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Guidance for Staff on Module Proposals

This document is intended to provide guidance for staff in the completion of forms for new and revised module proposals. Pedagogical advice can be provided by the Learning and Development Centre and the Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning.

Before you start 

  1. Ensure that the content and learning outcomes of the proposed module are consistent with those of the courses on which it will be offered and the overall module offering of the Department.
  2. Check that the module proposed does not unnecessarily duplicate the content of other modules offered.
  3. Think about the numbers of students likely to want to study the module and whether it will therefore be viable.
  4. Make sure your module is going to be submitted for approval in time. Modules offered on courses that start at the beginning of the academic year should be approved by the end of the preceding Easter vacation. Modules offered on courses that start throughout the academic year should be approved no later than four months before the course is due to commence. Exceptions to this deadline will only be permitted in exceptional circumstances (e.g. if modules are being proposed by new members of staff who do not join the University in time to meet the deadline).
  5. Check whether there are the resources to run the module (e.g. suitable teaching rooms, equipment). These may be required within your department, or you may need to contact the Library, Space Management and Timetabling, IT Services etc.

Date of Introduction/Change

The month and year in which the module will first be offered or the date from which the revision will apply.


 
Reasons for Change
 
If you are amending a module, set out the rationale for the change and indicate the elements of the module proposal which are being revised.
 
Consultation
 
Confirm that consultation has taken place with any other departments affected by the proposal and that they are satisfied with the proposal being submitted. Departments may be affected either because students on their courses may have the module available to them as a core or optional module, or because they offer a module covering similar topics. If consultation has taken place, please list the departments concerned.
 
1. Module Code 

Module codes are assigned once a module has been approved for the first time. This should be included in the form if a module is being revised.

2. Module Title

The title of the module should be brief, express clearly the content of the module and distinguish it from similar modules.

3. Lead Department

This is the name of the Department in which the module is based.

4. Name of module leader

If this is not a member of Warwick staff, you will need to provide a CV which demonstrates that the module leader has sufficient expertise and experience to teach the module.

5. Level

Modules can be offered at the following levels:

  • 4 (previously C): normally equivalent to first year full-time undergraduate
  • 5 (previously I): normally equivalent to second year full-time undergraduate
  • 6 (previously H): normally equivalent to third/final year of full-time undergraduate
  • 7 (previously M): equivalent to Masters and fourth year of full-time integrated Masters degrees.
  • 8 (previously D): doctorate

Qualification descriptors of the levels can be found at http://www.qaa.ac.uk/AssuringStandardsAndQuality/Qualifications/Pages/default.aspx 

6. Credit Weighting

Credit weightings are expressed in terms of CATS points which reflect the workload the module represents for the student (including self study, contact hours, assessments etc.). One point is expected to equate roughly to 10 hours of ‘student effort’ (i.e. a 30 CATS module should equate to 300 hours of ‘student effort’). The University operates the following CATS structures at undergraduate level:

  • 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 etc.
  • 7.5, 15, 30, 45, 60

For postgraduate courses the following CATS structure is normally applied but variation is permitted: 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60

Choose the credit weighting that is consistent with the courses on which the module will be offered; modules may have multiple credit weightings.

Further information on credit and CATS can be found at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/quality/categories/courseapproval/credit/

7. Principal Module Aims

Provide a brief general statement explaining the purpose of the module, how students will benefit from taking it and its role in the context of the subject as a whole.

8. Principal Learning Outcomes

Provide a brief general statement explaining the high level learning outcomes of the module. This information is used in the University Module Catalogue.

9. Timetabled Teaching Activities

A summary of the contact teaching hours on the module.

E.g. 10x1 hour lectures

10x1 hour seminars

This information is used in the University Module Catalogue.

10. Departmental Web-link

Provide the web-link for the page where more information about the module can be found, normally on the departmental web-site. This information is used in the University Module Catalogue.

11. Other Essential Notes

If applicable, provide any other information which it might be helpful to know about the module e.g. only runs in alternate years. This information is used in the University Module Catalogue.

12. Summary Assessment Methods

A summary of the information contained in section 18.

13. Departments responsible for teaching

This information is used to inform internal resource allocation in the University so any teaching splits need to be fair and accurate. If staff in departments other than the lead department are undertaking teaching on the module, confirmation will also need to be given here that the Heads of those Departments have given their approval.

14. Availability of the module

  • This information and that on credit weighting (CATS) is used to change Course Regulations and to determine which modules students are permitted to register for.
  • List the names and course codes of all degree courses on which the module is to be taught.
  • State whether the module is a core module, optional (if so, on which list), or optional core.
  • Provide the years of study on which the module will be available on each course.
  • Make sure that the introduction of new modules complies with existing Course Regulations unless these are also to be changed.
  • Consult with any departments on whose courses the module is/will be offered.

15. Minimum number of registered students

Give the minimum number of registered students required to run the module; there may be a standard minimum within your Department. It is recognised that there will be circumstances in which modules must be offered regardless of the number of students registered (e.g. for external accreditation). If this is the case provide a brief explanation.

16. Pre- and Post-Requisite Modules

List any modules that must have been successfully completed in order to register for the proposed module. Also list any modules which can only be taken if the proposed module has been successfully completed.

17. Teaching activities

(a) The teaching and learning activities listed should, for each activity:

  • specify the type, frequency and durationtotal amount experienced by the typical student throughout the duration of the module. of activities (e.g where there are 2 x 1 hours lectures per week for 10 weeks, 20 hours should be entered against lectures; for 1 hour of seminars per week for 25 weeks, 25 hours input against seminars, for a single practical session lasting 8 hours, 8 entered against practical class/workshops).

(b) The teaching and learning activities listed should, in total:

  • be of an appropriate level for the CATS weighting and level of the module concerned;
  • be consistent with comparable modules within the department and similar disciplines;
  • Include variations for modules to be offered at different CATS weightings;

(c) If you wish to introduce innovative teaching activities you may wish to seek advice from the Teaching Grid, Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning or the Learning and Development Centre.

Information entered in this section for undergraduate level modules is used to calculate the teaching and learning information incorporated into the course Key Information Set (KIS).

For assistance in completing this section, please refer to the definitions and detailed guidance in relation to the KIS at Annex A.

18. Assessment Methods

(a) The assessment methods and the volume of assessment should be:

  • appropriate for the level of study and the CATS weighting of the module;
  • consistent with assessment methods for similar modules within the department and cognate disciplines.

(b) Assessment weightings (i.e. the weighting attached to each form of assessment in the calculation of the module mark) should be consistent with regulations covering the courses on which the module is offered.

(c) If the module is to be offered at different CATS weightings, the relevant variations in assessments methods should be specified.

(d) If you wish to introduce innovative assessment methods you may wish to seek advice from the Teaching Grid, Institute for Advanced Teaching and Learning or the Learning and Development Centre.

Information entered in this section for undergraduate level modules is used to calculate the teaching and learning information incorporated into the course Key Information Set (KIS).

For assistance in completing this section, please refer to the definitions and detailed guidance in relation to the KIS at Annex A.

18a. Final chronological assessment

Please indicate which of the assessments listed in item 18 will be chronologically the final item of assessment for the module.

If there are several possible options for assessment, such that different assessments may be the chronologically last assessment, please clearly indicate the chronologically last assessment for each assessment options.

  • For example: where two assessment patterns are offered for the module:
  • Option one: an essay accounting for 50% of the module mark and an examination accounting for 50%;
  • Option two: an essay accounting for 25% of the module mark; a project accounting for 25%; an examination accounting for 50%
  • The chronological order of these is: essay (whether 50% or 25%), exam, project.
  • Item 18a should be completed as follows…
  • 50/50: examination
  • 25+25/50: submission of project

19. Assessment Feedback Methods

Set out the methods that will be used for providing students with feedback on assessments.

20. Syllabus

Provide a brief outline of the topics/themes to be covered in the module (no more than a paragraph).

21. Bibliography

Provide a brief list of the core texts in an accepted referencing style.

22.Learning Outcomes 

Learning outcomes should list the skills and knowledge the student will be able to demonstrate on successful completion of the module, the teaching and learning methods by which these outcomes will be achieved and how these will be assessed.

Outcomes should be appropriate to the level of study of the module and should reflect the learning outcomes of the courses on which the module will be offered. Further information on descriptors for learning outcomes can be found at http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/quality/categories/courseapproval/outcomes/

Learning outcomes should include reference to the following:

  • Subject knowledge and understanding: for instance, ‘a theoretical knowledge of the principles of archaeology’;
  • Key Skills: for instance written communication skills, teamworking, use of databases.
  • Cognitive Skills: for instance, ability in critical analysis, the ability to formulate and test concepts and hypotheses.
  • Subject-Specific Skills/Professional Skills: for instance, laboratory skills, research skills and methods.

23. Resources

Provide details on the arrangements that have been made to meet any additional resources required to teach the module (e.g. equipment, staff, teaching rooms, Library text books). You may need to consult with other departments or offices of the University in some cases (such as Space Management and Timetabling, Examinations Office).

24. Approval

This section should be completed once the final version of the module has been approved and should indicate the date of approval, approving committee and the minute reference (if applicable), and contain the signature of the Chair of the committee and the signature of the Head of Department, which may be electronic.

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