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Department of French Studies - Doctoral Studentships

The Department of French Studies at the University of Warwick invites applications for two fully-funded PhD studentships from strong candidates in any area of French Studies (broadly defined) in which the Department is able to offer supervision.

The studentships will be for full-time study over three years, commencing ideally in 2009. Each studentship includes full tuition fees for graduate research (EU/UK rates) (£3,390 in 2009-10) and a grant in line with the UK Research Councils’ standard maintenance grant (£13,290 for full-time award holders in 2009-10). The deadline for applications for these studentships is Friday 10 July 2009,12 noon.

The Department of French Studies at Warwick offers an intellectually challenging and innovative approach to French Studies. It is one of the leading Departments of French Studies in the country, highly rated in both teaching and research, and enjoys a strong international reputation. In the 2010 Independent Good University Guide, which ranks subjects according to student satisfaction, research quality, entry standards and graduate prospects, French Studies at Warwick was ranked 4th, just behind Oxford, St. Andrews, and Cambridge. Importantly, the department secured an exceptional rating in the UK’s most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008): according to the proportion of research classified in the top two categories (‘world-leading’ and ‘internationally excellent’), the department was placed equal first among all UK French Departments returned. In terms of the consistency of excellence or average score of the Department’s submission as a whole, we were rated joint second in the whole of the UK.

As well as studying towards a PhD in French Studies, successful candidates will be expected, as part of the award, to undertake suitable teaching or administrative assistance for the department, of up to 6 hours per week.

Applicants should normally have a good first degree or equivalent in a relevant field, and ideally will already have, or will be near to having, a postgraduate qualification such as a Master’s or an equivalent further relevant form of academic experience.

How to apply

Applicants should send both a complete curriculum vitae, including the names and contact details of two academic referees, and a covering letter of not more than two pages describing the proposed area of study and the approach to be followed, to the Postgraduate Secretary, Mrs Alison Cressey, Department of French Studies, University of Warwick, Coventry CV2 7AL by Friday 10 July 2009, 12 noon local time. Applications by email attachment are acceptable (A.Cressey@warwick.ac.uk).

Short-listed candidates will also be required to submit a separate application for admission to Warwick University’s Graduate School, via the University’s on-line system. The Department will give further guidance on this process, as needed.

Informal enquiries may be made by email to the Director of Graduate Studies, Dr Ingrid De Smet (I.de-Smet@warwick.ac.uk) or to the Head of Department, Professor Seán Hand (S.Hand@warwick.ac.uk).

For general details of the Department’s research profile, please see www.warwick.ac.uk/go/french/about/staff/.

The Department welcomes applications that relate to any of the areas associated below with a particular member of staff.

Early Modern literature and cultural studies (1500-1800)

  • Dr Emma Campbell: Old French and Anglo-Norman literature, modern critical theory and medieval manuscript culture.
  • Dr Katherine Astbury: reception of women writers and of women’s writings; theatre of the French Revolution.
  • Dr Ingrid De Smet: polemicists, pamphlets and print culture of the French Wars of Religion; Early Modern intellectual culture; French Neo-Latin Literature (including studies in the Classical Tradition and the History of Scholarship); women and belief.

Twentieth-Century French Intellectual History

  • Dr Jeremy Ahearne: Pierre Bourdieu; Michel de Certeau.
  • Professor Seán Hand: philosophies of aesthetics; ethics; theological writings; philosophies of travel.
  • Prof. Nicholas Hewlett: intellectuals and politics; Alain Badiou, Etienne Balibar, Jacques Rancière.
  • Professor Leslie Hill: Maurice Blanchot; Jacques Derrida; twentieth-century critical thought.

Modern Cultural Studies (literature, film, cultural theory, cultural history)

  • Dr Pierre-Philippe Fraiture: ethnography and fiction.
  • Dr Samantha Haigh: postcolonial film; diaspora and Migration in film and/or literature; bodily difference.
  • Dr Douglas Morrey: postcolonial film; the legacy of the New Wave in French cinema; science fiction in contemporary French culture.
  • Dr Oliver Davis: François Bon; Jacques Rancière; critical methodology; French queer literary politics.

Francophone postcolonial studies

  • Dr Pierre-Philippe Fraiture: French-speaking culture from Belgium; colonial writing and exotic imagination; post-colonial Sub-Saharan fiction and thought.
  • Dr Samantha Haigh: French Caribbean writing, including Haiti.

French politics and policy

  • Dr Jeremy Ahearne: modern and contemporary cultural and educational policy debates.
  • Prof. Nicholas Hewlett: contemporary French political thought on the left; the theory and practice of democracy in France; political violence.
  • Dr James Shields: political institutions, parties and elections under the Fourth and Fifth Republics; politics and ideology of the far right from the Vichy regime to the present.

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