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Education and Training

  • Only 8.5% of the workforce hold a Level 4 or above qualification, compared with 33% across the UK economy.
  • 18.3% have no or low level qualifications, compared with 27% across the UK economy.
  • 35.3% hold a Level 2 qualification, compared with 21% across the UK economy.
  • 7.8% hold Level 3 qualifications, compared with 19% across the UK economy.

Source: Habia Skills Needs Assessment 2007


Vocational qualifications

Vocational qualifications are available in beauty therapy, hairdressing, barbering, salon reception and salon management. Over 80% of the workforce possess or are working towards some form of relevant qualification.

Hairdressers are six times more likely to hold a recognised professional vocational qualification than workers in any other sector.

Achievement of vocational qualifications in hairdressing and beauty therapy is high. 39.2% of the sector workforce has achieved an S/NVQ qualification, compared with 13.2% of the UK economy. 26.9% hold City and Guilds qualifications, compared with 11.8% of the UK economy.

Source: Assessment of current provision: hair and beauty sector – England 2008 and Habia Skills Needs Assessment 2007


Higher education

Only 2.9% of the workforce has a degree level qualification, compared with 22.5% of all sectors.

There are 24 Higher Education Institutions and associated colleges in the UK delivering 44 higher education courses, including: 10 Honours degrees; 22 Foundation degrees; 11 HNDs; and 1 HNC. In Scotland, there additional colleges providing 147 hair and beauty related courses at HND or equivalent level.

Source: Assessment of current provision: hair and beauty sector – England 2008 and Habia Skills Needs Assessment 2007


Training

Training in hairdressing and beauty therapy is offered in over 1,000 assessment centres. Hairdressers and barbers are more likely to train through work-based learning than beauty therapists and spa therapists, who usually gain qualifications through full-time courses.

The sector is generally positive about ongoing work-based training. However, there is a predicted decrease in training planned for next year across the sector.

The Habia 2007 employer survey reported that only the hairdressing industry had a significant number of employers who had either a training budget or a written training plan. There is a high degree of involvement in work-based learning in the hairdressing industry and application of training and development procedures acquired by work based trainers and assessors to the whole business.

Barriers to training are reported to be the monetary cost to the employer, time out of salon, and the poor quality of training available. Training provided by private training providers and manufacturers is considered by employers to be better than that delivered through further education establishments.

Source: Assessment of current provision: hair and beauty sector – England 2008 and Skills foresight for the hair and beauty sector 2007