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Nip Panic Attacks in the Bud!

'Nip Panic Attacks in the bud' Workshop - no current workshop date available, thank you for your interest.

“For me, the first sign is a tight feeling in my chest. I get a sense of urgency, like there’s something very important I should be doing...my breathing gets faster; my heart is racing; I can’t relax; I watch out for it happening. Sometimes I can catch it before it gets to be a full blown panic attack”

 

What is a panic attack?

There are a number of expressions used to describe the effects of a panic attack, e.g. “stress response”, “fight or flight”, “anxiety attack”. Generally panic attack refers to an abrupt surge of intense anxiety. It is like a fire alarm system in your body. The alarm can switch on out of the blue or it gets activated whenever you feel angry, threatened or challenged. Instead of ringing a bell, however, a panic attack causes a complex set of physical changes to take place.

 

What is happening to me?

 

Here are some of the important changes:

 

o Your blood sugar rises to give you more energy

o Your breathing speeds up to supply more oxygen to burn the sugar

o Your heart rate increases to pump the oxygen and sugar faster

o Blood is diverted from the stomach and skin so as to go toward large muscles

o You perspire more to help you cool down

o Chemicals called endorphins are released to reduce sensitivity to pain

 

The workshop

 

By means of discussion, video clip, smaller group exercise, the workshop aims to raise awareness of both the physical and the psychological effects of experiencing panic attacks. It will consider the importance of picking up on the first signs of anxiety and how to catch it early and avoid being overwhelmed by panic.

 

Workshop Facilitator: Anthea

All workshops will be held in Westwood House on the Westwood Campus. For more details, contact the Secretary, Trudy Haywood, on 024 7652 3761, internal extension 23761 or call in at the Secretary's desk, Westwood House.  

All workshops are designed and facilitated by counsellors from the UCS team.