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Economic and strategic implications of China's rise

Speakers: Prof Mark Beeson (Murdoch University), Commentators: Dr Liu Tiewa (Beijing Foreign Studies University), Prof Shaun Breslin (Warwick) and Dr Peter Ferdinand (Warwick)

Monday 17 June 2013, 12:30pm - 3:45pm, Venue: R0.12 (Ramphal Building), The University of Warwick

Lunch-seminar: number of participants limited to 20 people and booking a place in advance required via e-mail to Michiel Foulon (m.w.b.foulon@warwick.ac.uk). Open to staff, PhD students and MA students. Click here for the poster.


Much has been said about the economic and military development of China in recent years, yet relatively little research has been conducted on how to ultimately understand the implications of China’s recent development. More precisely, significant economic and military growth in China certainly took place in recent years, but did this yield China more political power? Most recently, David Shambaugh argued that ‘while China seems to have become omnipresent, it still remains a ‘partial power’ today’ (2013). Thus, while questions of how to understand implications of China’s rise may be rather obvious, they remain relatively poorly examined and, moreover, the research that has been conducted on this topic more recently seem to leave us with inconclusive answers, not at least in the economic sphere.

The Warwick East Asia Study Group heartily welcomes you to its lunch-seminar where Professor Mark Beeson (Murdoch University) will present his research findings on this topic of ‘Economic and strategic implications of China’s rise’, both within and beyond the East Asian region. Participants are recommended to read Professor Beeson’s recent article in Third World Quarterly:

“The ‘rise of China’ is proving to be one of the most consequential developments of the early 21 century. One of the key questions it raises is about the impact this historically unprecedented process will have on the East Asian region in particular and the world more generally. Will Chinese policy makers be able to translate the country’s growing material importance into other forms of political power and influence? Equally importantly, will Chinese elites be ‘socialised’ into the practices and norms of extant institutions, or will they attempt to redefine them to further Chinese foreign policy goals? “ (Beeson, Mark (2013) ‘Can China Lead?’, Third World Quarterly, 34:2, 233-250)


Warwick East Asia Study Group Lunch-Seminar
Economic and strategic implications of China's rise
Monday 17 June, Venue: R0.12 (Ramphal Building)


12.30 pm: Lunch and engaging with speakers
1 pm: Prof Mark Beeson (Murdoch University)
1.40 pm: Commentator: Dr Liu Tiewa (Beijing Foreign Studies University)
1.50 pm: Commentator: Prof Shaun Breslin (Warwick)
2 pm: Commentator: Dr Peter Ferdinand (Warwick)
2.10 pm: Q&A, moderated by Michiel Foulon (Warwick)
3.30 pm: Closing remarks

Participants are recommended to read Professor Beeson’s recent article in Third World Quarterly: Beeson, Mark (2013) ‘Can China Lead?’, Third World Quarterly, 34:2, 233-250

Lunch-seminar: number of participants limited to 20 people and booking a place in advance required via e-mail to Michiel Foulon (m.w.b.foulon@warwick.ac.uk). Open to staff, PhD students and MA students.

Listen to the seminar:

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Listen to the Q&A:

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