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Equal Opportunities

Gender

Across the sector as a whole, 80% the workforce is female. However, senior management roles remain male dominated. The proportion of women in the workforce varies greatly by role and sub-sector, for instance:

  • 85%-90% of direct care providing jobs are occupied by women.
  • 80% of local authority social workers are female.
  • 81% of learning mentors are female.
  • 77% of educational psychologists are female.

Forecast suggest that men’s share of employment in the sector may be increasing. Men have a larger share of employment for some occupations, such as:

  • houseparents and residential wardens)
  • social services managers

But women account for almost all of the nursery nurses (99%) and childminders and related workers (97%).

Sources: Skills for Care and Development AACS LMI report 2010 and UK Sector Skills Assessment 2010


Ethnicity

The proportion of workers from a non-white ethnic or national group is just over 10%. The proportion of workers from non-white ethnic/national groups increased by 76% between 2002 and 2008.

In adult social care, 78% of local authority social workers are white and 16% from Black Minority Ethnic groups.

In early years, children and young people’s services:

  • 9% of the workforce in childcare and early year’s provision is from Black Minority Ethnic Groups.
  • 5% of the workforce in sessional day care is from Black Minority Ethnic groups.
  • 90% of front line staff in Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service are white, 5.5% Black, 1.8% Asian and 1.4% mixed heritage.

A growing proportion of the workforce were born and/or qualified overseas:

  • 16% of care assistants and home carers were born overseas.
  • There were 14,000 applications under the Worker Registration Scheme in a 29 month period between 2004-2006.
  • Over 24,000 work permits were granted to senior carers in 2003-2004.
  • 3% of the Scottish social services workforce are migrant workers.
  • Between 1% and 9% (dependent on the setting) of the Welsh workforce are migrants.
  • Around 8% of registered social workers in the UK qualified overseas.
  • Around 19% of all social workers had been born abroad (almost half are based in London).

Sources: Skills for Care and Development AACS LMI report 2010 and UK Sector Skills Assessment 2010


Age

The social care workforce includes a higher proportion of workers aged 45 to 59 years (36% of workers), compared with all sectors (31%). Some estimates suggest that virtually no workers are aged under 18, the UK average is 2%. Comparison of the age profiles for male and female workers suggests that the gender gap in employment may be wider for younger men.

When people started working in social care, 57% were 30 years and over, 32% were 40 years or older and 11% were 50 years or older.

47% of male educational psychologists is aged 55 years and over, compared with 26% of female workers

In adult social care, staff in full day care settings:

  • 29% are aged 16-24 years
  • 43% 25-29 years
  • 17% 40-49 years
  • 10% 50 years and over

In early years, children and young people’s services:

  • 64% of Family Court Advisers in Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service are aged over 50 years and 16.1% is over 60 years
  • Staff in pre-school and playgroup settings
  • 4% are aged 16-24 years
  • 36% 25-29 years
  • 40% 40-49 years
  • 19% 50 years and over

Sources: Skills for Care and Development AACS LMI report 2010 and UK Sector Skills Assessment 2010


Disability

The proportion of workers describing themselves as being DDA disabled with a work-limiting disability was estimated at 119,000 or 7.48% of the sector workforce. This is compared with an all industry average of 5.18% of the total workforce.

The proportions of workers describing themselves as DDA disabled (6.89%) or as having a work-limiting disability only (3.58%) were also higher than the all industry average (5.35% and 2.70%, respectively).

The overall proportion of workers describing themselves as disabled was just under 18% or equivalent to 286,000 workers. This compares with an overall estimate of 3.8 million workers, 13.2% of the total workforce.

In early years, children and young people’s services:

  • 1% of the workforce in childcare and early years provision is disabled
  • 1% of the workforce in sessional day care is disabled
  • 94% of the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service workforce report no disability

Source: Skills for Care and Development AACS LMI report 2010 and UK Sector Skills Assessment 2010