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Liberal Arts (Full-Time, 2018 Entry)

 

What will I learn?

Do you enjoy thinking about the big questions that are facing contemporary society and the world at large? This course will suit you if you enjoy approaching complex problems from the perspective of more than one discipline. Starting with a rich and varied range of modules in the first year, the course
becomes progressively more specialised allowing you to tailor your learning to suit your own intellectual interests.

Your first year is foundational, covering the principles of Liberal Education as well as Research Methods across a range of disciplines including Humanities and Social Sciences. You study two core modules (Art and Revolution; and Science, Society and the Media) as well as one optional module of your choice. You also complete the Certificate of Digital Literacy. Towards the end of the first year, you choose either a Disciplinary Interest or a Specialist Interest (based on a Big Question rather than a particular academic discipline). Our Director of Student Experience will help to support and guide you in making this decision.

Your second year comprises 50% core modules (examining the broad questions of Consumption and Sustainability) and 50% optional modules from your chosen field of interest. During this year you develop your communication skills and add new perspectives to your academic knowledge by taking part in a national conference of undergraduate research. An internship scheme or work placement in the summer of your second year enables you to apply the skills you’ve developed to real-world challenges. After your second year, you have the option to spend an intercalated year at one of our partner institutions (in Europe, Australia or the US), adding a year to the duration of your course. Your final year comprises 75% modules chosen from your Disciplinary or Specialist Interest. A final dissertation or project makes up the remaining 25% of your final year.

Disciplinary Interests

► History
► Philosophy
► Theatre and Performance Studies
► Classics
► English
► Economics
► Languages
► Film and Television Studies
► Life Sciences

Specialist Interests
► Global Sustainable Development
► Social Justice
► Food Security

How will I learn?

The course is constructed around Problem-Based-Learning (PBL). This dynamic student-centred way of learning allows the course to evolve and adapt to the social, political, scientific and historic environments in which it is delivered. PBL also allows for a continual revising of the course to suit the particular learning needs of students.

This trans-disciplinary approach to learning will include lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, in which you will be taught by a range of academics, from different disciplines, who will communicate their expertise on a specific issue and describe their methodology for addressing it. Your role is to bring together these various approaches and to develop your own informed stance on each issue.
You will become aware of how different disciplines coincide and converge and you will learn to address questions by deploying the most appropriate methodology and utilising the most relevant evidence.

How will I be assessed?

We have devised an assessment strategy that allows you to develop your expertise in addressing problems using a variety of perspectives from the Arts, Sciences and Social Sciences. We will teach you to use a range of methods of research, and this will equip you with a solid foundation from which you can approach contemporary problems critically and creatively.

Consequently, the range of assessments on this degree combines the traditional (essays and written examinations) with the innovative (creative projects, portfolios and performance). For example, in the first year of the degree you will take the Art and Revolution module where you will review films, analyse graffiti and draft articles for the media conveying your own, unique perspective on the ways in which Artistic movements have pre-empted or reacted to Revolutionary moments. Conversely, in the module on Science, Society and the Media you will focus on analysing data, critiquing case studies, engaging with political and scientific documents as well as undertaking practical activities, as part of the formal assessment. In addition, during the course you will produce short critical essays, analyses and written reviews – some of which may be in the form of contributions to online blogs and forums - research papers, reflective journals and portfolios and oral presentations.

You will be expected to present your work in a public forum such as the British Conference for Undergraduate Research or the International Conference of Undergraduate Research. You will contribute to group projects and deliver extended pieces of writing (for the final year dissertation) as well as sit mid- and end-of-year short tests and traditional end of year written examinations.
The methods of assessment across the course as a whole vary according to the optional modules that you choose each year and therefore the route that you follow through the course. For example, if you follow the Life Sciences pathway, you may also undertake laboratory-based assessment.

What opportunities are there to study abroad?

You will have the opportunity to spend an intercalated year at one of our partner institutions (in Europe, Australia, the USA). The Study Abroad Team based in the Office for Global Engagement offers support for these activities.

Entry Requirements

A level AAA plus grade B in English and Mathematics at GCSE

International Baccalaureate 38 points Including English and Mathematics.

These normally exclude General Studies and Critical Thinking.

Contextual data and differential offers Warwick may make differential offers to students in a number of circumstances. These include students participating in the Realising Opportunities programme, or who meet two of the contextual data criteria. Differential offers will be one or two grades below Warwick’s standard offer (to a minimum of BBB).

Access Courses Access to HE Diploma (QAA-recognised) including appropriate subjects with distinction grades in level 3 units. Candidates must meet the essential subject requirements.

Warwick International Foundation Programme (IFP) All students who successfully complete the Warwick IFP and apply to Warwick through UCAS will receive a guaranteed conditional offer for a related undergraduate programme (selected courses only). For full details of standard offers and conditions visit the IFP page.

We welcome applicants with non-standard qualifications or relevant experience, and applicants with other recognised qualifications.

Further Information

Taking a gap year Applications for deferred entry welcomed.

Interviews We do not typically interview applicants.Offers are made based on your predicted and actual grades, along with your personal statement. Occasionally, some applicants may be interviewed, for example candidates returning to study or those with non-standard qualifications.

Personal Statements Applicants who meet or who are predicted to meet the entry requirements for this course will be requested to submit a second personal statement directly to the University. Details on how and when to do this, as well as guidance about what the statement should contain, will be provided at the time of the request.

Departmental Open Days We invite all offer holders to Departmental Open Days in the spring term. Find out more about our main University Open Days and other opportunities to visit us.

What modules could I study?

Your first year is foundational, covering the principles of Liberal Education as well as Research Methods across the Humanities, Sciences and Social Sciences disciplines. You study two core modules (Art and Revolution; and Science, Society and the Media) as well as one optional module of your choice. You also complete the Certificate of Digital Literacy. Towards the end of the first year, you choose either a Disciplinary Interest or a Specialist Interest (based on a Big Question rather than a particular academic discipline). Our Director of Student Experience will help to support and guide you in making this decision.

Your second year comprises 50% core modules (examining the broad questions of Consumption and Sustainability) and 50% optional modules from your chosen field of interest. During this year you develop your communication skills and add new perspectives to your academic knowledge by taking part in a national conference of undergraduate research. An internship scheme or work placement in the summer of your second year enables you to apply the skills you’ve developed to real-world challenges. After your second year, you have the option to spend an intercalated year at one of our partner institutions (in Europe, Australia or the US), adding a year to the duration of your course. Your final year comprises 75% modules chosen from your Disciplinary or Specialist Interest. A final dissertation or project makes up the remaining 25% of your final year.

Disciplinary Interests
► History
► Philosophy
► Theatre and Performance Studies
► Classics
► English
► Economics
► Languages
► Film and Television Studies
► Life Sciences

Specialist Interests
► Global Sustainable Development
► Social Justice
► Food Security

Find out more about the course structure and modules on the Liberal Arts web pages.

*The modules mentioned above may be subject to change. Please read our terms and conditions for more detailed information.

What careers can a Warwick degree in Liberal Arts lead to?

A Liberal Arts degree prepares you to adapt to constantly changing environments, analyse problems and offer solutions from varied perspectives, and the breadth of subjects covered is well regarded by employers. Graduates from Liberal Arts courses have enjoyed success in a wide range of fields including law, teaching, media, business, academia, politics and public service.

* This course recruited its first cohort of students in 2016; information about their graduate destinations will be shared on our website in due course.

As this is a new course which began in October 2016, the information to inform an accurate KIS widget for Liberal Arts at Warwick is not available. Please visit the Unistats website for more information.

Essential information

Entry Requirements
A level: AAA plus grade B in English and Mathematics at GCSE

IB: 38 points Including English and Mathematics.

UCAS code
LA99

Duration
3 years full time (30 weeks per academic year)

Department website

Department of Liberal Arts

Student Blogs

Adrian Lawrence, Liberal Arts

Location of study

University of Warwick, Coventry

Tuition fees
Find out more about fees and funding.

Other course costs
There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course. For further information on the typical additional costs please see the Additional Costs page.

Download prospectus (pdf)

Order a prospectus

How to apply

This information is applicable for 2018 entry.