ready to enter.

Sources: Skills Needs Assessment 2007, Gap analysis and market testing 2007 and Understanding Supply 2007

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Qualification level of workforce

Craft

  • 46% of the creative workforce hold a qualification above level 4, whereas, only 28% of the craft workforce hold a qualification above level 4.
  • Self-employed workers in craft are far more likely to have a qualification above level 4 (46%) than those who are not self-employed (17%).
  • 10% of the workforce has no qualification.

Cultural heritage

  • 46% of the creative workforce hold a qualification above level 4, whereas, 50% of the cultural heritage workforce hold a qualification above level 4.
  • Self-employed workers are more likely to have a qualification above level 4 than those who are employed (70% and 49% respectively).
  • 8% of the workforce has no qualification.

Design

  • 46% of the creative workforce holds a qualification above level 4, whereas 50% of the design workforce holds a qualification above level 4.

Music

  • 46% of the creative workforce holds a qualification above level 4, whereas 36% of the music workforce holds a qualification above level 4.
  • Self-employed workers in music are more likely to have a qualification above level 4 (46%) than those who are not self-employed (28%).

Literature

  • 46% of the creative workforce holds a qualification above level 4, whereas 67% of the literature workforce holds a qualification above level 4.
  • Self-employed workers are more likely to have a qualification above level 4 (71%) than employed colleagues (59%).
  • There is little difference of qualification level between genders.

Visual Arts

  • 46% of the creative workforce holds a qualification above level 4, whereas 57% of the visual arts workforce holds a qualification above level 4.
  • Self-employed workers are more likely to have a qualification above level 4 than those employed (71%/26%).
  • Employed workers are nearly 5 times more likely to have a level 2 qualification as their highest qualification than self-employed workers.

Source: Creative and Cultural Industry Impact and Footprint 2008/09

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Training

Over the last 12 months, 61% of employers in the sector have not undertaken or provided any training or development, because:

  • Staff are already fully proficient (50%)
  • They do not have time for training (27%)
  • They lack the funds for training (14%)

Some employers reported that they had not provided training/development opportunities because staff were not keen to participate in training or because no suitable training was available in terms of mode of delivery or at the right level.

The most popular forms of training are considered to be those that people can engage in on an ad-hoc basis and which, in general, require investment in terms of time as opposed to money.

As many people working within the creative and cultural sectors are either freelance or sole traders, it’s not always possible for them to undertake training as they could lose income by doing so. Perhaps not surprisingly therefore, the larger the employer, the more likely they are to arrange training for their employees.

Source: Creative & Cultural Skills AACS LMI report 2010

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Industry related courses

The Creative and Cultural footprint is vast and what follows below is by no means an exhaustive list of industry related courses and useful websites from across the sectors.

Young Apprenticeships: 14-16 year olds

The Young Apprenticeship (YA) programme is for 14-16 year-olds. Young people with both a talent and an interest in drama, art and design can obtain an additional qualification in their chosen subject and also get vital industry experience (50 days over 2 years). Further details on the programme and how it relates to the creative and cultural industries can be found in the Youth Apprenticeship website.

Both the Young Apprenticeships and the Creative Apprenticeships described below aim to increase diversity across the workforce. This document provides further information on diversity within the Young Apprenticeships scheme. Click here for more general information on apprenticeships.

Creative Apprenticeships: for those aged 16 and above

This programme is a progression route for Young Apprenticships and also provides an alternative education route for those aged 16 or over. The apprenticeship allows people of all ages to specialise, re-train and gain invaluable industry-relevant experience in order to become employable within job roles where there are recognised skills gaps. It also allows the apprentice to learn key business skills needed for the creative sector and is aimed at those who want on-the-job training whilst earning a wage. The apprenticeship will have core business units delivered by a college or training provider and then specialist pathways delivered by the employer - focusing on a particular career path such as a curator, a graphic designer or a theatre technician.

Source: Information provided by Creative and Cultural Skills 2008

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Sector specific courses

Advertising and design

DANDAD run workshops for people at all stages in their career:

  • Recent Graduates - their Workshops in Design and Advertising are aimed at people trying to get their first job in their chosen field. Students who have graduated within the last three years are eligible to apply.
  • Experienced workers - the DANDAD Workout is for those people with industry experience who are now looking for professional
    development opportunities.

Music

Jazz Services is the UK’s national jazz organisation and includes details of jazz courses, orchestras, tutors and institutions.

Music Leader provides access to training and professional development for music leaders at every stage of their career. It has information on training, funding, courses, career development and workshops as well tips and guidelines on how to create your own training programme.

Musical Routes provides details of musical courses in London.

Sound Sense is a professional body providing professional development opportunities for community musicians. Their website provides details of all the latest community music training courses, conferences, events and networking activities.

Youth Music works alongside the formal and community-based sectors to support music-making and training; activities are held mainly outside of school hours and delivered by non-profit making organisations.

Literary Arts

Literature Training provides information on training and development opportunities open to writers across the UK. The site is updated daily.

Source: Information provided by Creative and Cultural Skills 2008

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Entry and progression in the creative and cultural sector

In many cases the sector is not perceived as a viable career option, that routes into the industry are opaque and that people work because they have a passion for creativity, rather than to earn a living.

Entry into the sector, occupational routes and career progression, and knowledge around business growth in innovative small organisations is not clear.

There is a tradition of volunteering as a formal route in to employment in the sector. Consequently, the workforce is predominately white and middle class. The history of low pay/voluntary routes into the sector excludes those that cannot afford to support themselves whilst they get established.

Across the sector, learning through experience is a key feature and few occupations can be successfully entered fully trained by education.

Source: Information provided by Creative and Cultural Skills 2008

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