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Occupations

Occupational distribution within the sector as whole a is polarised between jobs at the lower end of the structure (elementary occupations) and those at the upper end of the scale (managerial occupations). For instance:

  • Elementary occupations account for 35% of all employment within the sector, compared with 11% across all sectors in the UK.
  • Managerial occupations account for 22% of all employment within the sector, compared with16% across all sectors in the UK.

Within the industries:

  • 86% of all occupations within the cleaning and support services industry are classified as elementary occupations, accounting for around 225,300 jobs.
  • 47% of all occupations within the facilities management industry are within managerial occupations, approximately 28,500 jobs.
  • 28% of all occupations within the housing and property industry are within managerial occupations, approximately 109,200 jobs.
  • 24% of all occupations within the housing and property industry are within associate professional and technical occupations (around 95,300 jobs), compared with 15% across all sectors in the UK.

Source: Asset Skills Sector Skills Assessment – UK 2010


Entry and progression

There are no formal entry requirements for jobs in the cleaning industry. However, employability skills including literacy, numeracy, communication, language, team working and customer service skills are an advantage to those wishing to enter the industry. There are a range of industry endorsed courses, apprenticeships and training schemes for those wishing to enter the industry or change career. Many take the opportunity to gain experience in the industry before starting up their own business.

For entry into facilities manager posts, a first degree in facilities management or a related subject is preferred. However with relevant experience, there are opportunities for entry without formal qualifications. For junior positions, there are no specific entry requirements. Many entrants come from specific industry roles in cleaning, catering and security, which are separate disciplines that make up facilities management.

Facilities management companies are looking for entrants with a strong commitment to customer services, good negotiating skills and the capacity to manage separate types of technical services within an overall facilities management contract.

Recruitment into the housing industry focuses on attracting people with the right skills in terms of personality and then training them for the job. People need to be able to communicate effectively and they must have the desire and ability to help people who may find themselves in stressful situations. It is important to have an understanding of people from diverse cultural backgrounds and an ability to respond to people with different needs. The housing industry has a strong tradition of developing the talent of its staff.

There are no formal entry requirements for jobs in the parking industry. Employees wanting to progress to managerial roles can develop customer care, IT and financial management skills that can be used to further their career in parking

In the property and planning industry, there a range of industry endorsed courses and degree courses in estate management, building surveying or other related areas. For certain occupations in the industry, such as surveying, a degree is normally required. To get chartered status, degrees must be accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. Other jobs in property, such as estate agency, do not always require formal qualifications and there are examples of people moving into property from other occupations later in their careers.

Source: Asset Skills LMI report March 2010

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Sector skill shortage vacancies

In England, the greatest proportions of skill shortage vacancies in the sector are within:

  • Elementary occupations – which make up 21% of all skill shortages. Skills found to be lacking were: customer handling skills; literacy skills; and team-working skills.
  • Professional occupations – which make up 19% of skill shortage vacancies. Skills lacking included: oral communication skills; and IT professional skills.
  • Sales and customer service occupations – comprising 17% of all skill shortages. Skills found to be more lacking included: customer handling skills; oral communication skills; and problem solving skills.

Source: Asset Skills Sector Skills Assessment – UK 2010

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Sector skill gaps

The main two skills gap areas identified in the National Employer Skills Survey included: technical and practical skills (50%); and customer handling skills (46%). Higher than average skills gaps in the sector were identified in:

  • Written communication
  • General IT user skills
  • Management skills
  • Literacy

Sector employers reported that skill gaps impacted on their business:

  • 51% of employers stated that skill gaps led to increased workload for other staff (compared with 55% across all sectors).
  • 14% stated that skill gaps led to difficulties meeting quality standards (compared with 26% across all sectors)
  • 14% stated that skills gaps had led to difficulties introducing new working (compared with 25% across all sectors)

In Scotland, only one in five Scottish employers report skills gaps. Skills gaps are most evident in administrative and secretarial occupations, and managerial staff, including:

  • Customer handling skills (67%)
  • Problem solving skills (63%)
  • Planning and organising (59%)
  • Oral communication skills (53% )
  • Team working skills (50%)

In Wales, problem solving and customer handling skills are reported to be required. The greatest incidence of skill gaps was noted in:

  • Sales/customer service staff (7%)
  • Transport / machine operatives (5%)
  • Professional occupations (5%)
  • Associate professionals (5%)

10% of employers within the sector in Northern Ireland reported skills gaps. There is a high incidence of skills gaps in:

  • Administrative and secretarial occupations
  • Elementary occupations
  • Managers and senior officials

Source: Asset Skills Sector Skills Assessment – UK 2010

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Salaries

Pay scales in the sector are variable, so the following provides an indication of the wages structure of the current workforce:

In the cleaning industry:

  • Caretaker £12,000 - £20,000
  • Cleaner £6,000 - £10,000
  • Cleaning Supervisor £8,000 - £10,000
  • Cleaning Manager £18,000 - £21,000

In the facilities management industry:

  • Assistant Facilities Manager £20,000 plus
  • Facilities Managers £26,000 - £50,000
  • Director £50,000 plus

In the housing industry:

  • Administration role £14,000
  • Junior Housing Officer £16,000 plus
  • Housing Officer £25,000 plus
  • Housing Manager £29,000 - £50,000 plus

In the parking industry:

  • Car Park Attendant £13,000 - £18,000
  • Civil Enforcement Officer £13,000 - £24,000
  • Car Park Team Leader £23,000 - £33,000
  • Parking Administration Manager £25,000 - £28,000
  • Contracts Manager £30,000 - £40,000
  • Car Parking Manager £35,000 - £45,000

In the property and planning industry:

  • Auctioneer £18,000 - £40,000
  • Block Manager £20,000 - £40,000
  • Domestic Energy Assessor £20,000 - £25,000
  • Estate Agent £10,000 - £40,000 plus
  • Surveyor £20,000 - £40,000 plus
  • Town Planner £20,000 - £60,000

Source: Asset Skills LMI report March 2010

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Occupational roles and sources of information

The Asset Skills website, Find your way, has a range of career information sheets on occupations in the different industries, which include career paths, salaries and case studies.

The Graduate Prospects website has detailed information on the Property and construcation sector, including links to additional sources of information.

The National Careers Service website also has detailed occupational profiles for some occupations in the sector. These profiles include information on entry points, training, working environment, employment opportunities and expected annual. Selected roles include:land and property valuer and auctioneer; land surveyor; Planning and development surveyor; facilities manager; and estate agent.

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