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Politics, Philosophy and Law (Full-Time, 2018 Entry)

 

What will I learn?

This course is for students who wish to explore relationships between a functioning society and how political and legal systems are structured and operate, as well as the philosophical origins and basis for law. You will explore concepts such as justice, freedom, morals and democracy, as well as the formulation and implementation of law and policy across the world. You’ll be taught jointly by the internationally renowned Departments of Politics & International Studies, and Philosophy and the School of Law, each of which is ranked highly in UK league tables. On this integrated programme students can focus equally on the three disciplines of politics, philosophy and law and will also explore the relationship between them. The course develops skills of analysis, persuasive argument, interpretation of legal cases, and both qualitative and quantitative methods applicable to social science. You’ll also learn how to analyse complex global issues such as human rights, immigration and climate change using these powerful interdisciplinary approaches.

You will study each of the three PPL disciplines in all three years. In your first year you’ll study core introductory modules for each discipline plus a core interdisciplinary module in PPL. In your second year you’ll choose optional cores from a list in each department such as Theories in International Relations, Ethics and Applied Ethics, and International Law. At least 25% of your modules will therefore be in each discipline with the remaining 25% of option modules drawn from any of the three departments, enabling you to focus up to 50% in one area in the second and third year. Your third year allows you to choose from the full list of final year modules in each department, including the possibility of writing an interdisciplinary PPL dissertation.

How will I learn?

Lectures provide you with information, analysis and argument, on the basis of which you prepare for discussion or problem solving in your seminars. Seminars are much smaller groups, in which you deepen and further your learning through interactive group discussion, debates, and exchange of ideas. Your seminar tutor or lecturer will provide you with reading, instructions, notes or tasks, and set the format and guide the discussion or work, prompting debate and involving the whole group in the task at hand. You’ll be expected to prepare independently or in groups, and share your views and debate the issues and concepts with your classmates.

Lecturers and seminar tutors are available outside of class to give advice on essay writing and on other matters related to their module. They will also give you feedback on your essays to help you improve your writing and problem-solving techniques.

Research training, personal and professional development are all embedded into your PPL degree programme. Through modules, extracurricular activities, skills workshops, careers events and one-to-one advice sessions, you will be able to hone the skills that employers and further study programmes are looking for.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment is by a mixture of coursework and exams, and in some modules you are allowed to choose the assessment method. The first year exams are qualifying exams and do not count towards your degree classification. This will be determined on the basis of your second- and third-year results.

Can I study abroad?

We support student mobility through study abroad programmes and all students have the opportunity to apply for an intercalated year abroad at one of our partner universities. The Study Abroad Team based in the Office for Global Engagement offers support for these activities, and the Department’s dedicated Study Abroad Co-ordinator can provide more specific information and assistance.

  • Entry Requirements

    A level AAA (No specific subject requirement)*

    International Baccalaureate 38 points (No specific subject requirement)

    *A level offers normally exclude General Studies and Critical Thinking

    Further Information

    Taking a gap year Applications for deferred entry welcomed.

    Interviews We do not typically interview applicants.Offers are made based on your predicted and actual grades, along with your personal statement. Occasionally, some applicants may be interviewed, for example candidates returning to study or those with non-standard qualifications.

    Departmental Open Days All students who receive an offer will be invited to visit the department to meet staff and students. Find out more about our main University Open Days and other opportunities to visit us.

What modules can I study?

You will study each of the three PPL disciplines in all three years. In your first year you’ll study core introductory modules for each discipline plus a core interdisciplinary module in PPL. In your second year you’ll choose optional cores from a list in each department such as Theories in International Relations, Ethics and Applied Ethics, and International Law. At least 25% of your modules will therefore be in each discipline with the remaining 25% of option modules drawn from any of the three departments, enabling you to focus up to 50% in one area in the second and third year. Your third year allows you to choose from the full list of final year modules in each department, including the possibility of writing an interdisciplinary PPL dissertation.

First year:
- Core Interdisciplinary module: Introduction to Politics, Philosophy and Law
- Core Politics module: Introduction to Politics
- Core Philosophy module: Introduction to Philosophy
- Tort Law or Criminal Law*

Second year:
- Either ‘History of Modern Philosophy’ OR both ‘Ethics’ and ‘Applied Ethics’
- Either ‘International Law’ OR ‘General Principles of Constitutional and Administrative Law’
- 30 CATS of PAIS modules chosen from: Political Theory From Hobbes (30 CATS); Theories of International Relations (30 CATS); Core Issues in Comparative Politics (30 CATS); International Security (30CATS); States and Markets: An Introduction to International Political Economy (30 CATS)
- 30 CATS of optional modules from the optional lists in PAIS, Philosophy or Law

Third year:
- 30 CATS Philosophy modules chosen from optional honours modules offered by Philosophy
- 30 CATS Law modules chosen from optional honours modules offered by Law
- 30 CATS PAIS modules chosen from optional honours modules offered by PAIS
- 30 CATS modules chosen from optional honours modules across PAIS, Philosophy or Law department

Students will have the option to choose to undertake a dissertation, which can be chosen to be in PPL (PAIS, Philosophy and Law) or to follow a dissertation route in any of PAIS, Philosophy or Law

Find out more about the course structure on the department website.

* The modules mentioned above may be subject to change. Please read our terms and conditions for more detailed information.

Where can my degree take me?

* This course will recruit its first cohort of students in 2017; information about their graduate destinations will be shared on our website in due course.

  • Politics
  • Philosophy
  • Law

Essential information

Entry Requirements
A level:
AAA

IB: 38 points

UCAS Code: V7MW

Duration
3 years full time (30 weeks per academic year)

Department website
Department of Politics and International Studies

School of Law

Student blogs

Leyla Hunn - Philosophy

Shanita Jetha - Politics and International Studies

Simran Thakral - Politics and International Studies

Rana Younis - Law

Tohmev Singh - Law with Social Sciences

Location of study
University of Warwick, Coventry

Tuition fees
Find out more about fees and funding

Other course costs
There may be costs associated with other items or services such as academic texts, course notes, and trips associated with your course.

For further information on the typical additional costs please see the Additional Costs page.


Download a prospectus (PDF)

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This information is applicable for 2018 entry.