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Sub-sectors


Community learning and development

The community learning and development industry comprises staff working in community based settings, in for example: community based adult learning; community development; community education; development education; family learning; working with parents; and youth work. Much of the activity in the industry is voluntary.

Key statistics:

  • There are 334,041 people working in the community learning and development industry across the UK.
  • In England, 7% of the workforce is employed full-time, 45% are seasonal/hourly paid, 40% work part-time.
  • In England, 91% of the workforce described ‘teaching’ as their main activity.
  • In England, 24% of the workforce is male
  • 22% of the workforce is 40 years or under (in England)

In some areas, there is a demand for ethnic minority youth workers, male youth workers and parenting practitioners. More qualified staff are required for certain jobs, including:

  • Community development workers
  • Community education officers
  • Youth worker and youth support workers

The main skills required in the sub-sector include:

  • Management and leadership
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT) skills
  • Other constituency specific skills, including partnership working, outreach skills and the ability to promote social inclusion and empower communities

Some skills shortages are around the professionals and support staff.

Source: LLUK LMI March 2010

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Further education

The further education industry includes staff involved in the delivery, support and management of learning who work in general further education (FE) colleges, tertiary colleges, 6th form colleges, independent specialist colleges, Scotland’s further education colleges and post-16 learning in Northern Ireland and Wales.

Key statistics:

  • There are 305,243 people working in further education, of which:
  • 263,257 staff are in England
  • 6,357 staff are in Northern Ireland
  • 21, 604 are in Scotland
  • 14, 025 are in Wales
  • A higher proportion of female staff are employed part-time than male staff.
  • A further education lecturer usually works 37 hours a week, with around 25 hours spent teaching.
  • In England, 63% of all further education staff (including administrative and support roles) are female; 59% of teaching staff and 83% learning support workers are female.
  • 52% of the workforce in England is 45 years or over.

The main skills shortages in the sub-sector include:

  • Specific shortage subjects: Maths; Skills for Life; engineering; information and communication technology (ICT); science; business administration; management; health and social care
  • Skills for Life (and its equivalents: Essential Skills; Adult Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL)
  • Management and leadership
  • Other constituency specific skills, including: gaining current industry experience; updating vocational courses; developing a wider range of teaching and learning support skills

Skills shortages are highest amongst associate professionals (including learning support staff) in England (13.9%).

Source: LLUK LMI March 2010

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Higher education

The higher education sector represents all staff involved in the delivery, support and management of learning and research in universities, university colleges and colleges of higher education.

Key statistics:

  • There are 372,455 people working in higher education, of which:
  • 306,625 staff are in England
  • 7,540 staff are in Northern Ireland
  • 38,980 are in Scotland
  • 19,315 are in Wales
  • 47% of the workforce is male.
  • Females are most likely to be under 30 years, whilst males are more likely to 55 years over.
  • 46% of the workforce is academic professionals.
  • 64% of non-academic staff are female.
  • 59% of academic staff are male.
  • 67% of the workforce is employed full-time.
  • 70% of the workforce is employed on open-ended or permanent contracts.
  • 57% of academic professional staff and 81% of other staff are employed on open-ended or permanent contracts.

The main skills shortages in the sub-sector include:

  • Technicians qualified to NVQ level 4 or above
  • Management and leadership
  • Skills related to the widening participation agenda, i.e. skills to cater to a wider student body with diverse learning styles and demands

Future demand is expected for skilled teachers in: business management; IT; economics; electronics; law; and medicine.

Source: LLUK LMI March 2010

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Libraries, archives and information services

The libraries, archivists and information service (LAIS) industry involves those undertaking these activities in institutions whose primary purpose is lifelong learning. This includes public libraries and archives, higher education and further education libraries and archives, and national libraries and archives.

  • There are 58,537 people working in the sub-sector, of which:
  • 48,982 staff in England
  • 1,055 staff in Northern Ireland
  • 5,388 in Scotland
  • 3,112 in Wales
  • 59% of the workforce is female.
  • 37% of the female workforce is at the most senior levels.
  • Women represent over 50% of those employed as information officers.
  • Up to 60% of archivists are women and they are well represented at senior level.

The main skills shortages in the sub-sector include:

  • Information and communication technology (ICT) skills: digitisation; metadata management; database building; basic and advanced ICT user skills; web management and web content development
  • Specific technical skills: cataloguing; indexing; stock selection; conservation; preservation; information retrieval and management; knowledge management; CMS
  • Customer engagement: interpersonal and communication skills; language skills (Welsh language in Wales); skills to support adults with needs in terms of Skills for Life (and its equivalents); community engagement skills, partnership working skills
  • Management and leadership

The Society of Archivists is actively trying to encourage religious and ethnic diversity in its recruitment.

 Source: LLUK LMI March 2010

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Work-based learning

The work-based learning industry covers staff working for organisations concerned with the delivery of training and assessment for the workplace. The industry provides work focused learning opportunities relevant to the workplace environment. Staff work for:

  • National training providers
  • Specialist training providers
  • Private sector training organisations
  • Voluntary and community local community organisations
  • Regional charities
  • National third sector bodies

Staff can also work in: the training divisions of other bodies including large employers (such as travel or retail, further education colleges, Local Authorities, Higher Education institutions); or a specialist division within a body (such as a recruitment agency).

Key statistics:

  • In the sub-sector, there are 41,525 working, of which:
  • 30,000 staff in England
  • 1,625 staff in Northern Ireland
  • 6,900 in Scotland
  • 3,000 in Wales
  • 39% of the UK workforce is male.
  • 47% of the workforce is aged 40 years or under
  • In England, 36% of the workforce described their main activity as ‘teaching’.
  • In England, 62% of the workforce is employed full-time

The main skills shortages in the sub-sector include:

  • Management and leadership
  • Assessment and internal verification skills
  • Skills for Life (and its equivalents: Essential Skills; Adult Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL)
  • Updating of industrial practices

 The main skills shortages in the sub-sector include:

  • Management and leadership
  • Assessment and internal verification skills
  • Skills for Life (and its equivalents: Essential Skills; Adult Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL)
  • Updating of industrial practices

Source: LLUK LMI report March 2010

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